Jeffrey Engel, Center for Presidential History, Is Sounding Presidential Important?

Presidential Historian Jeffrey Engel looks at the outcomes of Tuesday’s (April 26) primaries and notes the differences in the tones of victory speeches by Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump.

YouTube Preview Image

International Symposium on Violence in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands a Success

April 27, 2016

CgMCPkLUAAAq_KI
Panel: Alfredo Corchado, DMN; Alan Knight, Oxford; Joaquin Rivaya-Martinez, Texas State University; Gerardo Gurza, Instituto Mora; Brandon Morgan, New Mexico Community College

Dallas, TX – SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies, in partnership with the Instituto Mora of Mexico City, hosted a public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border on Saturday, April 16, at the Latino Cultural Center in Dallas.

Bringing together scholars and journalists from Mexico, the United States and Great Britain, the international forum focused on the long evolution of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border, from the role of the state in borderland violence, drugs and smuggling, to refugees, migrants and mob violence. Over 200 people attended the afternoon conference featuring panel discussions centered on the evolution of violence along the border from the 1800s to the modern drug wars.

sherry violence
Sherry Smith welcomes and introduces symposium

“Because of the modern drug wars, the border today has an enduring reputation as a site of brutal violence,” noted Andrew J. Torget, a professor of history at the University of North Texas and one of the organizers of the event. “But what people tend to forget is that border violence has changed dramatically during the past two centuries, and there is nothing inevitable about today’s situation. This public event will present historical background for the modern situation, as we discuss how border violence has evolved over time.”

group violence
Group photo of presenters on the steps of Dallas Hall

Sponsored by the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at SMU in partnership with Instituto Mora of Mexico City, and with support from SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program and the Latino Cultural Center, a division of the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs.

LEARN MORE: The official program brochure with presenter names and affiliations. HERE

Watch the public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Part 1: 
YouTube Preview Image
Part 2: 
YouTube Preview Image
Part 3:
YouTube Preview Image

The Center for Presidential History has become a hub for current, in depth and innovative research.

SMU NEWS

Originally Posted: April 19, 2016

DALLAS (SMU) – When SMU’s Center for Presidential History (CPH) arrived on campus in 2012, Founding Director Jeffrey Engel had great expectations for bringing to life – and to Dallas – the detailed history of America’s chief executives.

In less than four years, CPH has become a hub for current, in depth and innovative research in presidential history. Through postdoctoral fellowships, on-campus writing fellowships, community engagement, a unique Collective Memory Project and publishing volumes based on its own work, the center provides a unique understanding of both history and public affairs. READ MORE

SMU recognizes outstanding achievement at 2015-16 Hilltop Excellence Awards, Honors Convocation

Congratulations to the Dedman College faculty and students who were recognized at the 2016 Awards Extravaganza on Monday, April 18.

Recipients of the Outstanding Professor Awards presented by the Rotunda yearbook include:

B. Sunday Eiselt, associate professor and director of undergraduate studies, Department of Anthropology
Laurence Winnie, senior lecturer and director of undergraduate studies, William P. Clements Department of History

Receiving the Extra Mile Awards, presented by Students for New Learning for graciousness and sensitivity to students with learning differences:

Sheri Kunovich, associate professor, Department of Sociology
• Laurie Nuchereno, adjunct lecturer, Department of Economics

For the full list of faculty, staff and student award recipients click here.

 

 

Neil Foley, History, How Mexican immigration helped make America great

The Australian Broadcasting Network

Originally Posted: March 28, 2016

The following is from the March 29, 2016, edition of The Australian Broadcasting Network. SMU History Professor Neil Foley provided expertise for this story.

Donald Trump has some seemingly simple strategies to stop many Mexicans migrating to the US, but the relationship between the two North American neighbours is a complex one. As Annabelle Quince explains, much of south-west America was once part of Mexico, and without Mexican labour the US agricultural industry would be in trouble.

It’s obvious from the names of some of America’s biggest cities that they have a Spanish-speaking heritage. Settlements like Santa Fe, San Antonio, Los Angeles, and San Diego fall within the swathes of south-west America that were colonised by Spain and were then, for centuries, part of Mexico. READ MORE

 

John Chavez and Neil Foley invited to participate in ‘Envisioning American Studies’

 

SMU Department of History professors John Chavez and Neil Foley were invited to participate in ‘Envisioning American Studies, A Conference in Honor of American Culture’s 80th Year at Michigan.’ Recipients of Ph.D.’s from that interdisciplinary program, both professors were feted as significant alumni and asked to impart their wisdom to current students, fellow alumni, former mentors, old friends, as well as other conferees from many other campuses around the country.

Edward Countryman, Department of History, gives keynote address and is elected a fellow of MHS

Professor Edward Countryman, Department of History
University Distinguished Professor

a) Gave one of the plenary keynote addresses to the annual meeting of the Consortium on the Age of Revolutions 1750-1850, which met this year at Louisiana State University, Shreveport, February 25-27, 2016 The topic of his address was “The First American Civil War.”

b) He was elected a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, joining “a core group of elected supporters made up of distinguished scholars and civic leaders who have the privilege of shaping the Society.”

Two Dedman College professors discuss the Supreme Court nominee and the politics of a nomination in an election year

Fox 4

Originally Posted: March 16, 2016

Reaction to SCOTUS nominee Garland

Two SMU professors discuss the nominee and the politics of a nomination in an election year. WATCH

William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies hosts International Symposium on Violence in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands

800px-Nogales_Arizona_1910-1920SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, in partnership with the Instituto Mora of Mexico City, will host a public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border, at 2:30 pm on Latino Cultural Center in Dallas on April 16, 2016. READ MORE