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Meadows Wind Ensemble presents ode to Dallas in Cityscapes, Friday, March 3, 2017 at SMU

The dramatic transformations of Dallas’ skyline and development of the city’s Arts District are the inspirations for an upcoming concert by SMU’s Meadows Wind Ensemble.

Cityscapes is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 3, 2017 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. The program features Dallas Symphony Pops conductor Jeff Tyzik’s composition Cityscapes for Brass Quintet and Wind Ensemble and continues the “city” theme with Olivier Messiaen’s Couleurs de la cité celeste and Aaron Copland’s Quiet City.

The program will conclude with a performance of Stephen Paulus’ Concerto for Piano and Wind Ensemble, featuring Meadows graduate student Nick German on piano. The piece was written on commission for the MWE, and the performance will be a tribute to Paulus, a longtime friend of the Ensemble who passed away last year.

Tickets are $8 each for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

February 24, 2017|Calendar Highlights, News|

SMU’s 2017 Stanton Sharp Symposium takes on ‘The Russian Revolution of 1917: A Centennial View’ Feb. 22-23

2017 Stanton Sharp Symposium, 'The Russian Revolution of 1917, A Centennial View'

The global and historical impact of the Russian Revolution of February and October 1917 is the topic for the 2017 Stanton Sharp Symposium on Feb. 22-23, sponsored by SMU’s Clements Department of History.

The two-day event will examine the classic model for the so-called “color revolutions” of the 21st century and the fresh prominence of Russia and Russian history on the world stage. Leading scholars will explore new questions and share their original research on 1917. The schedule:

  • Reception, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22
  • “A Century After 1917: Arguing Over the Russian Revolution” with Laura Engelstein, Yale University, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22
  • “The Duma Committee, the Provisional Government, and the Birth of ‘Triple Power’ in the February Revolution” with Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, University of California-Santa Barbara, 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • “The Kerensky Cult” with Boris Kolonitsky, European University at St. Petersburg and Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • Panel discussion, 4:45-5:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • Reception, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • “Celebrating the Revolution in 2017: A Forecast” with Boris Kolonitsky, 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23
  • Concluding panel discussion, 7:45-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23

All lectures and presentations take place in Crum Auditorium, Collins Executive Education Center, Cox School of Business, and are free and open to the public.

For more information, contact the Clements Department of History, 214-768-2984, or visit smu.edu/history.

 

February 22, 2017|Calendar Highlights, News|

Site Spotlight: Handy tips from SMU Libraries as 2017 Fair Use Week begins

ARL Fair Use Week infographicThe Association of Research Libraries observes 2017 Fair Use Week Feb. 20-24, and SMU’s Central University Libraries is celebrating with handy resources for students and other University community members.

Dillon Wackerman, SMU’s Digital Repository librarian, has answered some questions about fair use in honor of the week, which is organized to “celebrate the important doctrines of fair use in the United States” and “promote and discuss the opportunities presented, celebrate successful stories and explain the doctrine.”

Share the link to spread the word.

> Read and share via the SMU CUL News blog

February 20, 2017|Site Spotlight|

Research: Hunting down cancer-causing viruses that hide from the immune system

Robert L. Harrod, Biology Lab ResearchSMU virologist and cancer researcher Robert L. Harrod has been awarded a $436,500 grant from the National Cancer Institute to further his lab’s research into how certain viruses cause cancers in humans.

Under two previous NCI grants, Harrod’s lab discovered that the human T-cell leukemia virus type-1, HTLV-1, and high-risk subtype human papillomaviruses, HPVs, share a common mechanism that plays a key role in allowing cancers to develop. Now the lab will search for the biological mechanism — a molecular target — to intervene to block establishment and progression of virus-induced cancers. The hope is to ultimately develop a chemotherapy drug to block the growth of those tumor cells in patients.

“The general theme of our lab is understanding the key molecular events involved in how the viruses allow cancer to develop,” said Harrod, an associate professor in SMU’s Department of Biological Sciences whose research focuses on understanding the molecular basis of viral initiation of cancer formation.

While HTLV-1 and HPV are unrelated transforming viruses and lead to very different types of cancers, they’ve evolved a similar mechanism to cooperate with genes that cause cancer in different cell types. The lab discovered that the two viruses tap a common protein that cooperates with cellular genes to help the viruses hide from the immune system.

That common protein, the p30 protein of HTLV-1, binds to a different protein in the cell, p53, which normally has the job of suppressing cancerous growth or tumor development. Instead, however, p30 manages to subvert p53’s tumor suppressor functions, which in turn activates pro-survival pathways for the virus.

From there, the virus can hide inside the infected cell for two to three decades while evading host immune-surveillance pathways. As the cell divides, the virus divides and replicates. Then ultimately the deregulation of gene expression by viral encoded products causes cancer to develop.

“They are essentially using a similar mechanism, p30, to deregulate those pathways from their normal tumor-suppressing function,” Harrod said.

— Margaret Allen

> Read more about Rob Harrod’s research at SMUResearch.com

February 17, 2017|For the Record, Research|

Perot Museum, SMU host ‘Past, Present and Future’ fossil lecture downtown on Thursday Feb. 23, 2017

SMU Scott-Hawkins Lecture and Perot Founders Circle Lecture invitationThe Perot Museum of Nature and Science and SMU invite the entire University community to a special event on Thursday, Feb. 23.

Scott Wing, curator of fossil plants at the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, will speak on “Past, Present & Future – The Truth Is In the Fossils.” A catered reception will precede the lecture at 6 p.m., with remarks at 6:30 p.m. Complimentary valet service is available.

Dr. Wing’s lecture is co-hosted by Dedman College’s Scott-Hawkins Lecture Series and the Perot Museum’s Founders Circle Lectures, and presented by Charles Schwab.

The event is free and requires an RSVP (two guests per response maximum). To RSVP or request additional guests, contact the Perot Museum, 214-756-5729.

February 17, 2017|Calendar Highlights, News|
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