Watch: Dr. Jo Guldi, Assistant Professor of British History and Digital History gives keynote speech at the 2017 Honors Convocation.

https://youtu.be/ZoqHfkz-ysE At the 2017 Honors Convocation at SMU Dr. Jo Guldi, Assistant Professor of British HIstory and Digital HIstory at Dedman School of Humanities and Sciences, gave the keynote speech in McFarlin Auditorium on the SMU campus with an introduction by SMU President, Dr. R. Gerald Turner. https://youtu.be/ZoqHfkz-ysE

By | 2017-04-24T10:22:27+00:00 April 24th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Watch: Dr. Jo Guldi, Assistant Professor of British History and Digital History gives keynote speech at the 2017 Honors Convocation.

SMU honors outstanding achievement, service at 2016-17 Hilltop Excellence Awards, Honors Convocation

SMU News Originally Posted: April 18, 2017 SMU faculty, staff, administrators and students were recognized with teaching awards, service honors and the University’s highest commendation, the “M” Award, at the 2016-17 Hilltop Excellence Awards Monday, April 17. Earlier in the day, the University honored its best students at the 20th Honors Convocation. The address was delivered by Jo Guldi, assistant professor of history in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. > Find a complete list of award winners from Honors Convocation 2017 A native Dallasite, Guldi studies the history of Great Britain and the British Empire, landscape history, legal history, property law, infrastructure, digital methods, international development, and agrarian studies. As a digital and data historian, she also oversees the lecture series “Data is Made Up of Stories: University-wide Futures From the Digital Humanities,” [...]

By | 2017-04-18T08:42:44+00:00 April 18th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on SMU honors outstanding achievement, service at 2016-17 Hilltop Excellence Awards, Honors Convocation

Congratulations Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi recently awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship

Tower Center Blog Originally Posted: April 5, 2017 Three SMU professors Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi were awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship for 2017-2018. The award, designed to increase research and scholarship and to enhance teaching effectiveness, gives SMU faculty members up to $5,000 for their research, which contributes to what President Bush referred to as the New World Order. Sabri Ates, associate professor of history, will use the award to finish writing his book Seyyid Abdulqadir Nehri’s Pursuit of an Independent Kurdistan. With the recent developments in Iraq, Syria and Turkey the question of Kurdish statelessness is becoming more pressing. Ates explores what historical conditions account for how the Kurds became the largest ethnic group without its own nation. His book [...]

By | 2017-04-11T10:02:57+00:00 April 11th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, Political Science|Comments Off on Congratulations Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi recently awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship

Write, Edit, Repeat!

SMU Adventures Originally Posted: March 20, 2017 Associate Professor of Political Science Joe Kobylka and the students in his Honors Program class “The Supreme Court Seminar” are spending six days in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., doing research in the papers of former Supreme Court Justices. Each student has developed a unique research topic, question, and design, and will use the justices’ papers to find evidence to help answer the question and write a culminating original research paper. An update from Greg G., a sophomore majoring in statistical sciences, and minoring in computer science and history: For all of us on the trip, our ability to easily sift out information that’s unlikely to help us and picking out useful quotes, memos, and snippets [...]

KERA Think: SMU History Professor Talks About The Russian Revolution

KERA Think Originally Posted: February 22, 2017 One hundred years ago this month, the Russian Empire collapsed with the abdication of Emperor Nicholas II. Daniel Orlovsky, George Bouhe Research Fellow in Russian Studies at SMU, and Boris Kolonitsky, Russian Revolution History Chair at the European University in St Petersburg, Russia, join us to talk about how the Russian Revolution brought about the Soviet Union and eventually the Russia of today. They’ll speak at “The Russian Revolution of 1917: A Centennial View,” a symposium at SMU. READ MORE

By | 2017-02-23T09:46:30+00:00 February 22nd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on KERA Think: SMU History Professor Talks About The Russian Revolution

Listen: Senior Clements Center fellow Eric Meeks on KERA’s Think Wednesday, February 15 at noon

Senior Clements Center for Southwest Studies fellow Eric Meeks will be on KERA’s Think Wednesday, February 15 from noon-1 p.m. Meeks will discuss his work on the history of the US-Mexico borderlands in anticipation of his evening lecture at SMU on February 21st. For more information about Eric Meeks visit: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Academics/InstitutesCenters/swcenter/Events/Lectures/Meeks

By | 2017-02-15T10:23:52+00:00 February 15th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, History|Comments Off on Listen: Senior Clements Center fellow Eric Meeks on KERA’s Think Wednesday, February 15 at noon

Event: Stanton Sharp Symposium February 22-23

SMU News Originally Posted: February 9, 2017 The Russian Revolution of February and October 1917 is a defining watershed of the twentieth century and the centennial is commemorated and explored here in this two-day symposium. The Russian Revolution, like the French earlier, signaled transformations of the social, political, economic, and cultural orders within and along the borders of the Russian Empire. And it would have tremendous influence beyond, including in Europe, Asia, and Latin America; indeed, its impact was truly global. The Russian Revolution created the world’s first socialist state, the USSR, which attempted to negate or overcome the world of capitalism and markets, to build new types of government, society, family, and gender relationships according to the ideologies of Marx, Engels, and Lenin. In [...]

By | 2017-02-10T10:37:29+00:00 February 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, History|Comments Off on Event: Stanton Sharp Symposium February 22-23

Dedman College alumnus, Conner Kline, writes commentary in Star Tribune

Star Tribune Originally Posted: February 8, 2017 Conner Kline, is a recent graduate from Southern Methodist University with majors in history and political science. Betsy DeVos' sin in Democrats' eyes? Supporting school choice as a way to help kids The new ed secretary's positions didn't sit well with Democrats, or teachers unions, despite the demonstrated promise of such reforms.  With the confirmation of Betsy DeVos as U.S. Secretary of Education, it appears that education armageddon has arrived. At least, that’s how Democrats and teachers unions are portraying it. At the end of their 24-hour talkathon, during which Senate Democrats decried the DeVos nomination as “an insult to schoolchildren and their families, to teachers and principals and communities fighting to improve their public schools all across [...]

By | 2017-02-09T10:13:50+00:00 February 9th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, Political Science|Comments Off on Dedman College alumnus, Conner Kline, writes commentary in Star Tribune

Watches were once considered a ‘silly a– fad’ — here’s what that could say about their future

Business Insider Originally posted: February 7, 2017 Wristwatches have been commonplace for nearly everyone alive today. It was hard to imagine a world where most people — both men and women — didn't have a watch mounted on their wrist. A future where we learn the time from glancing at our phones and not our wrists was inconceivable. But that certainly seems to be the future we're heading towards. And, historically, it's not an inconceivable one. Watches, when they were first being worn on the wrist in the early 1900s, were not considered to be a serious trend, and were instead worn by jokesters and Vaudeville artists. A 1916 New York Times article even referred to wristwatches as a "silly a-- fad." At the time, both gentlemen [...]

By | 2017-02-09T09:31:17+00:00 February 9th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Watches were once considered a ‘silly a– fad’ — here’s what that could say about their future
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