For the Record: Aug. 27, 2010

Asteroid 213629 BinfordLewis Binford, Anthropology, Dedman College, has been honored with an asteroid named for him by the International Astronomical Union. The naming citation for Asteroid (213629) Binford reads, in part, “[Lewis Binford] was one of the main figures behind the development of the ‘New Archaeology’ or ‘Processual Archaeology,’ the major theoretical and methodological improvements to archaeology taking place during the 1960s to 1980s.”

The object was discovered in November 2004 on images taken in August 2002 by the 1.2-meter Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) telescope at Mt. Palomar, California. It is an MB II asteroid, orbiting between Mars and Jupiter with an orbital period of 4 years, a minimum distance to the sun of 2.38 astronomical units (AU) and an estimated size of slightly over 1 kilometer. See the asteroid’s 3D orbit diagram at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory website. (Top right, a composite of three images documenting the asteroid’s discovery, showing it as a tiny moving dot. Click the image for a larger version. Images courtesy of NEAT/NASA.)

Lynne Jackson, Music, Meadows School of the Arts, has received a 2010 Meritorious Achievement Award from the Texas Bandmasters Association (TBA). TBA President and SMU professor Brian Merrill presented the award during the organization’s annual convention and clinic in July in San Antonio. The award honors “those who have made a difference in the lives of band students in Texas” and “who exemplify the qualities of a good band director.”

Cat with serape, ca. 1860Norwick Center for Digital Services, Central University Librares, has received a $20,000 TexTreasures grant to digitize, catalog and upload 2,500 items into the University’s Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs digital collection. The annual competitive grant program is designed to help member libraries make their special collections more accessible. Funding is available for projects that involve cataloging, indexing, and digitizing local materials with statewide significance.

NCDS and DeGolyer Library will digitize 19th-century photographs from the Lawrence T. Jones Texas photography collection . This collection, which contains 5,000 photographs, depicts Texans from a variety of cultural groups: Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, and American Indian, as well as locations from all regions of the state. (Bottom right, Cat posed with Mexican serape, ca. 1860 from the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs digital collection.)

About Kathleen Tibbetts

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