Andrew Graybill, William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, photographer Laura Wilson’s work showcases American West

Guide Live

Originally Posted: August 28, 2015

Laura Wilson’s rare photographs showcase the American West

Hollywood actor Owen Wilson has in his home “a great picture that my mom took of Donald Judd. He’s a great artist, and it’s in Marfa. It may have been one of the last photographs of him that was taken before he passed away.”
Owen pauses and says, “I think of her as my mom, and my mom is an artist.” The picture of Judd “is an artist taking a picture of an artist. Maybe that’s why she’s able to get such good photographs. She has the eye of an artist.” READ MORE

John Goodwin Tower Distinguished Chair, Josh Rovner, Is Someone Politicizing Intelligence on ISIS?

Political Violence at a Glance

This week the New York Times reported on complaints that the military is altering intelligence estimates in the war against ISIS. According to the Times, civilian analysts in the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) claim that officials in U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) have been “improperly reworking” their conclusions in order to present a picture of optimism and progress. While the report is does not contain much detail, critics have already concluded that it is a clear case of politicization. Administration supporters are whitewashing intelligence, they say, rather than face the fact that the administration’s strategy is failing.

Politicization has serious consequences. It skews current intelligence reports and inhibits later reassessment. Episodes of politicization also poison relations between policymakers and intelligence agencies for years after the fact, as happened after a major intelligence-policy breakdown during the Vietnam War. So the claim about doctoring intelligence on ISIS is a serious allegation. Is it true? READ MORE

Student draws inspiration from role in organizing national black fiction writer’s literary retreat

SMU News

River-at-kimbilio-retreat-3

DALLAS (SMU) — When SMU creative writing director David Haynes started planning this summer’s Kimbilio Literary Retreat, a weeklong excursion to SMU-in-Taos for African American fiction writers, he knew he’d need a helping hand.

Where to look? He quickly made up his mind to recruit help from his spring intermediate fiction writing class.

“Haynes offered me a work-study position because he needed help with the Kimbilio website and their social media platforms,” says 20-year-old interdisciplinary studies junior River Ribas. “I said, ‘I’m young. I can help you with that.’”

Ribas didn’t realize it then, but the job description would include a lot more than social media duty by the summer’s end. READ MORE

Linda K. Wertheimer, author of the new book Faith Ed.: Teaching About Religion in an Age of Intolerance, praised Religious Studies Prof. Mark Chancey

KERA, Think

Originally Posted: August 20, 2015

Teaching Without Preaching

Public schools aren’t allowed to encourage students to pursue religion. Yet so much of navigating a diverse world requires an understanding of other people’s beliefs. This hour, we’ll talk about how to prepare students without proselytizing with Linda K. Wertheimer, author of Faith Ed.: Teaching About Religion in an Age of Intolerance (Beacon Press). LISTEN

Matthew Wilson, Political Science, Dallas D.A. Susan Hawks three-week absence creating buzz at courthouse

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: August 22, 2015

Where is Susan Hawk?

Dallas County’s district attorney has been on an abrupt break from work for nearly three weeks — and those close to her won’t say where she is.

Hawk has been off since Aug. 3, a representative said. She has canceled or skipped multiple public appearances during that time, including a high-profile Crimes Against Children Conference, where she was invited to speak. Her absence from the office has become the talk of the Frank Crowley Courts Building, with even her own employees speculating on their boss’s unexplained whereabouts. READ MORE

George Holden, Psychology, how does it affect parents to spank their own children?

GeekDad

Originally Posted: August 24, 2015

My Kids Don’t Remember Being Spanked, But I Can’t Forget

I grew up in a house that spanked. Such punishment was usually reserved for the strongest of offenses–deliberate disregard for household property, or, more often, when my brother or I used force on each other. I don’t distinctly recall who dished out the punishment, but I do remember that, while my father occasionally threatened “the belt” (though it was never delivered), it was my mother who transformed the wooden spoons into instruments of terror. One favorite family story is how she went to change my bedding one day and found all of the wooden spoons lined up neatly under my mattress; we never figured out what I had done wrong, but I had clearly been worried about being punished for something. READ MORE

Cal Jillson, Political Science, on Hillary Clinton e-mails

Christian Science Monitor

Originally Posted: August 14, 2015

Was former Secretary of State Clinton sending or receiving classified information via unsecured e-mails? (So far, the only classified information found in a handful of Clinton e-mails may have been labeled as such after the fact. And it was information received, not sent.)

Why did she hand her private e-mail server and a thumb drive over to the FBI this week after months of resisting? (Likely because the pressure to do so was never going to end.) READ MORE

Remembering A Texan’s Role In Ending World War II

KERA News

Originally Posted: August 17, 2015

This month marks the 70th anniversary of the bombing of Japan. Two atomic bombs named ‘Little Boy’ and ‘Fat Man’ were dropped on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 in an effort to end World War II. A Texan, Major James Hopkins, piloted one of the planes on the Nagasaki mission.

His son, SMU Professor Emeritus Jim Hopkins, joined KERA’s Justin Martin to talk about his father. LISTEN HERE

Steve Hilts, Philosophy, The Ethical Consumer

KERA, Think

Originally Posted: August 20, 2015

Many of our everyday purchases are made without giving much thought to the businesses we’re supporting. Yet the more we know about how a company operates – and even the political leanings of its C.E.O. – the more those purchases also become ethical decisions. This hour, we’ll talk about how what we know about businesses affects how we spend our money with a panel of business ethics professors. Be sure to check out this recent New York Times story about the dynamics of Amazon, the inspiration for today’s conversation. LISTEN