Professor Kunovich, Sociology, Recognized at Hilltop Excellence Awards Ceremony

Professor Sheri Kunovich received the Extra Mile Award from the Students for New Learning. Students for New Learning is an SMU-chartered student organization for students with ADHD or learning differences. The group meets monthly to provide support, learn tips and strategies, plan fun events, and works to increase campus understanding on the topic of learning differences.

http://blog.smu.edu/forum/2016/04/19/smu-recognizes-outstanding-achievement-at-2015-16-hilltop-excellence-awards-honors-convocation/

Gender Gap in Political Knowledge Persists in Poland, New Research by Sheri L. Kunovich

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After controlling for political interest, previous voting behavior, and socio-economic controls, women in Poland are found to be less knowledgeable than men about political leaders. However, religious attendance is found to increase women’s political knowledge but not men’s.

READ MORE about Sheri Kunovich

Congratulations to Markets and Culture Alumna Kelly Sayres

MKCL Alumni Update: Kelly Sayres

Kelly Sayres will be pursuing a Master’s degree from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education in Technology, Innovation, and Education starting Fall 2016. Kelly graduated in 2012 and has been teaching at an impoverished elementary school in rural Central Texas.

Sociology alumna awarded Dedman Law Distinguished Alumni

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In early February, A. Shonn Evans Brown was honored as one of five Dedman Law Distinguished Alumni of 2016. She gives back regularly to SMU by meeting with current sociology undergraduate students as well as serving as a mentor to Dedman law school students. We are honored to have her in our community of active alumni.

Decline in Democratic Oversight in City Budgets, New Research by L. Owen Kirkpatrick

While the wave of urban fiscal distress following the Great Recession resembles local fiscal crises of the past, two factors distinguish the current period. First, city budgets are thoroughly financialized—dominated by speculative and volatile debt arrangements—such that local crisis is now intertwined with financial market instability. Second, local fiscal politics are increasingly removed from democratic oversight and control, hindering the capacity of residents to protect and rebuild their communities. READ MORE: http://pas.sagepub.com/content/44/1/45?etoc

Sociology Students Meet the Steampunk Poet

Students enrolled in Dr. Nancy Campbell’s SOCI 4335: 2016_SOCI4335_SteampunkSocial Movements and Collective Behavior course had the opportunity to meet Steve Sanders, a Steampunk poet. Mr. Sanders provided the class with a rich history and description of the Steampunk community (Steampunk involves 19th Century dress and literature with a Sci-Fi twist) and shared several of his original poems

Brita Andercheck’s teaching assignment top 10 resource among Sociologists

Originally Posted: February 1, 2016

Sociology visiting professor Brita Andercheck‘s teaching resource, Education and Conflict Perspective: A College Admissions Committee Activity is among the top 10 most downloaded teaching resources of 2015.

The resource can be found in the TRAILS database on the American Sociological Association (ASA) website.

NYU Press Announces Dr. Anne Lincoln’s new book

NYU PRESS

Originally Posted: January 28, 2016

Failing Families, Failing Science
Work-Family Conflict in Academic Science

Work life in academia might sound like a dream: summers off, year-long sabbaticals, the opportunity to switch between classroom teaching and research. Yet, when it comes to the sciences, life at the top U.S. research universities is hardly idyllic. Based on surveys of over 2,000 junior and senior scientists, both male and female, as well as in-depth interviews, Failing Families, Failing Science examines how the rigors of a career in academic science makes it especially difficult to balance family and work.

Ecklund and Lincoln paint a nuanced picture that illuminates how gender, individual choices, and university and science infrastructures all play a role in shaping science careers, and how science careers, in turn, shape family life. They argue that both men and women face difficulties, though differently, in managing career and family. While women are hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science, the institution of science—and academic science, in particular—is not accommodating, possibly not even compatible, for either women or men who want to raise families. Perhaps most importantly, their research reveals that early career academic scientists struggle considerably with balancing their work and family lives. This struggle may prevent these young scientists from pursuing positions at top research universities—or further pursuing academic science at all— a circumstance that comes at great cost to our national science infrastructure. In an era when advanced scientific research and education is more important than ever, Failing Families, Failing Science presents a compelling inside look at the world of the university scientists who make it possible—and what universities and national science bodies can do to make a difference in their lives. READ MORE