For the Record

23 outstanding SMU professors honored at 2017 HOPE Awards banquet

 

SMU’s Department of Residence Life and Student Housing honored 23 outstanding professors at the 2017 HOPE Awards Banquet Tuesday, Feb. 7.

Mark Chancey, professor of religious studies Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, was honored as 2017 Professor of the Year.

HOPE (Honoring Our Professors’ Excellence) Award recipients are named through student staff member nominations as professors who “have made a significant impact to our academic education both inside and outside of the classroom.”

The complete list of 2017 HOPE Award honorees:

Cox School of Business

  • Jay Carson, Management and Organizations
  • Liliana Hickman-Riggs, Accounting
  • Sal Mistry, Management and Organizations
  • Mukunthan Santhanakrishnan, Finance
  • Greg Sommers, Accounting
  • Tilan Tang, Finance

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

  • Stephanie Amsel, English
  • Mark Chancey, Religious Studies (HOPE Professor of the Year)
  • Rita Economos, Earth Sciences
  • Liljana Elverskog, World Languages and Literatures (Arabic)
  • Serge Frolov, Religious Studies
  • Luigi Manzetti, Political Science
  • Alberto Pastor, World Languages and Literatures (Spanish)
  • Elizabeth Wheaton, Economics
  • Brian Zoltowski, Chemistry

Lyle School of Engineering

  • Elena Borzova, Mechanical Engineering,
  • Joseph Camp, Electrical Engineering
  • Rachel Goodman, Engineering Management, Information and Systems

Meadows School of the Arts

  • Brandi Coleman, Dance
  • Lee Gleiser, Meadows Marketing and Communications
  • Will Power, Theatre
  • Jared Schroeder, Journalism

Dedman School of Law

  • Martin Camp, Graduate and International Programs

> Read more from The Daily Campus

February 14, 2017|For the Record, News|

Research: New SMU study connects running motion to ground force

SMU researchers have developed a concise new explanation for the basic mechanics involved in human running. Their research has immediate application for running performance, injury prevention, rehab and the individualized design of running shoes, orthotics and prostheses.

The work integrates classic physics and human anatomy to link the motion of individual runners to their patterns of force application on the ground – during jogging, sprinting and at all speeds in between.

The approach could enable the use of individualized gait patterns to optimize the design of shoes, orthoses and prostheses according to biomechanics experts Kenneth Clark, Laurence Ryan and Peter Weyand, who authored the new study.

The ground force-time patterns determine the body’s motion coming out of each step and therefore directly determine running performance. The impact portion of the pattern is also believed to be a critical factor for running injuries.

“The human body is mechanically complex, but our new study indicates that the pattern of force on the ground can be accurately understood from the motion of just two body parts,” said Clark, first author on the study and currently an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology at West Chester University in West Chester, Pennsylvania.

“The foot and the lower leg stop abruptly upon impact, and the rest of the body above the knee moves in a characteristic way,” Clark said. “This new simplified approach makes it possible to predict the entire pattern of force on the ground — from impact to toe-off — with very basic motion data.”

> Read the full story at the SMU Research blog

February 10, 2017|Faculty in the News, For the Record, News, Research|

Seven SMU students and recent graduates are semifinalists for 2016-17 Fulbright grants

Seven SMU students and recent graduates have been selected as semifinalists in the 2016-17 Fulbright U.S. Student Program grant competition. Winners of Fulbright grants will be announced this spring.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, the Fulbright program is the largest U.S. international exchange program, offering grants for advanced research and study, as well as teaching assistantships.

“These students and graduates are SMU world changers who already have made significant impacts in their fields,” said Kathleen Hugley-Cook, director of SMU’s Office of National Fellowships and Awards, which supports students and faculty members during the application process. “We are proud of their success in this round of the competition.”

The semifinalists:

  • Hope Anderson, a senior majoring in history, human rights and sociology in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, is pursuing an English teaching assistantship in Nepal.
  • Emily Bernet ’16, who earned a Bachelor’s degree in dance performance in Meadows School of the Arts, is pursuing a grant for conservatory study in England.
  • Kristen Biedermann ’16, who earned a Master’s degree in Simmons School of Education and Human Development, is pursuing an English teaching assistantship in Colombia.
  • Adam Garnick, a graduate student in Simmons School of Education and Human Development, is pursuing an English teaching assistantship in Hungary.
  • Jennie Lee ’16, who earned Bachelor’s degrees in voice performance in Meadows School of the Arts and in Italian in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, is pursuing an English teaching assistantship in Germany.
  • Olivia Nguyen, a senior major in French and biological sciences in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, is pursuing an English teaching assistantship in Vietnam.
  • Rebecca Rothstein ’16, who earned a Bachelor’s degree in theatre in Meadows School of the Arts, is pursuing a grant for performance study in Germany.
February 2, 2017|For the Record, News|

Elena D. Hicks begins role as SMU’s new dean of admission Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017

This story was originally published Jan. 30, 2017.

Elena Hicks

After an extensive national search, SMU has appointed Elena D. Hicks, dean of admission at Loyola University Maryland, as the University’s new dean of undergraduate admission. She began her SMU service on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017.

In her new role, Hicks oversees all activities in the SMU Office of Admission, including admission for first-year, transfer and international applicants. She also will work closely with SMU Public Affairs to develop the University’s marketing messages, and with faculty, staff and alumni to recruit high achieving undergraduate students from across the United States and around the world.

“We are pleased to welcome Dean Hicks to the SMU admission team, and back to her home state of Texas,” said Wes Waggoner, associate vice president for enrollment management in the Office of the Provost. “Her experience and knowledge in admission is extensive, and she understands the profession in a way that will complement our current staff and guide SMU through the enrollment opportunities and complexities before us. She is firmly committed to increasing [the University’s] academic stature and ensuring that its student body is talented, diverse and eager to engage with our faculty in the classroom.”

With 27 years of education experience, Hicks has considerable knowledge about student recruitment, selective admission and family involvement. At Loyola, she successfully developed and implemented recruitment strategies that resulted in a significant increase in first-year applications and an increase in the enrollment size of the entering class during her nine-year tenure.

Hicks’ ties to SMU are deeply rooted. Her great-grandfather Robert L. Peace (a Dallas native), began working at SMU as it opened its doors, and he proudly served the institution for 37 years. Other family members, inspired by Robert’s passion for the University, worked at SMU in various capacities over the years.

“I have a passion for education and strongly believe in SMU’s commitment to shape world changers, thus I am extremely honored to be selected as the University’s new dean of undergraduate admission,” said Hicks. “I feel confident that my myriad of experiences will help move the office of admission’s goals and strategies forward, while establishing collaborative partnerships and strengthening relationships with the overall community.”

> Read the full story from SMU News

January 30, 2017|For the Record, News|

SMU’s Tower Center, Latino Center for Leadership Development award nine new research grants

Latino Center for Leadership Development logoThe Latino Center for Leadership Development (Latino CLD) and SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies have awarded nine grants to 13 scholars tapped to provide meaningful research geared to promoting a stronger understanding of the Latino community and creating a dialogue about key societal issues.

As the Tower Center-Latino CLD partnership’s first class of grant recipients, each research team will provide final reports that include a white paper with context, analysis and policy recommendations.

> More about the SMU Tower Center-Latino CLD research partnership

Awards were chosen by research grant advisory board members Miguel Solis, Latino CLD president; James Hollifield, SMU Tower Center academic director; and Alicia Reyes-Barriéntez and Aileen Cardona-Arroyo, SMU Tower Center postdoctoral fellows.

“Issuing these grants marks the beginning of a new approach to policy and research related to the Latino community,” Solis says.

“The research will not only find its way into academic journals and classrooms, but also will inform the decisions of emerging policy makers,” he adds. “The Latino CLD is serious about ensuring future leaders are armed with substantive policy ideas rooted in research, so the allocation of these grants will help ensure our vision becomes a reality.”

Grantees include faculty, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students from U.S. schools including SMU, Vanderbilt, UT-Austin and UCLA. Their research projects will focus such topics as education policy, public opinion/surveys, transnational students, African American-Latino coalitions, deportation’s effect on children, border enforcement and human rights, access to legalization as well as non-profit organizations’ services and resources.

The grantees’ first round of research findings will be presented at a public forum Saturday, April 1, 2017 at the Hall of State at Fair Park in Dallas. Additional research will be discussed at a fall forum that also will be free and open to the public.

For more details about the research grants, contact Melissa Alfaro, 619-249-9055.

January 27, 2017|For the Record, News|
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