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Calendar Highlights: Nov. 16, 2010

Worldly beats: Percussion and improvisation take center stage in this semester’s installment of the Meadows World Music Ensemble, directed by Jamal Mohamed. Exotic percussion instruments from Africa, Asia and the Middle East are prominently featured with more “Western” instruments like the vibraphone, keyboard and guitar. A mix of traditional works, original pieces and good old ‘jamming’ sessions is the order of the night. The performance is at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 16 in the Bob Hope Theatre in Meadows. Admission is free. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

Eric SundquistA Gilbert for the road: The SMU Department of English‘s final installment of the Fall 2010 Gilbert Lecture Series is almost here. This week’s speaker is Eric Sundquist (pictured), author and the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University. His lecture, “We Dreamed a Dream: Larry Ellison, Martin Luther King Jr., and Barack Obama,” covers the unfinished second novel of acclaimed author Larry Ellison, who in over 40 years of civil rights coverage unearthed a lot of truths about race in America, ranging from the MLK days to the Obama presidency. The reading is at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 18 in the Texana Room, DeGolyer Library. Admission is free. A reception precedes the reading at 6 p.m. For more information, visit the Gilbert Lecture Series website.

Break out the jazz hands: The Meadows Jazz Orchestra, directed by Akira Sato, will conduct an exploration of traditional large ensemble jazz pieces, as well as introducing new student and professional works into the mix – including pieces by Sato, other Meadows faculty and current jazz students. Admission is free for the performance, which begins at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 18 in the Bob Hope Theatre, Owen Arts Center. For more information, call 214-768-1951.

Sports: Basketball’s back!

Papa DiaMaybe this year?: Head Coach Matt Doherty’s men’s basketball team returns to make another stab at the March Madness brackets this year with a home opener against the Arkansas-Little Rock Trojans at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 12. Doherty’s team is hoping to make a comeback from a disappointing 14-17 campaign last year (7-9 C-USA) where they failed to make it into the 64-bracket tournament. SMU has six seniors this year with Ryan Harp, Tomasz Kwiatkowski, Myles Luttman, Collin Mangrum, Mike Walker and pre-season All C-USA conference selection forward Papa Dia (pictured) leading the charge. Contact 214-SMU-GAME for more information on tickets.

Seasons of glory: SMU’s women’s basketball team also gets things rolling this weekend as they look to achieve a fourth consecutive year of 20+ wins. (The Lady ‘Stangs went 20-11 last year.) Head Coach Rhonda Rompola‘s team looks to build on their successful run last year, where they entered the C-USA Tournament as a No. 3 seed, finished 10-6 in the conference and earned a bid in the WNIT tournament for the second consecutive season. Forward Delisha Willis returns to the court after missing last year with injuries. Sophomore Alisha Filmore was named as SMU’s starting PG after last season’s starter Brittany Gilliam graduated. SMU hosts Utah at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 12 at Moody Coliseum. For tickets, call 214-SMU-GAME.

Matt CeravoloSignings, signings everywhere: The men’s golf team was busy with signings this week for the upcoming seasons. Florida brothers Alec and Matthew Ceravolo and Texas native Sam Fidone were inked for the men’s team on Friday, Nov. 12. Matthew (pictured) has a 2008 Florida State Player of the Year trophy, a 2009 South Florida Player of the Year trophy, and is an AJGA All American. Alec was previously ranked in the top 10 of Florida players, has three top-20 AJGA finishes, and was named first team All-South Florida. Fidone, ranked No. 13 in Texas by Junior Golf Scoreboard, and was the 2010 Texas Junior Golf Tour Player Of The Year. All three have signed National Letters of Intent to play for SMU in 2011-12 under head coach Jay Loar.

No football this week as SMU takes a bye to prepare for their last home game against Marshall. They need to win one more to secure a bowl game for the BCS championship series.

SMU’s 2010 Fall Dance Concert here just in time

Fall Dance ConcertOne of the more popular methods of relieving stress during the dregs of the late semester is finally returning to campus, and not a moment too soon.

Meadow’s 2010 Fall Dance Concert, a congregation of the Divsion of Dance‘s skills, techniques, and of course, top-tier dancers, is back for a five-night revue. This year’s performances highlight contemporary and jazz works, including Pithecanthropus Erectus by bass legend Charlie Mangus, the duet Alraune by the Pilobolus Dance Theatre, and Adam Hougland‘s daring contemporary ballet, Beyond.

Also included are works by new SMU Jazz instructor and faculty member Millicent Johnnie and new works by internationally known choreographer William Soleau. (KERA recently published an article on Soleau’s works- you can find it here.)

The Fall Dance Concert will run for five performances- at 8 p.m. each night from Wednesday, Nov. 10 to Saturday, Nov. 13th, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 14th. All performances are in the Bob Hope Theatre at Meadows. Prices are $13 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $7 for faculty, staff and students. For more information on tickets, call 214-768-ARTS.

A list of the cast and crew of the Fall Dance Concert follows after the jump.
(Pictured, junior Jamal Jackson White and senior Kimberly Van Woesik perform Adam Hougland’s ballet Beyond.)

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Calendar Highlights: Nov. 9, 2010

Holy Land“Ring of Fire” it isn’t: The five spiritual pilgrimages to Israel undertaken by country legends Johnny and June Carter Cash and the effects on their songwriting and lives are taken into perspective by Shalom L. Goldman in the 2010 Nate and Ann Levine Endowed Lecture on Jewish Studies. Goldman, a professor of Hebrew and Middle Eastern Studies at Emory University, will cover how these trips ultimately changed the life of the notorious “Man in Black” and his wife, and how their later songs and lifestyle reflected these changes. The lecture is at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 9 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Admission is free. For more information, call 214-768-4478. (Pictured right: Johnny Cash’s album The Holy Land, which was inspired by the Cashes’ trips to Israel.)

History and fantasy collide: How best to establish a centuries-old religion with countless traditions in the New World? This question is put to the test in a new Meadows Museum-sponsored Comini Lecture, “Biblical Images, Historical Memory, and a Global Imagination: The Case of the Temple of the Jesuits in Quito, ca. 1700.” UT Professor of History Jorge Canizares-Esguerra (pictured) will speak on how new clerics in provinical Quito used ancient Biblical narratives to further understand themselves and the rise of the Jesuit order as a global sect. The lecture is at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 11 in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. Admission is free. For more information, call 214-768-2698.

EsguerraOpera FFA returns!: Despite a notable absence of SMU’s Opera Free For All performances during the Halloween weekend, the Meadows troupe of actors and singers are coming back with a performance all about the heart in their new Brown Bag piece, “Tell Me All About Love!” The performance will be a mix of song, poetry and music about all the wildly differing emotions and circumstances that come with being in love. The performance is at noon on Friday, Nov. 12 in the Bob Hope Theatre Lobby, Owen Arts Center. Admission is free (and walk-in).

Work on your scribble: Meadows Museum’s last “Drawing from the Masters” workshop of the season features artist Ian O’Brien as the instructor for an informal skills session. Instruction will be drawn from specific works in the Meadows collection, and a variety of techniques and skills will be covered. The event takes place at 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14 at the Meadows Museum. The workshop is from age 15 to adults of any age. Drawing materials will be available, but participants are encouraged to bring their own writing materials. Attendance is limited to 20 on a first-come, first-serve basis and is free with regular museum admission. For more information, call 214-768-4677.

Sports: Padron & Co. back on the winning track

Aldrick RobinsonBreaking Tulane: Sophomore QB Kyle Padron‘s epic 82-yard touchdown pass to senior WR Aldrick Robinson (pictured) took the cake in SMU’s much-needed 31-17 smackdown of C-USA rival Tulane on Saturday, Oct. 30. The Mustangs looked shaky for much of the game, ending the 3rd quarter down by a touchdown. However, the Mustangs notched 21 points in the 4th quarter, including a nifty interception by junior DB Chris Banjo for a touchback. SMU’s next game is at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6 in El Paso, Texas – where they hope to make UTEP their next victim on the way to redemption from a torrid 3-game losing streak.

One more shot: Former SMU men’s basketball players Mouhammad Faye and Bamba Fall, both graduates, have been selected in this year’s 2010 NBA Developmental League Draft. Class of ’09 graduate Fall, a former two-time All-C-USA Defensive Team selection, was drafted 97th overall to the Reno Bighorns. Class of ’10 graduate Faye finished 22nd in C-USA point standings with 10.7 points per game and was drafted 39th overall to the Rio Grande Valley Vipers. More than 1 of every 5 NBA players has honed their skills in the D-League prior to being called up to the big leagues.

Craig HillMarta Lesniak continued her seemingly invincible run of accolades and awards as she was named C-USA’s Tennis Athlete of the Month on Tuesday, Nov. 2. For those who aren’t already aware, the No. 22-ranked Wroclaw, Poland native built a 10-2 record (6-1 against ranked opponents) as she advanced to the quarterfinal round of the ITA All-American Riviera Tournament and the title match of the ITA Regional. Her only loss to a ranked opponent came in a third-round tiebreaker to No. 7 Denise Dy of Washington at the quarterfinal match of the Riviera Tournament. As a result of her quarterfinal success, Lesniak has already qualified for the ITA National Indoor Championships, which will begin on Thursday, Nov. 4 in Flushing, New York.

Winding down: After garnering an incredible 14-1-0 record in the season thus far, the men’s soccer team (6-1-0 in C-USA play) goes for one more regular-season win against the FIU Golden Panthers (7-9-0, 1-6-0 C-USA) at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 5 in Miami, Florida. The Mustangs have maintained a vice-grip on the No. 5 ranking in the NSCAA/HendricksCar.com national rankings, and added one more trophy to their impressive season collection this week as senior goalkeeper and captain Craig Hill (pictured) was named C-USA Defensive Player Of The Week for an impressive 2-0 shutout of Memphis at SMU’s final home game on Saturday, Oct. 30. SMU will head to Memphis Nov. 10-14 to participate in the 2010 Conference USA Championship, for which they hold the No. 1 seed and thus have a first-round bye. They will play the winner of the No. 4-No.5 quarterfinal match.

Calendar Highlights: Nov. 2, 2010

David Cotterrell, 'Casualties Arriving at Bastion by Chinook,' 2007Art and war: British artist David Cotterrell will speak in this week’s Visiting Artist Lecture at the Meadows School of the Arts. Cotterrell, a professor of art at Sheffield Hallam University in England, will talk about the usage of war and medicine in art and public practices. Cotterrell received a War Artist Commission from The Wellcome Trust in 2007, and he also spent one month living with a British Army Joint Forces Medical Group in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. The event is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 3, in Room 3527, Greer Garson Theatre (the 3rd floor screening room). For more information, call 214-768-2489. (Right, Casualties arriving at Bastion by Chinook, taken in 2007 by David Cotterrell.)

The medieval life: Associate Professor of Art History Pamela Patton will discuss one of the most influential cultural clashes of the medieval era in a Meadows Museum-sponsored lecture, “Living with Others in Medieval Spain: ‘Conviviencia’ and Its Afterlife.” The lecture covers how the congregation of Muslims, Christians, and Jews affected art, architecture and literature from the medieval period to the early modern times, and how the culture shock still remains relevant today. The event will begin at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4, in the Bob Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. For more information, call 214-768-4677.

Patient’s rights discussed: George Annas of Boston University School of Health will discuss the legal and ethical implications of the death-penalty doctoral team in the Embrey Human Rights Program’s ongoing Death Penalty Matters Series. Annas, the William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Law, Bioethics and Human Rights at Boston (and a professor at the BU School of Medicine and School of Law to boot), has been writing a regular feature since 1991 on “Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights” for the New England Journal of Medicine. The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. For more information, contact Sherry Aikman, 214-768-8347.

Humanity and media collide: The Perkins School’s Center for the Study of Latino/a Christianity and Religions tackles a tough subject in their upcoming Interdisciplinary Dialogue Event, “Latinos, Religion, and the Media.” Moderators Anthony Cortese, professor of sociology, and Maria Dixon, associate professor of corporate communication and public affairs, investigate and discuss how the media portrays religion with concern to Latino cultures and connections. On what ethical level can we talk about Latino immigration and Latino heritage and religion at the same time? Are illegal or legal immigrants Christian? Are we a Christian nation? Can churches provide sanctuary to undocumented workers? These tough questions and more are covered in a 7 p.m. audience discussion Monday, Nov. 8 in Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. Admission is free, but RSVPs are required. For more information, call 214-768-8436.

Scary good times for SMU this Halloween season

Black cat and Halloween jack-o-lanternAnd now, a quick round-up of various Halloween 2010 events around SMU:

• It’s time to show your knife skills again as the Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports is hosting a Pumpkin Carving Competition this Thursday, Oct. 28. The competition begins at 6:00 p.m. at the Falls, where judges will hand out prizes to the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd best carvings.

• The SMU Preschool and Child Care Center‘s “Mini Mustangs” will host their annual Halloween Parade at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 29. This year’s march of costume-clad toddlers will go from Hawk Hall to the Flagpole and back. Faculty and staff are invited to join in handing out candy to the kids along the way. The SMU Police Department will also be participating.

SMU-In-Plano will host a Halloween potluck lunch at noon Friday, Oct. 29. The party is in Room 118, Building 4. RSVP to Sharla Agnew before 5 p.m. Thursday if you’re interested.

• Can you wear a costume and climb in it as well? If so, you should consider the Midnight Cosmic Costume Climbing challenge at the Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports. Attendants will compete for best costume (that they can climb in) and food, drinks, and a live DJ will be provided. The event begins at 11 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 29 and will continue until 1 a.m. Bringing your own harness – shoes are optional, as Dedman also has rentals. For any questions, call the Climbing Wall at 214-768-9917.

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 27, 2010

Charles CurranChurch controversy: SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility has promoted the upcoming lecture by Charles Curran as the story of a man raised within the Catholic church who famously clashed with many of its leaders on just about every social issue possible, including premarital sex, masturbation, contraception, abortion, homosexuality, divorce, euthanasia, and in vitro fertilization. The tipping point came for Curran in 1986, where he was ousted from teaching at Catholic University of America schools despite having tenure. (The man responsible for Curran getting the boot? Josef Ratzinger, now known as Pope Benedict XVI.) Curran (right), now SMU’s Elizabeth Scurlock University Professor of Human Values, speaks about his challenges as a “black sheep” of the Catholic family in “The U.S. Catholic Bishops and Abortion Legislation: A Critique from within the Church” at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 28 in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom. For more information, call 214-768-4255.

Service of Memory: The University’s annual Service of Memory will take place at noon Thursday, Oct. 28 in Perkins Chapel. The service honors SMU community members who have passed away during the past year and is organized by the Office of the Chaplain and Religious Life and Perkins School of Theology.

A future for books? Bridwell Library, DeGolyer Library and Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon are hosting a special lecture by the Director of Rare Book School and University of Virginia professor Michael F. Suarez, S. J. on the future stock of old-fashioned books and their “digital surrogate” replacements. In this lecture, Suarez will show the ways in which our changing technological and cultural times are determining the way we view text formation and comprehension itself. The lecture is at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 28 in the Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall. Free parking is available for this event only in the Meadows Museum Parking Garage. Attendance is free, but RSVPs are required – respond online or call 214-768-3483.

Prado at the Meadows logoSpanish flair: SMU’s Meadows Museum hosts a faculty/staff reception celebrating its “Prado at the Meadows” partnership with Madrid’s renowned Prado Museum. Freixenet wines, hors d’oeuvres and Spanish guitar music will be provided. The party is scheduled for 4:30-6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29 in the Museum.

Modern MSO: SMU’s Meadows Symphony Orchestra takes a stroll through more (relatively) modern composers for its second show of the season, with pieces by Soviet-born Giya Kancheli, French composer Henri Tomasi, and Czech composer Antonin Dvorak. Dallas Symphony player and faculty member John Kitzman is the featured trombone soloist on the Tomasi piece, aptly titled Concerto for Trombone. The performances begin at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29 and at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 31. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information call 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

Sports: Mustangs call for Blue-Out at green game

Zach BarnesTulsa seeing ‘Red’: In the first game of a color-spree week, Mustang soccer fans are asked to wear red to No. 6 SMU’s conference battle with No. 17 Tulsa. SMU has a long history of dominating Tulsa (24-6-3 all-time), and the winning trend was continued last year as the Mustangs defeated Tulsa 3-2 on Oct. 21, 2009. SMU (11-1-0, 3-1-0 C-USA), fresh off consecutive victories against Marshall and South Carolina (2-1, 3-1 respectively) holds on to its No. 6 ranking in the NSCAA/HendricksCar.com rankings before the Tulsa matchup, which is at 7:00 p.m. on Wed, Oct. 20 at Westcott Field. Also of note, freshman midfielder Zach Barnes (right) took the C-USA Offensive Player of the Week award and was named to the TopDrawerSoccer.com National Team of the Week for an impressive performance during the week of Oct. 4-10 where he netted two crucial goals, including an overtime game-winner.

Houston feeling ‘Blue’: What was supposed to be the true football rivalry match for the conference lead appears instead to be a business-as-usual game for the Mustangs (4-3, 3-0 C-USA), looking for a relatively easy win after a rough 28-21 loss to the Navy Midshipmen on Oct. 16. Houston, playing crippled due to the loss of their starting QB Case Keenum, suffered an embarrassing loss to recent SMU punching bag Rice (34-31, also on Oct. 16) and has a two-game losing streak. Fans are asked to switch out Wednesday’s reds for a set of blues for the 2:30 Homecoming game on Saturday, Oct. 3 at Ford Stadium.

Dana PowellGreen is the word: SMU’s Homecoming game vs. Houston has also been designated as the first carbon-neutral game in Texas. In an effort to raise awareness of environmental issues, particularly the damaging effects of too much carbon dioxide, SMU has purchased renewable energy and carbon credits that will roughly equal the carbon and energy expended by every related sports facility or group for Saturday’s game. Mustang fans also are encouraged to donate old shoes to be collected by the Dallas-based Shoe Bank, a nonprofit that provides footwear for the homeless, refugee organizations, battered women shelters, and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas. Most of the children’s shoes will end up in Haiti to protect its native children from deadly parasites.

Powell breaks 1K: Junior outside hitter Dana Powell (right) cracked the 1,000 mark in both career kills and digs in the volleyball team’s five-set victory over Marshall on Sunday, Oct. 17. Powell’s 18 kills and 27 digs moved her into the thousand-thousand club, which only six previous SMU students have attained. with 1,011 kills and 1,009 digs, Powell joins senior Kathryn Wilkerson as the only current C-USA players to achieve the feat. SMU is now at 16-4, which is a record-high for the program after 20 games. They currently hold second place in the conference (8-1 C-USA) and will play road matches at Rice and Houston at 7:00 p.m. on both Friday, Oct. 22 and Saturday, Oct. 23, respectively.

Meadows Theatre rolls out ‘Three Repertory Plays’ Oct. 19-31

Rehearsal photo from the SMU Meadows Theatre production of 'Melancholy Play' by Sarah RuhlThe 2010-11 Meadows Theatre season continues as the Division of Theatre debuts a trio of plays directed by students and professors. “Three Repertory Shows” runs Oct. 19-31 in the Margo Jones Theatre, Owen Arts Center.

The first work of rising playwright and 2010 Pulitzer Prize nominee Sarah Ruhl opens at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19. Melancholy Play, directed by senior theatre major Joel Heinrich, tells the story of Tilly – a Felliniesque heroine whose sorrowful demeanor fascinates her more cheerful neighbors and makes strangers fall in love with her. Things get complicated, however, when Tilly inexplicably becomes happy. Additional performances are scheduled for 8 p.m. Oct. 22 and Oct. 28, as well as performances at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Oct. 30.

Stephen Adly GuirgisIn Arabia, We’d All Be Kings goes up at 8 p.m. Oct. 20, 23 and 27 and at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 31. The play follows a group of wayward individuals, their local bar, and the cost of living on the streets in Hell’s Kitchen during the Rudy Giuliani era. Kings is directed by senior theatre student Christopher McCreary.

Associate Professor of Theatre Jim Crawford directs The Secretaries, written by the Five Lesbian Brothers. Weight requirements, Slim-Fast-only diets and occasional murder as therapy are all in a day’s work for the titular cubicle denizens in this dark satire on the idea of women as “man-haters.” Performances begin at 8 p.m. Oct. 21; 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 24; and 8 p.m. Oct. 26 and 29.

Tickets are $7 each for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information, call 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS).

(Interested in an explanation for a handle like the Five Lesbian Brothers? Learn more about Lisa Kron, acclaimed playwright and creator of the FLB.)

Right, sophomore theatre major Janielle Kastner as Tilly and senior theatre major Zach Gamble as Frank in the Meadows Theatre production of Melancholy Play by Sarah Ruhl, directed by senior theatre major Joel Heinrich. Photo by Linda Blase.

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