For the Record

Caroline Brettell elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Caroline BrettellNoted SMU anthropologist Caroline Brettell joins actress Carol Burnett, musician John Legend, playwright Lynn Nottage, immunologist James Allison and other renowned leaders in various fields as a newly elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The class of 2017 will be inducted at a ceremony on Saturday, Oct. 7 at the Academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Brettell joins 228 new fellows and foreign honorary members — representing the sciences, the humanities and the arts, business, public affairs and the nonprofit sector — as a member of one of the world’s most prestigious honorary societies.

“Caroline Brettell is an internationally recognized leader in the field of migration, and one of Dedman College’s most productive scholars,” said Thomas DiPiero, dean of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. “I couldn’t be happier to see her win this well-deserved accolade.”

“I am surprised and deeply honored to receive such a recognition,” said Brettell, Ruth Collins Altshuler Professor in the Department of Anthropology and director of the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute. “It is overwhelming to be in the company of Winston Churchill, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jonas Salk and the ‘mother’ of my own discipline, Margaret Mead. And I am thrilled to have my favorite pianist, André Watts, as a member of my class. I am truly grateful to join such a distinguished and remarkable group of members, past and present.”

> See the full list of American Academy of Arts and Sciences members

Brettell’s research centers on ethnicity, migration and the immigrant experience. Much of her work has focused on the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex as a new immigration gateway city, especially on how immigrants practice citizenship and civic engagement as they meld into existing economic, social and political structures. She has special expertise in cross-cultural perspectives on gender, the challenges specific to women immigrants, how the technology boom affects immigration, and how the U.S.-born children of immigrants construct their identities and a sense of belonging. An immigrant herself, Brettell was born in Canada and became a U.S. citizen in 1993.

She is the author or editor of nearly 20 books, most recently Gender and Migration (2016, Polity Press UK) and Identity and the Second Generation: How Children of Immigrants Find Their Space, co-edited with Faith G. Nibbs, Ph.D. ’11 (2016, Vanderbilt University Press). Her research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Wenner Gren Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation, among many others.

An SMU faculty member since 1988, Brettell has held the Dedman Family Distinguished Professorship and served as chair in the Department of Anthropology and as director of Women’s Studies in Dedman College. She served as president of the Faculty Senate and a member of the University’s Board of Trustees in 2001-02, and was dean ad interim of Dedman College from 2006-08. Brettell is a member of the American Anthropological Association, the American Ethnological Society, the Society for Applied Anthropology, the Society for the Anthropology of Europe, and the Society for Urban, National and Transnational Anthropology, among others.

She joins David Meltzer, Henderson-Morrison Professor of Prehistory in Dedman College (class of 2013), Scurlock University Professor of Human Values Charles Curran (class of 2010), and the late David J. Weber, founding director of the University’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies (class of 2007) as the fourth SMU faculty member to be elected to the Academy.

“It is an honor to welcome this new class of exceptional women and men as part of our distinguished membership,” said Don Randel, chair of the Academy’s Board of Directors. “Their talents and expertise will enrich the life of the Academy and strengthen our capacity to spread knowledge and understanding in service to the nation.”

“In a tradition reaching back to the earliest days of our nation, the honor of election to the American Academy is also a call to service,” said Academy President Jonathan F. Fanton. “Through our projects, publications, and events, the Academy provides members with opportunities to make common cause and produce the useful knowledge for which the Academy’s 1780 charter calls.”

Since its founding in 1780, the Academy has elected leading “thinkers and doers” from each generation, including George Washington and Benjamin Franklin in the 18th century, Daniel Webster and Ralph Waldo Emerson in the 19th, and Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill in the 20th. The current membership of about 4,900 fellows and 600 foreign honorary members includes more than 250 Nobel laureates and more than 60 Pulitzer Prize winners. The Academy’s work is advanced by these elected members, who are leaders in the academic disciplines, the arts, business, and public affairs from around the world.

Members of the Academy’s 2017 class include winners of the Pulitzer Prize and the Wolf Prize; MacArthur Fellows; Fields Medalists; Presidential Medal of Freedom and National Medal of Arts recipients; and Academy Award, Grammy Award, Emmy Award, and Tony Award winners.

> Read the full story, and learn more about selected members of the AAAS class of 2017, at SMU News

2017-04-21T10:22:14+00:00 April 18, 2017|For the Record, News|

SMU honors outstanding achievement, service at 2016-17 Hilltop Excellence Awards, Honors Convocation

Laurel wreath stock photoSMU faculty, staff, administrators and students were recognized with teaching awards, service honors and the University’s highest commendation, the “M” Award, at the 2016-17 Hilltop Excellence Awards Monday, April 17.

Earlier in the day, the University honored its best students at the 20th Honors Convocation. The address was delivered by Jo Guldi, assistant professor of history in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

> Find a complete list of award winners from Honors Convocation 2017

A native Dallasite, Guldi studies the history of Great Britain and the British Empire, landscape history, legal history, property law, infrastructure, digital methods, international development, and agrarian studies. As a digital and data historian, she also oversees the lecture series “Data is Made Up of Stories: University-wide Futures From the Digital Humanities,” offered through the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute. Among other things, the series illustrates how text mining is used across different disciplines – from digital mapping of the transatlantic slave trade to an app that captures the inspiration for Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

Guldi is the designer of Paper Machines, a free, open-source software toolkit that allows users to visualize large amounts of text for historical and political analysis over time and space, without requiring special computational resources or technical knowledge. She is the author of Roads to Power: Britain Invents the Infrastructure State (2012, Harvard University Press) and co-author with David Armitage of The History Manifesto (2014, Cambridge University Press), currently being translated for publication in six languages. She graduated from Harvard with an A.B. degree in literature, earned her Ph.D. in history from the University of California-Berkeley and was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital History at the University of Chicago. She was also a Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows and served a fellowship in the metaLAB (at) Harvard. Prior to joining SMU, she served as an assistant professor of history at Brown University.

(more…)

2017-04-17T13:44:02+00:00 April 18, 2017|For the Record, News|

Three SMU professors receive 2017-18 Colin Powell Fellowships

SMU Colin Powell Fellows 2017-18Three SMU professors have received 2017-18 Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowships from the University’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies.

The award gives SMU faculty members up to $5,000 for research contributing to knowledge of what President George H.W. Bush referred to as the New World Order. The professors will present their findings at a Tower Center seminar in fall 2018.

The three honorees and their projects:

  • Sabri Ates, associate professor of history in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, will use the award to finish writing his latest book, Seyyid Abdulqadir Nehri’s Pursuit of an Independent Kurdistan. Ates explores the historical conditions that account for how the Kurds became the largest ethnic group without its own nation and is writing the work “as part of an ongoing discussion about the Kurds in particular and the greater Middle East in general.”
  • Michael Lusztig, professor of political science in Dedman College, will use the award to finish his new book, The Culturalist Challenge to Liberal Republicanism, which has been accepted for publication by McGill-Queen University Press. Lusztig explores the risks multiculturalism poses to liberal democracy through examination of Mexican immigration to the United States and Islamic immigration to Europe.
  • Hiroki Takeuchi, associate professor of political science in Dedman College, plans to investigate the security implications of global value chains in the Asia Pacific. Takeuchi will explore whether cross-border relationships built off of trade – such as those created by multinational corporations that have different stages of production in different countries – contribute to peace and international cooperation.

> Read the full story from the SMU Tower Center blog

2017-04-25T15:08:19+00:00 April 13, 2017|For the Record, News|

Matthew B. Myers named dean of SMU’s Cox School of Business

Matthew B. MyersMatthew B. Myers, a global marketing and strategy expert with special expertise in cross-border business relationships and Latin American economies, has been named dean of SMU’s Cox School of Business. He will assume his new duties on Tuesday, August 1, 2017, at which point Albert W. Niemi Jr., who has been dean of the school since 1997, will transition to full-time teaching.

“As the new dean of the Cox School of Business, Matt Myers brings extraordinary energy for outreach to the regional, national, and global business community,” said Steven C. Currall, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs. “The range of his previous administrative and professorial experiences also equips him to lead the school toward even greater faculty research excellence, as well as innovative educational programs for Cox undergraduates, graduate students and working executives. Furthermore, Matt is deeply committed to collaborations with other academic units on the SMU campus to advance interdisciplinary academic programs and initiatives.”

“The Cox School of Business and its international academic reputation will be in good hands with Matt Myers,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “His expertise in global trends, particularly in cross-border and Spanish-language markets, will be invaluable to our faculty and students – especially as programs such as the Cox School’s Latino Leadership Initiative and the Mission Foods Texas-Mexico Center in Dedman College continue to evolve. In addition, his vision and leadership as a fundraiser will help secure the ongoing health of these centers of excellence, as well as the promise of innovations to come.”

As dean and Mitchell P. Rales Chair of Business Leadership of the Farmer School of Business at Miami University of Ohio, Myers manages an $80 million budget and recently launched the first independent fund-raising campaign for a college at Miami University. The $200 million effort includes a $40 million lead gift, the largest philanthropic gift in Miami history. The Farmer School of Business is a top-10 producer of Fortune 500 CEOs and maintains undergraduate, graduate and executive programs with a student body of approximately 4,300 and more than 250 faculty and staff members.

“I am extremely excited about becoming the next dean of the Cox School of Business at SMU,” Myers said. “I wish to thank President Turner, Provost Currall, and the SMU community for this opportunity, and I look forward to joining a wonderful group of faculty, staff, and students. The Cox School’s dedication to quality programs and research excellence, in addition to its supportive and engaged network of alumni and business partners, make the school an exhilarating place to be for anyone passionate about business education.”

“Matthew Myers is a terrific choice to lead the Cox School of Business into the future,” said longtime Cox School Dean Albert W. Niemi Jr. “Matt is an accomplished teacher and researcher, and he has a keen understanding of the global economy. He will be a wonderful addition to SMU’s leadership team, and Maria and I look forward to welcoming Matt and his family to Dallas and the Cox community.”

> Cheryl Hall, Dallas Morning News: SMU hires global expert as new business school dean

Myers has written extensively on knowledge sharing in cross-border business relationships, international pricing strategies, and comparative marketing systems. His research has been published in leading journals including the Strategic Management Journal, the Journal of Marketing, the Journal of Operations Management, the Journal of International Business Studies, and Sloan Management Review. He also served as co-editor of the Handbook of Global Supply Chain Management (2006, SAGE Publications). His current work focuses on the effects of foreign direct investment in supply-chain functions on developing-economy performance and wealth distribution.

As an educator and consultant, Myers has traveled extensively and worked with organizations in the global distribution, chemical, insurance, education, pharmaceutical, and marketing research industries. He has served as a visiting faculty member at ESSEC Business School-Paris and the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. He also has taught at the Vienna University of Economics and Business as well as in Italy, Romania, Taiwan and Uzbekistan. In addition, he has led executive education courses in China, Vietnam, India, Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Hungary and Poland.

Prior to his tenure at Miami, Myers served as the Nestlé Professor and associate dean of executive education in the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee, where he oversaw a grant from the U.S. Air Force as well as cooperative educational relationships with Oak Ridge National Laboratories. He was recognized three times as the Outstanding Faculty Member for M.B.A. programs and received the University of Tennessee’s Chancellor’s Award for Globalization Initiatives.

A military veteran, Myers served in the U.S. Army Airborne at Ft. Kobbe, Canal Zone, Republic of Panama and at Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia, from 1979 to 1982. He is a member of the Society of Fellows of the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan organization dedicated to educational and policy issues.

Myers earned his Ph.D. degree in marketing and international business from Michigan State University in 1997. He received his Master of International Business Studies with a focus on Spanish-language and Latin American economies from the University of South Carolina in 1992. He graduated with a B.A. from the University of Louisville’s College of Natural Sciences in 1986.

Provost Currall expressed thanks to Albert W. Niemi Jr. for his 20 years of service as dean of the Cox School. Dean Niemi, who currently holds the Cox School’s Tolleson Chair in Business Leadership, plans to return to full-time teaching during the 2017-18 academic year as the William J. O’Neil Chair in Global Markets and Freedom.

> Read the full story from SMU News

 

2017-04-06T14:31:51+00:00 April 6, 2017|For the Record, News|

SMU CIO Joe Gargiulo to retire; University names committee to search for successor

Joe Gargiulo

SMU Chief Information Officer Joe Gargiulo, who has helped lead the University to significant gains in connectivity and high-performance computing, has announced his plans to retire at the end of the 2016-17 academic year. He will continue to serve in his current position as the University searches for its next CIO.

“As SMU’s first chief information officer, Joe Gargiulo has led the University to modernize, expand and enhance its ability to create, collaborate and share knowledge,” said President R. Gerald Turner. “His leadership, both in creating a 21st-century information infrastructure and in guiding how we use and think about technology’s benefits and challenges, will have a positive effect on how our community learns, teaches, researches and connects now and into the future.”

Gargiulo has served as SMU’s CIO since 2008. As part of the Operational Excellence IT Shared Services initiative, he led the department through a consolidation and streamlining process that allowed OIT to become more agile and responsive to the University community. A critical component included the reorganization and launch of the improved Academic Technology Services team. He received the President’s Award for Outstanding Leadership in 2009 and a Commendation from the Faculty Senate in 2004.

He has also helped to lead the introduction of high-performance computing at SMU. In 2014, he led the installation team for SMU’s ManeFrame supercomputer in a new data center located south of Mockingbird Lane on Central Expressway. ManeFrame boasted nearly 11,000 central processing unit cores, 26 terabytes of memory, and more than two petabytes of storage. His team is currently installing SMU’s fourth-generation supercomputer, ManeFrame II, which is expected to bring a six-fold increase in computing power and will rank among the top academic supercomputers in the nation.

> More about ManeFrame at SMU’s Center for Scientific Computation homepage

In addition, Gargiulo has led the University’s Office of Information Technology in expanding and upgrading secure wireless access, adopting new classroom technology, upgrading disaster-recovery protocols and services, and introducing improved cyber security measures such as Two-Factor Authentication.

Gargiulo came to SMU in 1998 from Fidelity Investments, where he served as a vice president and managed a team of 80 software developers responsible for various systems focused on customer data and analytics. He began his SMU career managing the University’s Y2K efforts and the conversion from legacy systems to PeopleSoft; he also assisted with the SMU Central University Libraries’ conversion to the Voyager library-management software system. In the 2005 Information Technology Services reorganization, he was appointed executive director of administrative computing, responsible for Administrative Systems Training, Software Applications, Systems, Telecommunications, and User Services.

In his professional service, Gargiulo has been a member of the Lonestar Education and Research Network (LEARN) Board for 10 years and serving as a member of its Executive Committee for six years, as chairman of the board in 2015, and working with CIOs from 40 other Texas colleges and universities. LEARN provides advanced network services for research, education, healthcare and economic development throughout Texas and is the connector to Internet2.

From 1975 to 1977, Gargiulo served in the United States Navy aboard the U.S.S. Plymouth Rock (LSD-29). He received his bachelor’s degree in business administration (Management Information Systems) from Old Dominion University, where he graduated magna cum laude and was selected Outstanding MIS Senior.

President R. Gerald Turner has appointed a search committee for Gargiulo’s successor. Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies James E. Quick will chair the committee, whose members include:

  • Amit Basu, Carr. P. Collins Chair of Management Information Sciences and chair, Information Technology and Operations Management, Cox School of Business (co-chair)
  • Rachel Mulry, director of customer service, Office of Information Technology (co-chair)
  • Ernie Barry, associate vice president for budgets and finance, Business and Finance
  • Gary Brubaker, director, SMU Guildhall
  • Jo Guldi, assistant professor of history, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Thomas Hagstrom, professor of mathematics and director, Center for Scientific Computation, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences
  • Duane Harbin, assistant dean for technology, planning and compliance, Perkins School of Theology
  • Charles Headley, executive director, Development Services, Development and External Affairs
  • Frank Hernandez, Annette and Harold Simmons Centennial Chair in Education Policy and Leadership and associate dean, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development
  • Greg Ivy, associate dean for library and technology, Dedman School of Law
  • Toni Nolen, interim co-director, Technical and Digital Services, Central University Libraries
  • David Sedman, associate professor of film and media arts, Meadows School of the Arts
  • Mitchell Thornton, Cecil H. Green Chair in Computer Science and Engineering and research director, Darwin Deason Institute for Cyber Security, Lyle School of Engineering
  • Michael Tumeo, director, Office of Institutional Research
  • Sharla Walker, associate director, Office of Financial Aid

Mai Bui will serve the committee as liaison to Human Resources. Brooke Guelker will support the committee, which welcomes input from the SMU community regarding possible candidates for the position. The executive search firm of Russell Reynolds Associates will assist the University in the national search.

Inquiries, nominations and applications should be sent in strict confidence (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF files preferred) to:

Dr. Jett Pihakis
Russell Reynolds Associates
SMU.CIO@russellreynolds.com
(202) 654-7800

2017-03-29T10:01:43+00:00 March 29, 2017|For the Record, News|
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