12 Dedman College professors receive 2018-19 Sam Taylor Fellowships

SMU Forum Originally Posted: December 15, 2017 Twenty-five SMU faculty members have received 2018-19 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry. The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research, “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.” Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation and the project’s sensitivity to value questions [...]

By | 2017-12-18T10:03:21+00:00 December 18th, 2017|Anthropology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, Physics, Psychology, Statistical Science, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on 12 Dedman College professors receive 2018-19 Sam Taylor Fellowships

George Holden, Psychology, spanking children can lead to relationship violence later, according to a recent study

Fox 4 Originally Posted: December 5, 2017 Parents who believe in “spare the rod, spoil the child” might be setting their children up to become violent toward future partners, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of Pediatrics. “We asked 758 kids between 19 and 20 years old how often they had been spanked, slapped or struck with an object as form of punishment when they were younger,” said the study’s lead author, Jeff Temple, an associate professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “Kids who said they had experienced corporal punishment were more likely to have recently committed dating violence.” This result, he said, held up even when contributing factors such as sex, age, parental education, ethnicity and childhood abuse were [...]

By | 2017-12-12T08:19:59+00:00 December 6th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on George Holden, Psychology, spanking children can lead to relationship violence later, according to a recent study

Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology, has tips for parents of college students on Good Morning Texas

Good Morning Texas Originally Posted: August 10, 2017 How to land the helicopter: SMU Psychology Professor Chrystyna Kouros has tips for parents of college students on Good Morning Texas. Watch: http://www.wfaa.com/entertainment/television/programs/good-morning-texas/landing-a-helicopter-parent/463345812  

By | 2017-08-10T08:51:54+00:00 August 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology, has tips for parents of college students on Good Morning Texas

Having an attractive husband can trigger dieting problems for women

NewsShopper Originally Posted: July 24, 2017 A handsome husband can be bad for women's health by triggering dangerous dieting, according to new research. Yet unsurprisingly the same does not apply to men. Even if their wife is a stunner, they feel no pressure to look after themselves. The findings show a partner's looks can be a driving force behind the desire to seek a slim body - but only for women. Psychologist Tania Reynolds said: "The results reveal having a physically attractive husband may have negative consequences for wives, especially if those wives are not particularly attractive." But that extra motivation to diet did not exist among women judged more attractive than their husbands. As for men they are prone to letting themselves go whether [...]

By | 2017-07-28T07:53:56+00:00 July 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Having an attractive husband can trigger dieting problems for women

Researchers find correlation between attractiveness and dieting behaviors

WTXL 27 Originally Posted: July 25, 2017 How attractive do you see yourself compared to your significant other? A recent study by Florida State researchers shows your answer to that may have a bigger effect than you think, especially when it comes to dieting behaviors. Researchers had each participant complete a lengthy questionnaire, focusing in part on their desire to diet or have a thin body. A full-body photograph was taken of every participant and rated on a scale of 1 to 10. WATCH

By | 2017-07-25T11:00:22+00:00 July 25th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Researchers find correlation between attractiveness and dieting behaviors

Congratulations to Semi Ojeleye selected 37th overall in the 2017 NBA draft by the Boston Celtics!

College Sports: SportsDay Congratulations to Semi Ojeleye (SMU Forward and Psychology major) selected 37th overall in the 2017 NBA draft by the Boston Celtics! #PonyUp! More on Semi here: https://youtu.be/K_ssdlziI5c  

By | 2017-06-23T07:38:59+00:00 June 23rd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Psychology|Comments Off on Congratulations to Semi Ojeleye selected 37th overall in the 2017 NBA draft by the Boston Celtics!

In Dallas’ Hispanic communities, fear seeps into everyday routines

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: May 30, 2017 This is an excerpt of a Dallas Morning News article. To read the full article click here.   Trying to feel safe Chrystyna Kouros, an assistant psychology professor at Southern Methodist University, said the fear spreading through many Hispanic communities alters more than just routines. Kouros said the angst can also affect the way people sleep and how families interact with each other. “If you don’t feel safe, your sleep is disrupted. You are not able to perform at your potential and your capacity,” Kouros said. She added that children whose families may be affected by this type of stress may have a harder time focusing in the classroom. “You may want to go to school, but [...]

By | 2017-05-31T11:47:26+00:00 June 7th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on In Dallas’ Hispanic communities, fear seeps into everyday routines

SMU Dedman College alumnus Stephen Poulin ’12 starts apparel company to help veterans

The Beacon- Wicked Local  Originally Posted: April 26, 2017 With a logo that couples the East India Company symbol during the Revolutionary War with the Navy SEAL trident, Tea Party Rebels is more than a tribute to the patriotic, rebellious Boston colonists in 1773 and their defiant act against British-imposed taxation. The new business weaves the New England rebellious spirit into its clothing-- which benefits today’s patriots though various charity organizations. Spearheading it all is Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Class of 2008 graduate, Stephen Poulin, who has launched Tea Party Rebels LLC, his own apparel company created to benefit veterans, active servicemen and servicewomen and also first responders through a portion of the sales. Tea Party Rebels sells clothing that’s printed by a former Navy SEAL. Poulin, [...]

By | 2017-05-08T14:25:48+00:00 May 8th, 2017|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Psychology|Comments Off on SMU Dedman College alumnus Stephen Poulin ’12 starts apparel company to help veterans

Research on Exercise and Wellness Colloquium Series Features Psychology Assistant Professor, Dr. Austin Baldwin

Talk Abstract: Regular exercise affords many positive effects on health, longevity, and well-being. Despite its many benefits, the majority of adults in the United States do not engage in sufficient levels of regular exercise, and most people who initiate a routine of regular exercise fail to maintain it over time. One intriguing explanation for the widespread lack of regular exercise is that many people experience exercise to be affectively unpleasant, and as a result are less likely to engage in it regularly. In this talk, I will discuss findings across various studies we have conducted that focus on understanding the affective factors that are relevant to exercise and how they might be targeted for intervention. I will also discuss the implications of these findings for [...]

By | 2017-04-27T08:19:35+00:00 April 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Research on Exercise and Wellness Colloquium Series Features Psychology Assistant Professor, Dr. Austin Baldwin

LISTEN: Teens In Low-Income Families Get HPV Vaccine If Parents Persuade Themselves Of Benefits

KERA Originally Posted: April 11, 2017 Guilt, social pressure and even a doctor’s recommendation aren't enough to motivate low-income families to vaccinate their teenagers for Human Papillomavirus (HPV), according to research from Southern Methodist University. But a follow-up study from SMU finds that if parents persuade themselves of the benefits of the vaccinations, more teenagers in low-income families receive protection from the sexually transmitted, cancer-causing virus. LISTEN

By | 2017-04-13T07:56:01+00:00 April 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on LISTEN: Teens In Low-Income Families Get HPV Vaccine If Parents Persuade Themselves Of Benefits
Load More Posts