Various opinions from SMU professors

SMU News Originally Posted: December 7, 2017 Following are links to a sample of opinions written by SMU professors that have appeared recently in various publications. They represent the independent thoughts of their authors and appear in the order in which they were published, the most recent being at the top. READ MORE Trump should try quiet diplomacy By Jeffrey Engel Director of the SMU Center for Presidential History at SMU Twenty-five years ago this week, Americans rejected a far different man than the one in power today. Self-confident where Donald Trump is thin-skinned, well-mannered in a way Trump considers weak, George H.W. Bush is remembered a quarter-century out of office as an elder statesman whose call for a “kinder and gentler” nation appears quaint [...]

By | 2017-12-08T06:22:30+00:00 December 11th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Various opinions from SMU professors

Cullum Clark, Economics, charities hold breath as lawmakers work on tax reform

Fox 4 Originally Posted: December 7, 2017 Charities are holding their breath as lawmakers hammer out details of a massive overhaul to the taxcode Some organizations are fearful the changes could equal a drop in charitable giving. “The last couple of weeks of the year our donations go way up,” said Jonathan Rich, Salvation Army. “In fact the last quarter of each calendar year we see more donations, about 50 percent of our donations come in the last quarter alone.” The most visible fundraiser is the Salvation Army’s Red Kettle Campaign, but they are also reliant on major gifts. “When someone like you or me decides to give a thousand dollars to a charity, that’s a major gift and we get to write it off [...]

By | 2017-12-12T08:23:27+00:00 December 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Cullum Clark, Economics, charities hold breath as lawmakers work on tax reform

George Holden, Psychology, spanking children can lead to relationship violence later, according to a recent study

Fox 4 Originally Posted: December 5, 2017 Parents who believe in “spare the rod, spoil the child” might be setting their children up to become violent toward future partners, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of Pediatrics. “We asked 758 kids between 19 and 20 years old how often they had been spanked, slapped or struck with an object as form of punishment when they were younger,” said the study’s lead author, Jeff Temple, an associate professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “Kids who said they had experienced corporal punishment were more likely to have recently committed dating violence.” This result, he said, held up even when contributing factors such as sex, age, parental education, ethnicity and childhood abuse were [...]

By | 2017-12-12T08:19:59+00:00 December 6th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on George Holden, Psychology, spanking children can lead to relationship violence later, according to a recent study

Where Dallas’ Oldest History Goes to Die

D Magazine Originally Posted: December 2017 issue Dr. Sunday Eiselt—a field archaeologist, SMU professor, and former Marine—has a friendly disposition and long hair that falls to her waist. I went to meet her last summer on campus because she’d discovered something that I’d spent weeks searching for, something that had been missing for decades. Inside Heroy Science Hall, I waited for her in the lobby and passed time by looking at various geologic displays and worn, oversize photographs of digs in Egypt. When she arrived, we made introductions and headed downstairs to the basement floor. As we began the descent, she turned and said, “We won’t be looking at any human remains today. I can show you artifacts, but no humans.” She said this cordially [...]

By | 2017-12-05T10:49:55+00:00 December 5th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Where Dallas’ Oldest History Goes to Die

History Professor Op-Ed in New York Times: George McGovern, Vietnam and the Democratic Crackup

New York Times Originally Posted: December: 5, 2017 On Sept. 24, 1963, George McGovern, the junior senator from South Dakota, addressed a full chamber on America’s growing entanglement in Southeast Asia. His words rang like a fire bell in the night. “The current dilemma in Vietnam is a clear demonstration of the limitations of military power,” the 41-year-old Democrat declared, just before the vote on a record-breaking defense appropriation. “There in the jungles of Asia, our mighty nuclear arsenal, our $50 billion arms budget, and our costly ‘special forces’ have proved powerless to cope with a ragged band of illiterate guerrillas fighting with homemade weapons.” Even worse, in Saigon, American resources were being used “to suppress the very liberties we went in to defend,” he [...]

By | 2017-12-05T08:25:36+00:00 December 5th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on History Professor Op-Ed in New York Times: George McGovern, Vietnam and the Democratic Crackup

SMU history professor/time expert Alexis McCrossen explores the evolution of New Year’s celebrations

SMU News Originally Posted: November 30, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) – Before fireworks displays, the Tournament of Roses Parade and champagne toasts, New Year’s Day in the United States was a time to pay respect, reflect and render accounts. The revelry came later, says Alexis McCrossen, SMU professor of history. Ironically, the holiday’s deeper meaning and purpose would get lost in the annual bacchanalia. Thousands of Americans in 1927 lined up outside the White House to attend a reception hosted by President Calvin Coolidge. The tradition began with George Washington's presidency and continued through the presidency of Herbert Hoover. Photo courtesy the U.S. Library of Congress. “There’s something deeply symbolic about the new year,” McCrossen says. “Historically it’s been when individuals and communities made sense of [...]

By | 2017-12-04T10:54:54+00:00 December 4th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on SMU history professor/time expert Alexis McCrossen explores the evolution of New Year’s celebrations

Various opinions from SMU professors

SMU News Originally Posted: November 29, 2017 Following are links to a sample of opinions written by SMU professors that have appeared recently in various publications. They represent the independent thoughts of their authors and appear in the order in which they were published, the most recent being at the top. Trump should try quiet diplomacy By Jeffrey Engel Director of the SMU Center for Presidential History at SMUTwenty-five years ago this week, Americans rejected a far different man than the one in power today. Self-confident where Donald Trump is thin-skinned, well-mannered in a way Trump considers weak, George H.W. Bush is remembered a quarter-century out of office as an elder statesman whose call for a “kinder and gentler” nation appears quaint in retrospect.  Read [...]

By | 2017-11-30T11:27:02+00:00 December 1st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Philosophy, Political Science, Tower Center|Comments Off on Various opinions from SMU professors

Do Those Blue Light Filters on Devices Really Help You Sleep?

KQED Science Originally Posted: November 27, 2017 If you’re losing sleep over the blue light coming from your phone, there’s an app for that. In fact, there are now lots of apps that promise to improve sleep by filtering out the blue light produced by phones, tablets, computers and even televisions. But how well do these apps work? There haven’t been any big studies to answer that question. So I phoned a couple of scientists who study the link between blue light exposure and sleep. My first call is to Lisa Ostrin, an assistant professor at the University of Houston College of Optometry. Ostrin owns an iPhone. And every iPhone comes with an app called Night Shift that lets you filter out blue light. So [...]

By | 2017-11-29T07:24:54+00:00 November 29th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Do Those Blue Light Filters on Devices Really Help You Sleep?

Oil and gas industry is causing Texas earthquakes, a ‘landmark’ study suggests

Washington Post Originally Posted: November 24, 2017 An unnatural number of earthquakes hit Texas in the past decade, and the region's seismic activity is increasing. In 2008, two earthquakes stronger than magnitude 3 struck the state. Eight years later, 12 did. Natural forces trigger most earthquakes. But humans are causing earthquakes, too, with mining and dam construction the most frequent suspects. There has been a recent increase in natural gas extraction — including fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, but other techniques as well — which produces a lot of wastewater. To get rid of it, the water is injected deep into the ground. When wastewater works its way into dormant faults, the thinking goes, the water's pressure nudges the ancient cracks. Pent-up tectonic stress releases and the ground shakes. But for any [...]

By | 2017-11-29T07:27:21+00:00 November 25th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Oil and gas industry is causing Texas earthquakes, a ‘landmark’ study suggests

SMU Geology Professor Neil Tabor to go to Antarctica

Omaha World Journal Originally Posted: November 15, 2017 Former Omahan Neil Tabor has embarked upon a journey to the geographic end of the world to study a past end of the world (of sorts) in hopes of preventing a future end of the world. The Central High and University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduate — now a Dallas-based geologist and professor at Southern Methodist University — is bound for Antarctica on a project funded by the National Science Foundation. He’ll be stationed for about 2½ months in a tent camp on the frozen continent’s east side studying rocks so old they predate the dinosaurs and even the existence of the planet’s formation of the seven continents as we know them. His job in Antarctica won’t be measuring [...]

By | 2017-11-22T08:34:19+00:00 November 22nd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU Geology Professor Neil Tabor to go to Antarctica
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