Dedman College undergraduate student and champion golfer Bryson DeChambeau feels no pressure to turn pro, wants to complete Physics degree

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: August 26, 2015

UNIVERSITY PARK — Education has been crucial in getting SMU golfer Bryson DeChambeau to where he is today, so he was adamant Wednesday that he will eventually get his degree.

When that might happen, however, is a bit of a question after the 21-year-old senior became only the fifth man in history to win the NCAA tournament and the U.S. Amateur in the same year.

“I plan to stay in college and complete my degree,” DeChambeau said. “Whether I get it done this year, I’m not 100 percent sure.”

DeChambeau said he could finish up his major in the first semester and then fill in with online courses, but he said he will think long and hard before he eventually commits to turning pro. Next up is the Walker Cup, Sept. 12-13 in England. If he doesn’t turn pro, he will receive invitations to next year’s Masters, U.S. Open, British Open and U.S. Amateur. READ MORE

Student draws inspiration from role in organizing national black fiction writer’s literary retreat

SMU News

River-at-kimbilio-retreat-3

DALLAS (SMU) — When SMU creative writing director David Haynes started planning this summer’s Kimbilio Literary Retreat, a weeklong excursion to SMU-in-Taos for African American fiction writers, he knew he’d need a helping hand.

Where to look? He quickly made up his mind to recruit help from his spring intermediate fiction writing class.

“Haynes offered me a work-study position because he needed help with the Kimbilio website and their social media platforms,” says 20-year-old interdisciplinary studies junior River Ribas. “I said, ‘I’m young. I can help you with that.’”

Ribas didn’t realize it then, but the job description would include a lot more than social media duty by the summer’s end. READ MORE

Congrats to senior Bryson DeChambeau as he advanced to the U.S. Amateur final

New York Times

Originally Posted: August 22, 2015

OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. — SMU senior Bryson DeChambeau advanced to the U.S. Amateur final, putting him a victory away from becoming the fifth player to win the tournament and NCAA individual title in the same year.

DeChambeau, from Clovis, California, beat Southern California sophomore Sean Crocker 4 and 3 in the semifinals Saturday at Olympia Fields. He will face Virginia junior Derek Bard of New Hartford, New York, in the 36-hole final Sunday. Bard topped Japan’s Kenta Konishi 3 and 2.

“It’ll be a fun battle,” DeChambeau said. “If I can stay in the moment, I’ll be all right.”

Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996) and Ryan Moore (2004) are the only players to sweep the NCAA and Amateur titles in a season. READ MORE

SMU Adventures, Project Impact and Education in Guatemala

SMU Adventures

Originally Posted: August 10, 2015

Follow Jennifer, Maguire Fellow in Guatemala.

Jennifer is a senior majoring in human rights and public policy. She was awarded a Maguire and Irby Family Foundation Public Service Fellowship for summer 2015 from the Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility at SMU for her work in community development. READ MORE.

Follow Jewel on SMU Adventures

Jewel is a sophomore majoring in biology and environmental science in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. A member of the University Honors Program, she is the recipient of the SMU Founders Scholarship and Dedman College Scholarship. During summer 2012, she also received a Richter Fellowship to conduct research at SMU-in-Taos, where she will update “A Guide to the Trees of the Navajo Country,” a 1940s bulletin written to teach Navajo students to manage and identify the trees in their area. She is using a variety of resources to update locations, scientific names, Navajo medicinal uses and other characteristics of the trees. READ MORE

Award-winning Dedman College student loves SMU traditions

Year of the Student Blog

Elishah Ramos ’15 was one of 10 students who received the “M” award, SMU’s highest commendation, at the University’s 18th annual Honors Convocation, in April.

25955D_0561-680x451“I’m pretty excited about it. It was a surprise for me. I know so many other students who work so hard for the University and are equally deserving of this award. So it’s humbling for me to be acknowledged in this way,” says Elishah, who also has served as an SMU Ambassador and is the first in his family to go to college.

An esteemed University tradition, Honors Convocation is a celebration of academic excellence achieved by SMU students. And Elishah, a double major in markets and culture and Spanish and a human rights minor, loves traditions. He also served as a Peruna handler, in charge of the SMU mascot during athletic events. READ MORE

Dedman College students receive prestigious national fellowships and awards

Congratulations to the Dedman College students awarded prestigious national fellowships and awards during the 2014-15 academic year, including Fulbright Grants and a fellowship to the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress. These students include:

Fulbright Scholar:

Whitney Goodwin
Michaela Wallerstedt
Kandi Doming

Institute for Responsible Citizenship Scholar:

Garrett Fisher

Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress Presidential Fellow:

Tracy Nelson

National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates

Nicole Hartman

READ MORE

 

Biology major accepted to Harvard Medical School

SMU Daily Campus

Originally Posted: May 5, 2015

Senior Janice Kim presented her dissertation, “p53-Dependent survival signaling may promote oncogene-activation during viral carcinogenesis,” in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Departmental Distinction Program on May 1.

Kim has been working on her thesis for about three and a half years. She chose her topic during the start of her first year after attending a meeting at the premed office.

“All the professors came, talked about their research and gave you a feel for the opportunities undergraduates could take,” Kim said. “I chose the professor I liked the best and that was Dr. Harrod.”

Robert Harrod, Ph.D, teaches biological sciences at SMU. His research interests include molecular biology, pathogenesis of human retroviruses and mechanisms of viral carcinogenesis.

Kim further explains why she chose Dr. Harrod out of all the other biology research professors.

“I liked his field of research about leukemia and more specifically how leukemia develops,” Kim said. “I approached him fall semester freshman year, introduced myself and said I was interested in researching with him.”

Most professors usually select upperclassmen to work with in their specified field of research. However, Harrod acknowledged her interest despite her younger age.

“After I expressed my interest, I wasn’t expecting anything because they usually take upperclassmen,” Kim said. “But he said ‘okay, why don’t you start now?’ I started spring semester and I’ve been with him ever since.”

Over three years later, her undergraduate research is complete. In layman’s terms, Kim summarizes her dissertation:

“My dissertation is about how a virus Dr. Harrod is studying, human leukemia t-cell virus type 1, causes leukemia,” Kim said. “The proteins of that virus, like p30 and p53, deregulate, or cause the over expression of cellular proteins to go awry in the pathway, and that leads to adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma.”

Kim credits part of her success to Dr. Harrod. She says he pushed her to do things beyond the limit, like applying for the Hamilton scholarship to further her undergraduate research.

“I love Dr. Harrod as my mentor; he’s always been there for me if I had questions and I could always go to him for anything,” Kim said. “He’s been a very supportive mentor and the best kind of mentor you can have as a research professor.”

Harrod filled out one of her recommendation letters when she applied for medical school. Kim applied to multiple schools in Texas and out-of-state schools like Harvard.

Kim has been accepted to Harvard Medical School and will start graduate school in the coming fall semester. She said she chose the school because she was interested in their diversity of experiences and soft-science research, like biomedical anthropology, which is her minor. If she chooses to get her M.D. PhD in biomedical anthropology, she hopes to pursue a career in global health.

“I’m really interested in Global Health and I can credit part of that to Dr. Bing who teaches global health class here at SMU,” Kim said. “In five years I can see myself still learning and eventually take my skills and apply them- go abroad and see from start to finish the development of global health in an area.”

Kim says her acceptance to Harvard Medical School has not changed her persona in any way.

“You’re not going to change because of some physical validation or from getting accepted into a certain school- you’re going to still be the same person and have the same capabilities as you did before,” Kim said.

Kim will graduate this May. As her journey at SMU comes to a close, she sums up her undergraduate experience.

“I would like to thank everyone who’s impacted me: my family, my friends and my mentors: Dr. Harrod, Dr. Bing, Dr. Smith-Morris,” Kim said. “I realized in college I learned a lot in the classroom, but also through outside experiences, and I’m glad I found that at SMU.” READ MORE

Dedman College student honored for raising over $104,000 for SMU’s Relay For Life.

USA TODAY
Originally Posted: April 19, 2015
By: Lauren M. Castle

After another successful year, SMU tops Relay for Life fundraising

The American Cancer Society estimates that the event raised $176,400 in total.

Dr. Gordy Klatt created Relay For Life in 1985 in Tacoma, Washington. He wanted to raise money for the American Cancer Society’s efforts to end the disease. Since then, the event has raised more than $5 billion.

The Relay consists of an overnight walk and on-site fundraising activities and entertainment. Over 50 teams held on-site fundraisers at this year’s Relay, which included a cupcake sale and a dunk tank.

Relay is special to SMU senior Katie Schaible, who lost her father to cancer. Schailbe’s father died from melanoma when she was in high school. She believes the event allows her to honor her father’s memory.

“This has been a really meaningful way to fight back and to meet other people who have gone through similar experiences,” said Schaible, majoring in dance and international studies.

The American Cancer Society recently held a competition for its top 25 collegiate chapters to raise $250,000 collectively in three days. The chapters raised $315,654 in total. This year, SMU raised $45,534, the top amount in the country. Last year, SMU raised $29,000 in a 72-hour competition.

Schaible believes college students should be more aware of cancer. For her, Relay allows her to highlight how melanoma can be preventable.

“I feel like a lot of college students feel immune to the experience of cancer because cancer itself is a lot more common in older people,” said Schaible. “But it’s so true that at some point in everybody’s life they will encounter cancer in some way.”

More men than women will die of melanoma this year, according to the American Cancer Society. It is estimated that more than 40,000 men will be diagnosed with the skin cancer.

SMU’s Relay For Life raised more than $150,000 last year. Schaible was honored at this year’s event for being the top participant. She has raised more than $104,000 during her time at SMU. READ MORE