Self-persuasion iPad app spurs low-income parents to protect teens against cancer-causing hpv

Medical Xpress Originally Posted: March 7, 2017 As health officials struggle to boost the number of teens vaccinated against the deadly human papillomavirus, a new study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, found that self-persuasion works to bring parents on board. Currently public health efforts rely on educational messages and doctor recommendations to persuade parents to vaccinate their adolescents. Self-persuasion as a tool for HPV vaccinations has never been researched until now. The SMU study found that low-income parents will decide to have their teens vaccinated against the sexually transmitted cancer-causing virus if the parents persuade themselves of the protective benefits. The study's subjects—almost all moms—were taking their teens and pre-teens to a safety-net pediatric clinic for medical care. It's the first to look at changing [...]

By | March 8th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Self-persuasion iPad app spurs low-income parents to protect teens against cancer-causing hpv

Corporal punishment viewed as more acceptable and effective when referred to as spanking, study finds

Phys.org Originally Posted: January 4, 2016 Parents and nonparents alike feel better about corporal punishment when it's called 'spanking' rather than 'hitting' or 'beating,' according to a new study by researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Study participants judged identical acts of a child's misbehavior and the corporal punishment that followed it, but rated the discipline as better or worse simply depending on the verb used to describe it. Discipline acts referred to as spank and swat were ranked as more effective and acceptable than those referred to as slap, hit or beat. The findings of the study indicate that people buffer negative views of corporal punishment by calling it by a more culturally acceptable label, said psychologist Alan Brown, psychology professor at SMU and [...]

By | January 4th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Corporal punishment viewed as more acceptable and effective when referred to as spanking, study finds

George Holden, Psychology, Texas anti-paddling activists see little response to education secretary letter

Houston Press Originally Posted: December 13, 2016 It might be easy to imagine that the age of corporal punishment in Texas schools is, at last, at an end. Representative Alma Allen (D-Harris) and Representative Eddie Lucio III (D-Cameron) have both introduced bills this session to ban corporal punishment. Last month, Secretary of Education John B. King sent a letter to officials urging the 19 states that still allow paddling in schools to end it, while more than 80 advocacy groups – including organizations representing women, people of color and disabled people – penned an open letter recommending the same. But advocates for the end of corporal punishment say that while these letters were exciting, they have yet to lead to actual progress in Texas, where nearly [...]

By | December 21st, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on George Holden, Psychology, Texas anti-paddling activists see little response to education secretary letter

Determined to live a life of significance

SMU News Originally Posted: December 13, 2016 After surviving two childhood liver transplants, followed by years of related medical complications, SMU senior Libby Arterburn is determined to live a life of significance. She will graduate from SMU Dec. 17 with degrees in health and society, psychology and a minor in biology, which she intends to apply toward a medical career. Arterburn was diagnosed at age six weeks with antitrypsin deficiency disorder, a rare genetic condition in which the body does not make enough of a protein that protects the liver and lungs from damage. By the time she was four, she required a life-saving liver transplant. Complications led to a second transplant two days later. Since then, Arterburn has endured regular liver biopsies, multiple hospitalizations [...]

By | December 16th, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Psychology|Comments Off on Determined to live a life of significance

Huffington Post covers the latest research of SMU clinical psychologist Alicia Meuret

Huffington Post Originally Posted: October 25, 2016 Not a morning person? There still might be a good reason to get up and at it when it comes to booking time with your therapist. A new study found that patients actually made more progress in overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when they went to psychotherapy in the morning versus the afternoon. In fact, a test of panic symptoms revealed that patients had nearly 30 percent more improvement after an a.m. appointment than an afternoon session. It’s not about whether or not you’re a morning person or a night owl, study author Alicia E. Meuret, a clinical psychologist at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, told The Huffington Post. The new data suggests morning therapy sessions are aided by higher [...]

By | November 2nd, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Huffington Post covers the latest research of SMU clinical psychologist Alicia Meuret

Psychology professor, former student reunite at Mount Everest base camp

SMU News Originally Posted: July 13, 2016 Psychology Professor Susan Hornstein has taught more than 7,000 students over the course of her 14 years at SMU, so she’s used to running into former pupils around town. What she isn’t used to is running into them at base camp on Mount Everest, but that’s exactly what happened May 21 when Hornstein was spotted by former student Aliza Greenberg during a Himalayan trek with two friends “It was cold. I had my hat and my glasses on – I don’t know how she recognized me,” Hornstein says. “My two friends were talking with her father and when I walked up, Aliza turned to me and said ‘Hornstein?’ I was so amazed she recognized me.” Standing in the [...]

By | July 13th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Psychology, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Psychology professor, former student reunite at Mount Everest base camp

George Holden, Psychology, corporal punishment legal but “damaging”

Daily News Originally Posted: April 15, 2016 Horrified viewers watched video of a Georgia principal paddling a 5-year-old boy as punishment — a legal but controversial action that has sparked a conversation about the effects of corporal punishment on children. It is still legal to strike kids as a form of punishment in public schools in 19 states, primarily in the south and the west, despite research and experts’ views that it amounts to child abuse. “I suspect this thing happens a lot. A lot of paddling goes on in small towns in Texas, and particularly in southern states,” George Holden, the chair of the psychology department at Southern Methodist University and the president of the U.S. Alliance to End the Hitting of Children, told [...]

By | April 19th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on George Holden, Psychology, corporal punishment legal but “damaging”

Dedman College students Aubrey Chapman, Carly Shuttlesworth, and Hannah Dudley discuss early graduation

SMU Daily Campus Originally Posted: March 28, 2016 Aubrey Chapman, a junior double majoring in psychology and religious studies, is looking forward to graduating in May of 2016, a year earlier than her peers. After graduation, Chapman will immediately move on in her studies and get her master’s degree in marriage and family therapy at seminary. Even though Chapman has heard many say that college is the best four years of your life, she has no qualms about missing out on her senior year. She said she has enjoyed her time at SMU. “Personally, graduating early is allowing me to step into seminary sooner to receive the education that is in complete alignment with what I want to do in the future,” said Chapman. “I’m [...]

By | April 4th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Sociology (Student), Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Dedman College students Aubrey Chapman, Carly Shuttlesworth, and Hannah Dudley discuss early graduation

Congratulations to Psychology graduate students Margaret Sala and Rose Ashraf

Margaret Sala has been awarded an NSF Graduate Fellowship. This is a three year award and very competitive. Rose Ashraf won the award for best graduate student paper at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Human Development held in Denver on March 17-19.  

By | March 29th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, Psychology|Comments Off on Congratulations to Psychology graduate students Margaret Sala and Rose Ashraf

Dedman College 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact

SMU Research Originally Posted: January 8, 2016 It was a good year for faculty and student research efforts. Here is a small sampling of public and published acknowledgements during 2015: Research makes the cover of Biochemistry Drugs important in the battle against cancer were tested in a virtual lab by SMU biology professors to see how they would behave in the human cell. A computer-generated composite image of the simulation made the Dec. 15 cover of the journal Biochemistry. Scientific articles about discoveries from the simulation were also published in the peer review journals Biochemistry and in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. The researchers tested the drugs by simulating their interaction in a computer-generated model of one of the cell’s key molecular pumps — the protein [...]

By | January 11th, 2016|Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Economics, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man, Physics, Psychology|Comments Off on Dedman College 2015 research efforts broadly noted in a variety of ways for world-changing impact
Load More Posts