Faculty in the News

SMU seismologist Brian Stump named Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Brian W. Stump, Albritton Professor of Geological Sciences and AAAS Fellow, SMUSMU seismologist Brian Stump has been named an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellow for distinguished contributions to his field, particularly in the area of seismic monitoring in support of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

AAAS is the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. Stump, Albritton Chair of Geological Sciences in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences of SMU’s Dedman College, is the fifth SMU professor to be recognized as an AAAS Fellow.

> Learn about Dr. Stump’s work at the SMU Research blog

“Dr. Stump is a scientist of the first rank and brings the results of his outstanding research into the classroom, where his students benefit from his example and insights as a scholar,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “He richly deserves the AAAS recognition by his peers and we are proud that he calls SMU home.”

“Brian’s work has been seminal in scientists’ ability to rapidly and accurately discern the difference between an earthquake, a conventional explosion (such as might occur in a mining accident) and a nuclear test,” said James Quick, SMU vice president for research and dean of graduate studies. “His research is tremendously important to all of us, and yet he is equally committed to teaching and serving as a mentor to young faculty.”

> SMU News: SMU-UT study shows “plausible” connection between DFW quakes and saltwater injection well

Stump is well known regionally for his continued work researching the increase of small earthquakes that have been occurring in North Texas since 2008. But his work in detecting ground motion from explosions has for more than 20 years proved invaluable to the United States government in ensuring that the world’s nuclear powers abide by their agreements related to underground nuclear testing. He served as scientific adviser to the U.S. delegation to the Conference on Disarmament from 1994 through 1996 and continues to be called upon frequently to assist the U.S. government in the interpretation of seismic and acoustic data.

“I’m humbled by the recognition by the AAAS that science impacts the society in which we live,” Stump said. “I really believe that. And the work we’ve done at SMU on inducted seismicity in North Texas has that same blend of real science and societal impact.”

> Brian Stump on CBS-11 News: Report looks at drilling wastewater and North Texas earthquakes

For the last five years Stump has chaired the Air Force Technical Applications Center Seismic Review Panel, which provides a review of federally funded efforts in nuclear monitoring. He served as a committee member on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Seismology and Continental Dynamics from 2007 through 2012, and recently completed a term as board chair for Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), a consortium of more than 100 universities funded by the National Science Foundation.

Stump joined SMU in 1983 from the Seismology Section of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico. He graduated summa cum laude from Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon with a bachelor of arts in physics in 1974, received a master of arts from the University of California-Berkeley in 1975 and received his Ph.D. in geophysics from UC-Berkeley in 1979 after completing a thesis titled Investigation of Seismic Sources by the Linear Inversion of Seismograms.

SMU faculty previously named as AAAS Fellows:

  • Volcanologist and research dean James Quick, who was named a Fellow in 2013
  • Environmental biochemistry scholar Paul Ludden, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs and a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, who was named a Fellow in 2003
  • Anthropologist David Meltzer, Henderson-Morrison Professor of Prehistory in the Department of Anthropology who was named a Fellow in 1998
  • James E. Brooks, provost emeritus and professor emeritus in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, who was named a Fellow in 1966.

The AAAS Fellows program began in 1874. AAAS members may be considered for the rank of Fellow if nominated by the steering group of their respective sections, by three Fellows, or by the association’s chief executive officer. Each steering group then reviews the nominations of individuals within its respective section and forwards a final list to the AAAS Council, which votes on the final list of Fellows.

> Read more from SMU News

Research: Blue-light blues – SMU study shows how artificial lighting can interfere with health, sleep, even animal migration

A NASA image of Earth’s city lights using data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program.

An image of Earth’s city lights using data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. (Credit: NASA)

An SMU study funded by the National Institutes of Health is unraveling the mystery of how blue light from residential and commercial lighting, electronic devices and outdoor lights can interfere with the natural body clocks of humans, plants and animals – and the negative consequences it can bring.

Exposure to blue light is on the increase, says SMU chemist Brian Zoltowski, who leads the study, “Protein : Protein interaction networks in the circadian clock.”

At the right time of day, blue light is a good thing. It talks to our 24-hour circadian clock, telling our bodies, for example, when to wake up, eat and carry out specific metabolic functions. In plants, blue light signals them to leaf out, grow, blossom and bloom. In animals, it aids migratory patterns, sleep and wake cycles, regulation of metabolism, as well as mood and the immune system.

But too much blue light — especially at the wrong time — throws biological signaling out of whack.

“As a society, we are using more technology, and there’s increasing evidence that artificial light has had a negative consequence on our health,” said Zoltowski, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

“Our study uses physical techniques and chemical approaches to probe an inherently biological problem,” he said. “We want to understand the chemical basis for how organisms use light as an environmental cue to regulate growth and development.”

SMU Assistant Professor of Chemistry Brian Zoltowski

SMU Assistant Professor of Chemistry Brian Zoltowski

Zoltowski’s lab was awarded $320,500 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to continue its research on the impact of blue light. They are studying a small flowering plant native to Europe and Asia, Arabidopsis thaliana – a popular model organism in plant biology and genetics, Zoltowski says.

Although signaling pathways differ in organisms such as Arabidopsis when compared to animals, the flower still serves an important research purpose. How the signaling networks are interconnected is similar in both animals and Arabidopsis. That allows researchers to use simpler genetic models to provide insight into how similar networks are controlled in more complicated species like humans.

In humans, the protein melanopsin absorbs blue light and sends signals to photoreceptor cells in our eyes. In plants and animals, the protein cryptochrome performs similar signaling.

Much is known already about the way blue light and other light wavelengths, such as red and UV light, trigger biological functions through proteins that interact with our circadian clock. But the exact mechanism in that chemical signaling process remains a mystery.

“Light is energy, and that energy can be absorbed by melanopsin proteins that act as a switch that basically activates everything downstream,” Zoltowski said.

Melanopsin is a little-understood photoreceptor protein with the singular job of measuring time of day. When light enters the eye, melanopsin proteins within unique cells in the retina absorb the wavelength as a photon and convert it to energy. That activates cells found only in the eye — called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglian cells, of which there are only about 160 in our body. The cells signal the suprachiasmatic nucleus region of the brain.

“We keep a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus — it controls our circadian rhythms,” he said. “But we also have other time pieces in our body; think of them as watches, and they keep getting reset by the blue light that strikes the master clock, generating chemical signals.”

The switch activates many biological functions, including metabolism, sleep, cancer development, drug addiction and mood disorders, to name a few.

“There’s a very small molecule that absorbs the light, acting like a spring, pushing out the protein and changing its shape, sending the signal. We want to understand the energy absorption by the small molecule and what that does biologically.”

The answer can lead to new ways to target diabetes, sleep disorders and cancer development, for example.

“If we understand how all these pathways work,” he said, “we can design newer, better, more efficacious drugs to help people.”

Written by Margaret Allen

> Read the full story at the SMU Research blog

SMU’s Caruth Institute for Engineering Education names Leanne Ketterlin-Geller director of K-12 STEM Initiatives

Leanne Ketterlin-GellerSMU’s Caruth Institute for Engineering Education has named Associate Professor Leanne Ketterlin-Geller as its new director of K-12 STEM Initiatives.

A faculty member in education policy and leadership and director of research in mathematics education in the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, Ketterlin-Geller will bring a cross-disciplinary focus to her new role with the Institute, housed in the University’s Lyle School of Engineering.

Ketterlin-Geller is an expert in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education, and her research focuses on mathematics education through instructional leadership principles and practices. Her new position will include working with the Caruth Institute’s Infinity Project, developing partnerships with area schools, working with Lyle engineering programs geared toward middle and high school students, and working with departments and faculty members to match their engineering expertise to K-12 outreach opportunities.

Ketterlin-Geller will work closely with Delores Etter, executive director of the Caruth Institute and TI Distinguished Chair in Engineering Education, as well as other faculty members from both schools to advance the K-12 STEM initiatives of the Institute.

“Professor Ketterlin-Geller’s extensive experience as a leader in STEM and K-12 education will bring much needed expertise in addressing the critical mission of the Caruth Institute,” Etter said. “Her role within the Simmons School of Education and Human Development will strengthen the necessary collaboration between our two schools.”

“The work that Dr. Ketterlin-Geller will direct is essential to our goal to increase the number and diversity of students with both the enthusiasm and knowledge to pursue the engineering careers that are necessary for the U.S. to compete in a global economy,” said Lyle Dean Marc Christensen. “This appointment demonstrates our commitment to the emerging collaborations between the Simmons School of Education and the Lyle School of Engineering. We look forward to what we can achieve together.”

“Through these Caruth Institute initiatives students will see the power of math in daily life – and engineering is where we really see this at work,” said Ketterlin-Geller. “We hope to develop engaging and interesting programs for both teachers and students that will help all students develop both confidence and competence in STEM fields. This collaboration presents an exciting opportunity to work across disciplines to help foster innovation in K-12 STEM education.”

A former high school science teacher, Ketterlin-Geller has served as principal investigator for federal, state, and locally funded research grants emphasizing the development of instructional materials and formative assessment procedures in mathematics. Much of her research is focused on supporting algebra readiness in elementary and middle school mathematics. She works closely with teachers and administrators to understand the application of measurement and assessment principles for making decisions in school settings. She publishes and delivers presentations on mathematics education, measurement and assessment as well as special education.

Ketterlin-Geller and Simmons School Dean David Chard are part of the national research team working on the George W. Bush Institute’s education initiative, Middle School Matters.

> Read the full story from SMU News

Faculty in the News: Oct. 7-20, 2014

George Holden, SMU Professor of Psychology

George Holden, SMU professor of psychology

George Holden, Psychology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, was featured in The Christian Science Monitor in an article examining corporal punishment. The article appeared on Oct. 20, 2014.

Bernard Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, published a news article regarding Canada’s recent increase in oil exports to the Star-Telegram. The article appeared Oct. 16, 2014.

Benjamin Phrampus, Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, discussed the possible relation of gas explosions and the Bermuda Triangle with LifeScience. The article appeared on Oct. 14, 2014.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, provided commentary for The New York Times in an article entitled “An Ad With a Wheelchair Shakes Up the Texas Governor’s Race.” The article appeared Oct. 13, 2014.

Bruce Bullock, Director of the Maguire Energy Institute, SMU

Bruce Bullock, director of SMU’s Maguire Energy Institute

Will Power, Theatre Artist-in-Residence, Meadows School of the Arts, received 11 AUDELCO nominations for his production Fetch Clay, Make Man. As part of the New York Theatre Workshop, Power’s production tells the story of Cassius Clay as the heavyweight boxing champion forms an unlikely friendship during the days leading up to one his most anticipated fights. News of Power’s nominations were features on Backstage Pass with Lia Chang on Oct. 12, 2014.

Bruce Bullock, Maguire Energy Institute, Cox School of Business, was featured in an article in The New York Times discussing the technology of liquid gas. The article was published on Oct. 7, 2014.

Faculty in the News: September 2014

Professor Willie Baronet. SMU Meadows School of the Arts.

Professor Willie Baronet. SMU Meadows School of the Arts.

Willie Baronet, Advertising, Meadows School of the Arts, was featured on KERA for his ongoing art history project of buying and collecting signs handmade by the homeless. After more than 20 years of purchasing signs and a recent cross-country trip, the article highlights Baronet’s work and what to expect in the future. The feature appeared on Sept. 25, 2014.

George Holden, Psychology, Dedman College, debated the benefits of corporal punishment with Michael Farris, CEO of ParentalRights.org, for NBC News. The video appeared on Sept. 25, 2014.

Jerry White, Director, Caruth Institute for Entrepreneurship, discussed SMU’s MBA Venture Fund reaching $3 million with the Dallas Business Journal. Run by MBA students taking SMU’s Venture Capital Practicum course, the fund gives students the chance to gain hands-on experience with a range of venture capital deals. The article appeared on Sept. 24, 2014.

Bernard Weinstein, Associate Director, Maguire Energy Institute, discussed reasons for the recent dip in gas prices with Star Telegram. The article appeared on Sept. 23, 2014. Weinstein was also featured on ABC Radio during The John Batchelor Show on Sept. 22, 2014 and the Omaha World Herald on Sept. 26, 2014.

Professor Cal Jillson. Dedman College of Humanities and Societies.

Professor Cal Jillson. Dedman College of Humanities and Societies.

Jeffrey Engel, Presidential Studies, Dedman College, provided commentary to CNN on White House security after the Sept. 19, 2014 breach. He discussed the importance of approachability to the White House as a powerful statement in a democracy, as well as the recent public attention on the Secret Service. The article appeared Sept. 22, 2014.

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Dedman College, commented on Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins political base after recent controversies with the Dallas Morning News. The article appeared Sept. 22, 2014. Jillson was also featured in the Houston Chronicle  providing commentary on Gov. Rick Perry. This article appeared on Sept. 28, 2014.

Bruce Bullock, Director, Maguire Energy Institute, discussed a new study on tracking and groundwater contamination with CBS DFW News. The article appeared Sept. 15, 2014.

By | 2014-10-07T16:40:21+00:00 October 7, 2014|Categories: Faculty in the News, For the Record, News, Year of the Faculty|

Meadows Theatre season opens with Black Snow Oct. 1-5, 2014

Black Snow 2For its first main stage production of 2014-15, Meadows Theatre presents Black Snow by Mikhail Bulgakov, adapted by Keith Reddin.

Often called the ultimate backstage novel, Black Snow displays the autobiographical and satirical components of Bulgakov’s experience with the Moscow Art Theatre. Based on Bulgakov’s relationship with famed director and inventor of Method acting Constantin Stainslavsky, Black Snow brings the writer’s struggle against censorship and autocrats to life through black comedy.

The Meadows production is directed by Blake Hackler, professor of theatre in Meadows School of the Arts.  As an actor, Blake has appeared in productions on and Off-Broadway, as well as in regional theaters throughout the country. As a teacher, Hackler currently holds faculty positions at Yale University and SMU.

Black Snow will run in the Greer Garson Theatre, Owen Arts Center, from Wednesday, Oct. 1 through Sunday, Oct. 5. Tickets are $7 for faculty, staff and students. A full cast and crew list can be found below.

Black Snow
Oct. 1-5, 2014
Greer Garson Theatre, Owen Arts Center, SMU

Crew:Screen Shot 2014-10-01 at 1.33.52 PM

  • Director – Blake Hackler
  • Scenic Designer – Darren Diggle (MFA ’16)
  • Costume Designer – Amanda Capshaw (MFA ’15)
  • Lighting Designer – Luther Frank (MFA ’15)
  • Sound Designer – Jason Biggs
  • Vocal Coach – Anne Schilling
  • Movement Coach – Sara Romersberger
  • Assistant Director – Jacob Lee Nice
  • Stage Manager – Jana Beeson (BFA ’14)

The Company:

  • Dylan Bare (BFA ’15)
  • Kieran Connolly*
  • Madeline Dockery-Fuhrmann (BFA ’15)
  • Jon Garrad (BFA ’15)
  • Danniel Gerchakov (BFA ’15)
  • Parker Gray (BFA ’16)
  • Dylan Guerra (BFA ’16)
  • Derek George (BFA ’15)
  • Taylor Harris (MFA ’16)
  • Justin Lemieux (MFA ’16)
  • Stephanie Machado (BFA ’15)
  • Brandon J. Murphy (MFA ’16)*
  • Seth Nelson (BFA ’16)
  • Kolby Tuck (BFA ’16)
  • Ally Van Deuren (BFA ’16)
  • Isaac Young (BFA ’16)

* Appears by special permission of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States

SMU’s Dedman College will house DFW chapter of the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship

Albert Schweitzer Fellowship logoThe Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (ASF) is launching a program chapter in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, to be housed in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. The chapter is supported by a consortium of area universities including Baylor University’s Louise Herrington School of Nursing, Texas Christian University, Texas Woman’s University, the University of Dallas, the University of Texas at Arlington, the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

Recruiting is underway for the chapter’s first class of Fellows, who will begin their Fellowship year in April 2015.

“The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship excels in developing emerging leaders in health who will serve vulnerable populations not just in their Fellowship year, but throughout their career,” said Sylvia Stevens-Edouard, Executive Director of The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship. “Our individual chapters supplement traditional education with programs focused on supporting emerging professionals’ desire to serve populations in need. Our new program in Dallas-Fort Worth will make important and vital contributions that will improve lives and create positive change.”

“The Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellowship Program will embrace Albert Schweitzer’s commitment to service and compassion for people in need,” said Courtney Roy, program director for the Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellowship Program. “Our program will support a range of projects that address health and well-being in multiple and creative ways, in order to reach those with needs that often go unmet in traditional healthcare and social service settings.”

“We are so pleased to host the Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellowship Program,” said Renee McDonald, associate dean for research and professor of psychology in Dedman College. “The values of The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship align closely with those of Southern Methodist University, which is to prepare students for leadership in their professions and their communities. We look forward this collaboration.”

Schweitzer Fellows are graduate students in healthcare fields, social work, law, education, and other fields who design and implement year-long service projects that address the root causes of health disparities in under-resourced communities, while also fulfilling their academic responsibilities. The process of moving their Fellowship projects from an initial concept to completion teaches Schweitzer Fellows valuable skills in working with others in allied fields. As Schweitzer Fellows develop professionally, this skill is critical to their ability to effect larger-scale change among vulnerable populations.

Schweitzer Fellows who have successfully completed their year-long service project are called Fellows for Life. Some of ASF’s Fellows for Life include:

Robert Satcher, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor, Anderson Cancer Center and NASA mission specialist; Rishi Manchanda, M.D., author of the TED book The Upstream Doctors: Medical Innovators Track Sickness To Its Source; and Jessica Lahey, J.D., who writes about education and parenting issues for The New York Times, The Atlantic and on her blog, Coming of Age in the Middle.

Additionally, three Schweitzer Fellows for Life are among those currently working in West Africa to fight the Ebola outbreak: Meredith Dixon, M.D., who is a CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service officer; Nahid Bhadelia, M.D., director of infection control at Boston’s National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory and a hospital epidemiologist at Boston Medical Center; and William Fischer II, M.D., a pulmonologist and critical care physician at UNC Health Care and UNC School of Medicine.

The Dallas-Forth Worth chapter will be the second Texas-based chapter; the Houston-Galveston chapter opened in 2008. The Dallas-Forth Worth chapter is ASF’s 12th US-based program. The others are in Baltimore; Boston; Chicago; Columbus-Athens; Los Angeles; New Orleans; New Hampshire and Vermont; North Carolina; Pittsburgh; and San Francisco.

ASF also has a program chapter based in Lambaréné, Gabon, at The Albert Schweitzer Hospital.

Written by Kimberly Cobb

> Read more from SMU News

Research: The speed secrets of super sprinters

The world’s fastest sprinters have unique gait features that account for their ability to achieve fast speeds, according to two new studies from SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development.

The new findings indicate that the secret to elite sprinting speeds lies in the distinct limb dynamics sprinters use to elevate ground forces upon foot-ground impact.

“Our new studies show that these elite sprinters don’t use their legs to just bounce off the ground as most other runners do,” said human biomechanics expert Ken Clark, a researcher in the SMU Locomotor Performance Laboratory and lead author on the studies. “The top sprinters have developed a wind-up and delivery mechanism to augment impact forces. Other runners do not do so.”

The new findings address a major performance question that has remained unanswered for more than a decade. Previous studies had established that faster runners attain faster speeds by hitting the ground more forcefully than other runners do in relation to their body weight. However, how faster runners are able to do this was fully unknown. That sparked considerable debate and uncertainty about the best strategies for athletes to enhance ground-force application and speed.

“Elite speed athletes have a running pattern that is distinct,” Clark said. “Our data indicate the fastest sprinters each have identified the same solution for maximizing speed, which strongly implies that when you put the physics and the biology together, there’s only one way to sprint really fast.”

The critical and distinctive gait features identified by the study’s authors occur as the lower limb approaches and impacts the ground, said study co-author and running mechanics expert Peter Weyand, director of the Locomotor Performance Lab.

“We found that the fastest athletes all do the same thing to apply the greater forces needed to attain faster speeds,” Weyand said. “They cock the knee high before driving the foot into the ground, while maintaining a stiff ankle. These actions elevate ground forces by stopping the lower leg abruptly upon impact.”

The new research indicates that the fastest runners decelerate their foot and ankle in just over two-hundredths of a second after initial contact with the ground.

The findings are reported in the Journal of Applied Physiology in the article, “Are running speeds maximized with simple-spring stance mechanics?” It appears online at Physiology.org in advance of appearing in the print journal.

Written by Margaret Allen

> Read the full story at the SMU Research blog

Tune In: Tower Center’s Joshua Rovner talks national security after al Qaeda on ‘Think’ Sept. 11, 2014

Joshua RovnerJoshua Rovner, director of studies in SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies, will discuss U.S. national security strategies in a post-al Qaeda landscape on KERA 90.1 FM Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014. Rovner will appear on “Think with Krys Boyd” during the 1-2 p.m. hour with Hal Brands, assistant professor of public policy and history at Duke University.

Tune in at www.kera.org/listen

Rovner and Brands are also among the speakers in tonight’s Tower Center Forum, “After al Qaeda: The Future of American Grand Strategy.” Joining them will be Barry R. Posen, Ford International Professor of Political Science and director of the Security Studies Program at MIT. The discussion, moderated by Rovner, will explore American “grand strategy” of the past, present, and future for maintaining national security.

The event is scheduled for 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014 in the Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. It is free and open to the public; reservations are required. RSVP to the Tower Center.

Learn more about SMU’s Tower Center online

Simmons Dean David Chard elected chair of National Board for Education Sciences

David Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU's Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human DevelopmentDavid Chard, Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, has been elected by fellow board members as chairman of the National Board for Education Sciences, effective immediately.

The U.S. Senate approved President Obama’s nomination of Chard to the board in 2012. The 15-member board oversees and directs the work of the Institute of Education Sciences.

“Schools throughout the nation will benefit from David Chard’s leadership of this important board,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “His support of evidence-based education practices will help ensure that proven teaching strategies make their way to the classroom.”

One of the board’s functions is to advise the research priorities for the Institute of Education Sciences, the primary research and evaluation arm of the U.S. Department of Education.

The institute collects and analyzes education research data and funds researchers nationwide who are working to improve education outcomes for all students, particularly those at risk. In addition, the institute produces the Nation’s Report Card. As chair, Chard succeeds Bridget Terry Long from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she is academic dean and the Xander Professor of Education.

Supporting education must be more than rhetoric, Chard says. “We can’t talk about how important education is to the future of our country when we invest so little in knowing what works and for whom it works in the classroom,” he says. “Taxpayer dollars have to be wisely invested in education research and the results of research must be incorporated into our classrooms and schools.”

Written by Nancy George

> Read the full story from SMU News

 

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