‘Failing Families, Failing Science’

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: December 2, 2016 New book about balancing work and home life as an academic scientist warns that failure to address the challenge will cost institutions and science as a whole. By Colleen Flaherty Much of the literature on balancing faculty and home life centers on women. There’s talk of the “baby penalty” for women who choose to have children, for example. A new book, based on five years of research involving academic scientists, sheds more light on the struggles of both men and women as they try to grow their careers and their families. Failing Families, Failing Science: Work-Family Conflict in Academic Science (New York University Press) is based on the idea that work-life balance is not an issue exclusive to women -- and must be [...]

By | December 2nd, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on ‘Failing Families, Failing Science’

Seismic denial?

Dallas News Originally Posted: November 17, 2016 A white Chevy Suburban with "Railroad Commission of Texas" emblazoned on its side rolled north on Interstate 35. Behind the wheel sat Milton Rister, the commission's director. Trim and balding, Rister was a veteran political operator who had held influential positions within the Texas Republican Party for decades. He could smell political disaster from miles away - and this one reeked. As he neared the town of Azle, northwest of Dallas, Rister said to himself: Please let there be only 50 people there. For weeks, telephones at commission headquarters in Austin had been ringing about earthquakes hitting Azle, which had never felt a quake before. Suddenly, ground was shaking under hayfields and homes, rattling windows, knocking pictures off shelves, [...]

By | November 21st, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Seismic denial?

NCI grant funds SMU research into cancer-causing viruses that hide from the immune system

SMU Research Originally Posted: November 8, 2016 Genes common to both the human T-cell leukemia virus and high-risk human papillomaviruses activate survival mechanisms in cancer cells. An SMU lab, with National Cancer Institute funding, is hunting ways to inhibit those genes to halt the development of cancer. SMU virologist and cancer researcher Robert L. Harrod has been awarded a $436,500 grant from the National Cancer Institute to further his lab’s research into how certain viruses cause cancers in humans. Under two previous NCI grants, Harrod’s lab discovered that the human T-cell leukemia virus type-1, HTLV-1, and high-risk subtype human papillomaviruses, HPVs, share a common mechanism that plays a key role in allowing cancers to develop. Now the lab will search for the biological mechanism — a molecular target — [...]

By | November 8th, 2016|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on NCI grant funds SMU research into cancer-causing viruses that hide from the immune system

Tough Turtle: Dino-Killing Asteroid Spared Sea Creature

Live Science Originally Posted: November 8, 2016 Shortly after an asteroid smashed into Earth about 65.5 million years ago, obliterating much of life on Earth,an ancient sea turtle with a triangular-shaped head swam along the relatively arid shores of southern Africa, a new study finds. The creature, a newly identified species, lived about 64 million years ago during the Paleocene, an epoch within the Paleogene period, the researchers said. The animal is closely related to earlier seaturtles that lived before the asteroid struck, an event known as the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary, which marks the mass extinction that killed about 75 percent of all species on Earth, including the nonavian dinosaurs. "If these sea turtles do, in fact, form a tightly knit group, evolutionarily speaking, then the [African] specimen provides proof [...]

By | November 8th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Tough Turtle: Dino-Killing Asteroid Spared Sea Creature

Huffington Post covers the latest research of SMU clinical psychologist Alicia Meuret

Huffington Post Originally Posted: October 25, 2016 Not a morning person? There still might be a good reason to get up and at it when it comes to booking time with your therapist. A new study found that patients actually made more progress in overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when they went to psychotherapy in the morning versus the afternoon. In fact, a test of panic symptoms revealed that patients had nearly 30 percent more improvement after an a.m. appointment than an afternoon session. It’s not about whether or not you’re a morning person or a night owl, study author Alicia E. Meuret, a clinical psychologist at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, told The Huffington Post. The new data suggests morning therapy sessions are aided by higher [...]

By | November 2nd, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Huffington Post covers the latest research of SMU clinical psychologist Alicia Meuret

Analysts Doubt Texas Is A Toss-Up State

CBS News Originally Posted: October 24, 2016 Despite Donald Trump’s tightening poll numbers in Texas, Republicans like Cathie Adams, say their confidence isn’t shaken. “I think he’s going to win Texas hands-down. I don’t trust the polls, but I do trust Texans, and I love Texans and I think Texans can think for themselves and we don’t have to look at a poll to know how to vote,” said Adams. But Democrats like Rhonda Glenn are optimistic about Hillary Clinton’s chances. READ MORE

By | October 25th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Analysts Doubt Texas Is A Toss-Up State

Archaeologist Mark McCoy: Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

SMU Research Originally Posted: October 18, 2016 New analysis of chief’s tomb suggests island’s monumental structures are earliest evidence of chiefdom in Pacific — yielding new keys to how societies emerge and evolve New dating on the stone buildings of Nan Madol suggests the ancient coral reef capital in the Pacific Ocean was the earliest among the islands to be ruled by a single chief. The discovery makes Nan Madol a key locale for studying how ancient human societies evolved from simple societies to more complex societies, said archaeologist Mark D. McCoy, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. McCoy led the discovery team. The finding was uncovered as part of a National Geographic expedition to study the monumental tomb said to belong to the first chief of the [...]

By | October 18th, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Archaeologist Mark McCoy: Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

Dale Winkler, Shuler Museum of Paleontology, featured in a series of essays on the Trinity Project, published on Frontburner

D Magazine, Frontburner Originally Posted: October 11, 2016 In addition to Pioneer Cemetery, there’s another quiet space in Dallas that holds the bones of ancestors: the Shuler Museum of Paleontology, located on the SMU campus. The Shuler Museum has no fully assembled skeletons of prehistoric carnivores on premises or other dazzling displays (though the day I visited, there was a stack of giant turtle shells in plaster jackets in the hallway, outside the entrance). For one, the museum is a shoebox of a space located on the basement floor of the Earth Sciences building. There isn’t the room for that sort of thing. Second, the fossils here function as teaching and research collections. A casual visit from a non-expert like me requires an appointment and [...]

By | October 18th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Dale Winkler, Shuler Museum of Paleontology, featured in a series of essays on the Trinity Project, published on Frontburner

“Gender Migration” by Dr. Caroline Brettell, Ruth Collins Altshuler Prof of Anthropology, director of the Interdisciplinary Institute

SMU Research Originally Posted: October 13, 2016 Gender roles, relations, and ideologies are major aspects of migration. In a timely book on the subject, SMU anthropologist Caroline B. Brettell argues that understanding gender relations is vital to a full and more nuanced explanation of both the causes and the consequences of migration, in the past and at present. Gender and Migration (Polity, 2016) explores gendered labor markets, laws and policies, and the transnational model of migration. With that, Brettell tackles a variety of issues such as how gender shapes the roles that men and women play in the construction of immigrant family and community life, debates concerning transnational motherhood, and how gender structures the immigrant experience for men and women more broadly. “I have been [...]

By | October 17th, 2016|Anthropology, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on “Gender Migration” by Dr. Caroline Brettell, Ruth Collins Altshuler Prof of Anthropology, director of the Interdisciplinary Institute

Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science

SMU News Originally Posted: October 12, 2016 We find that the fixed view of the ideal scientist has a significant impact on the ability of both women and men to stay in and succeed in academic science.” — Lincoln, Ecklund Work life in academia might sound like a dream: summers off, year-long sabbaticals, the opportunity to switch between classroom teaching and research. Yet, when it comes to the sciences, life at the top U.S. research universities is hardly idyllic. Based on surveys of over 2,000 junior and senior scientists, both male and female, as well as in-depth interviews, “Failing Families, Failing Science” examines how the rigors of a career in academic science makes it especially difficult to balance family and work. SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln [...]

By | October 13th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science
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