Research: SMU-led fossil study finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

SMU Forum Originally Posted: December 7, 2017 Fossil leaves from Africa have resolved a prehistoric climate puzzle — and also confirm the link between carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global warming. Research until now has produced a variety of results and conflicting data that have cast doubt on the link between high carbon dioxide levels and climate change for a time interval about 22 million years ago. But a new study has found the link does indeed exist for that prehistoric time period, say SMU researchers. The finding will help scientists understand how recent and future increases in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide may impact the future of our planet, they add. The discovery comes from new biochemical analyses of fossil leaves from [...]

By | 2017-12-08T06:16:54+00:00 December 8th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Research: SMU-led fossil study finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

Digitally Mapping and Exhibiting the Plains’ Chicana/o Movement

SMU's History Grad Student Blogs Joel Zapata is a PhD Candidate in SMU’s William P. Clements Department of History The Chicana/o Civil Rights Movement, or simply the Chicana/o Movement, has traditionally been documented as a regional liberation movement centered in South Texas, Northern New Mexico, the Denver metro area, and Southern California. Moreover, scholars have tended to focus their work on the Chicana/o Movement within major cities like Los Angeles and San Antonio. [1]  This is partly because the Chicana/o Movement was a decentralized patchwork of local movements, and partly because the history profession relies on archives and other source materials that institutions outside of progressive, urban areas do not often preserve. As Michel-Rolph Trouillot declared, “the production of historical narratives involves the uneven contribution of [...]

By | 2017-08-31T09:46:22+00:00 August 31st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, History|Comments Off on Digitally Mapping and Exhibiting the Plains’ Chicana/o Movement

On Being an Anthropologist in the Era of Big Data

SMU Adventures Originally Posted: August 3, 2017 Megan B. is a graduate student studying anthropology. She was awarded a Maguire and Irby Family Foundation Public Service Fellowship for summer 2017 from SMU’s Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility. She is spending the summer studying environmental advocacy with the Trinity River Audubon Society. READ MORE  

By | 2017-08-06T19:20:02+00:00 August 6th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on On Being an Anthropologist in the Era of Big Data

We Can’t Resurrect T. Rex and We Don’t Want To

Inverse Originally Posted: August 22, 2016 Molecular biology Ph.D. candidate Lauren Ammerman has looked into and Jurassic megafauna would be a megaproblem. The Jurassic Park franchise, like the dinosaurs it reanimates, won’t be ignored. Michael Crichton’s masterpiece makes a lot of cameos in academic papers. Still, it’s rarely the focus of true inquiry. It is, after all, kind of easy to dismiss. But Lauren Ammerman, a molecular biology Ph.D. candidate at Southern Methodist University, doesn’t want to be dismissive. This is why, as a senior at Baylor University, she authored an honors thesis about what happens when Jurassic gene editing meets the rewilding movement meets the ultimate alpha predator. She made herself — and this is truly awesome — an expert on what would happen if we brought back [...]

By | 2016-08-28T18:05:53+00:00 August 28th, 2016|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on We Can’t Resurrect T. Rex and We Don’t Want To

Meet the Scientist: Eveline Kuchmak, an SMU alumna and current Manager of Temporary Exhibitions at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science

The Rock Report Originally Posted: July 18, 2016 Meet: Eveline Kuchmak Another Southern Methodist University alumna (Pony Up!), Eveline graduated with her bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and Economic Sociology. Growing up she “lived for trips to art and science museums, space camp, Pony Club veterinary workshops, and the latest issue of National Geographic.” She was homeschooled for much of her childhood and her parents always made sure she had a healthy dose of curiosity. After graduation, she attended archaeological field school in New Mexico which only reinforced her desire to discover new things and share these experiences. This path has led her to a career inspiring others through science museums. She began working at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in education and public programs; [...]

By | 2016-07-21T07:52:47+00:00 July 21st, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Graduate News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man, Sociology, Sociology (Alumni)|Comments Off on Meet the Scientist: Eveline Kuchmak, an SMU alumna and current Manager of Temporary Exhibitions at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science

Meet the Scientist, Paleontology

Originally Posted: June 29, 2016 SMU alumna, Katharina Marino, who used to prepare fossils in the Shuler labs and then worked as an educator at the Perot Museum, is now pursuing a Master's degree in science communication at the University of Otago in New Zealand.  She has started a blog in which she interviews scientists.  Her first interviewee is another SMU alum, Yuri Kimura, who received her Ph.D. at the same time Katharina received her Bachelor's degree.  Please click the link below to read this very nice interview from two of our finest. https://therockrecord.wordpress.com/2016/05/30/meet-dr-yuri-kimura/

2016-2017 Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellows Named

DFW Schweitzer Fellows will launch health and wellbeing initiatives within underserved communities while completing leadership training Dallas, TX, June 23, 2016—The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (ASF) announced the selection of its second class of Dallas-Fort Worth Albert Schweitzer Fellows—9 graduate students who will spend the next year learning to effectively address the social factors that impact health, and developing lifelong leadership skills. In doing so, they will follow the example set by famed physician-humanitarian Albert Schweitzer, for whom their Fellowship is named. Schweitzer Fellows develop and implement service projects that address the root causes of health disparities in under-resourced communities, while also fulfilling their academic responsibilities. Each project is implemented in collaboration with a community-based health and/or social service organization. This year’s Fellows will address an [...]

By | 2016-06-22T20:46:32+00:00 June 22nd, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Faculty News, Graduate News, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on 2016-2017 Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellows Named

Congratulations to Psychology graduate students Margaret Sala and Rose Ashraf

Margaret Sala has been awarded an NSF Graduate Fellowship. This is a three year award and very competitive. Rose Ashraf won the award for best graduate student paper at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Human Development held in Denver on March 17-19.  

By | 2016-03-29T09:53:06+00:00 March 29th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, Psychology|Comments Off on Congratulations to Psychology graduate students Margaret Sala and Rose Ashraf

Grad student discovers river in Peru so hot it boils animals alive

Tech Insider Originally Posted: February 22, 2016 Deep in the heart of the Peruvian Amazon, an anomalous and perplexing natural wonder lies: A raging river that boils. Once just the stuff of folklore, geophysicist Andrés Ruzo, a PhD student at Southern Methodist University, set out to find the legendary waterway himself. He not only found it, but he confirmed that it does, in fact, surge at a scalding 200 degrees Fahrenheit. "It feels like I'm in a sauna inside a toaster oven," Ruzo said sitting on the bank of the river in his new book, The Boiling River: Adventure and Discovery in the Amazon. (Ruzo also discussed his quest to understand its puzzling features in a recent TED talk.) READ MORE

By | 2016-02-23T10:27:07+00:00 February 23rd, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Graduate News|Comments Off on Grad student discovers river in Peru so hot it boils animals alive
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