Category Archives: National Security and Civil Liberties

How Far to Capital Punishment?

In late February in Chardon, Ohio, a teenage student of Lake Academy Alternative School, opened fire in the Chardon High School cafeteria, killing 1 and wounding 4. The teen gunman was chased out of the building by the assistant football … Continue reading

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Can We Find the Root of Radicalization?

Amine El Khalif, a Moroccan citizen living illegally in the United States, was arrested by the FBI on Friday 17 February, on his way to execute a suicide bombing attack at the U.S. Capitol.  FBI Director Robert Mueller reports El … Continue reading

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Presidential Prerogative

When reflecting on questions of National Security and Civil Liberties, it is important to look at the mesh of ethics within the political realm.  One of the most important, and pertinent, aspects of the concept of civil liberties is the … Continue reading

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Which Came First?

After attending the Tower Center’s conference on civil liberties versus national security, I found my mind reframing the relationship between these two important and impactful issues.  The placement of the word versus between the two terms implies war, which is … Continue reading

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2012, National Security, and the Elections

With the Iowa Caucus now behind us, the election cycle is in full swing. The economy, specifically “jobs,” will probably continue to dominate the news cycle and the debates. The ethical implications of corporate greed, high unemployment rates, lending practices, … Continue reading

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