Research on Exercise and Wellness Colloquium Series Features Psychology Assistant Professor, Dr. Austin Baldwin

Talk Abstract: Regular exercise affords many positive effects on health, longevity, and well-being. Despite its many benefits, the majority of adults in the United States do not engage in sufficient levels of regular exercise, and most people who initiate a routine of regular exercise fail to maintain it over time. One intriguing explanation for the widespread lack of regular exercise is that many people experience exercise to be affectively unpleasant, and as a result are less likely to engage in it regularly. In this talk, I will discuss findings across various studies we have conducted that focus on understanding the affective factors that are relevant to exercise and how they might be targeted for intervention. I will also discuss the implications of these findings for [...]

By | 2017-04-27T08:19:35+00:00 April 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Research on Exercise and Wellness Colloquium Series Features Psychology Assistant Professor, Dr. Austin Baldwin

Ron Wetherington, Anthropology, Texas education board to consider compromise on evolution standards

Texas Tribune Originally Posted: April 17 This week's State Board of Education debate about high school biology standards and governing how to teach students about the theory of evolution could come down to a single word: evaluate. At a February meeting, board members took a preliminary vote to modify those curriculum standards, keeping in language that would require students to challenge evolutionary science. Republican board member Barbara Cargill, who led the charge to keep in the controversial language, has said requiring students to "evaluate" certain biological processes is necessary for thorough biology instruction. Critics say keeping the word "evaluate" in those standards casts doubt on evolution in a way that could open the door to teaching creationism. The board is set to hold that debate Tuesday and will take another [...]

By | 2017-04-25T07:06:49+00:00 April 25th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Ron Wetherington, Anthropology, Texas education board to consider compromise on evolution standards

Anthropologist Caroline Brettell elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

SMU News Originally Posted: April 18, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) — Noted SMU anthropologist Caroline Brettell joins actress Carol Burnett, musician John Legend, playwright Lynn Nottage, immunologist James Allison and other renowned leaders in various fields as a newly elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The class of 2017 will be inducted at a ceremony on Saturday, Oct. 7 at the Academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Brettell joins 228 new fellows and foreign honorary members — representing the sciences, the humanities and the arts, business, public affairs and the nonprofit sector — as a member of one of the world’s most prestigious honorary societies. “Caroline Brettell is an internationally recognized leader in the field of migration, and one of Dedman College’s most productive scholars,” said Thomas DiPiero, dean of SMU’s Dedman [...]

By | 2017-04-18T11:53:07+00:00 April 18th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Anthropologist Caroline Brettell elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

LISTEN: Teens In Low-Income Families Get HPV Vaccine If Parents Persuade Themselves Of Benefits

KERA Originally Posted: April 11, 2017 Guilt, social pressure and even a doctor’s recommendation aren't enough to motivate low-income families to vaccinate their teenagers for Human Papillomavirus (HPV), according to research from Southern Methodist University. But a follow-up study from SMU finds that if parents persuade themselves of the benefits of the vaccinations, more teenagers in low-income families receive protection from the sexually transmitted, cancer-causing virus. LISTEN

By | 2017-04-13T07:56:01+00:00 April 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on LISTEN: Teens In Low-Income Families Get HPV Vaccine If Parents Persuade Themselves Of Benefits

Congratulations Caroline Brettell, Anthropology, Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

American Academy of Arts and Sciences Originally Posted: April 12, 2017 American Academy of Arts and Sciences Elects 228 National and International Scholars, Artists, Philanthropists, and Business Leaders The 237th class of members includes philanthropist and singer-songwriter John Legend, award-winning actress Carol Burnett, chairman of the board of Xerox Corporation Ursula Burns, mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani, immunologist James P. Allison, and writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Press Release CAMBRIDGE, MA | APRIL 12, 2017 — The American Academy of Arts and Sciences today announced the election of 228 new members. They include some of the world’s most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists, as well as civic, business, and philanthropic leaders. The list of the 237th class of new members is available at www.amacad.org/members. Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts [...]

By | 2017-04-12T07:31:34+00:00 April 12th, 2017|Anthropology, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congratulations Caroline Brettell, Anthropology, Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Aspects of gorgonopsian paleobiology and evolution: insights from the basicranium, occiput, osseous labyrinth, vasculature, and neuroanatomy

PeerJ Originally Posted: April 13, 2017 SMU Earth Science professors issue new paper on "Aspects of gorgonopsian paleobiology and evolution: insights from the basicranium, occiput, osseous labyrinth, vasculature, and neuroanatomy."   Araújo R, Fernandez V, Polcyn MJ, Fröbisch J, Martins RMS. (2017) Aspects of gorgonopsian paleobiology and evolution: insights from the basicranium, occiput, osseous labyrinth, vasculature, and neuroanatomy. PeerJ5:e3119 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.3119

By | 2017-04-13T10:16:15+00:00 April 11th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Aspects of gorgonopsian paleobiology and evolution: insights from the basicranium, occiput, osseous labyrinth, vasculature, and neuroanatomy

Congratulations Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi recently awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship

Tower Center Blog Originally Posted: April 5, 2017 Three SMU professors Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi were awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship for 2017-2018. The award, designed to increase research and scholarship and to enhance teaching effectiveness, gives SMU faculty members up to $5,000 for their research, which contributes to what President Bush referred to as the New World Order. Sabri Ates, associate professor of history, will use the award to finish writing his book Seyyid Abdulqadir Nehri’s Pursuit of an Independent Kurdistan. With the recent developments in Iraq, Syria and Turkey the question of Kurdish statelessness is becoming more pressing. Ates explores what historical conditions account for how the Kurds became the largest ethnic group without its own nation. His book [...]

By | 2017-04-11T10:02:57+00:00 April 11th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, Political Science|Comments Off on Congratulations Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi recently awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship

David Millimet, Economics, A Weaker EPA May Not Mean The Environment Goes To Hell But It Could Lead To Greater Disparities Between States

FiveThirtyEight Originally Posted: April 7, 2017 Last week, President Trump signed a broad executive order that’s primarily aimed at promoting the use of coal and curbing Obama-era efforts to reduce America’s greenhouse-gas emissions. The Trump administration sees its new rules as a crucial path to creating coal-industry jobs and making America energy-independent — though economists say it’s unlikely to achieve those goals. Meanwhile, among people concerned about the risks of long-term climate change, the order has been interpreted as an attack, a dismantling of environmental protections, and an example of the president’s particular animosity toward the Environmental Protection Agency. But if Trump really does have an ax to grind with the EPA, he’s not the first world leader to sit down at that whetstone. Politicians [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:37:43+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on David Millimet, Economics, A Weaker EPA May Not Mean The Environment Goes To Hell But It Could Lead To Greater Disparities Between States

Archaeologist explains innovation of ‘fluting’ ancient stone weaponry

Phys.org Originally Posted: April 6, 2017 Approximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years. Kent State University's Metin Eren, Ph.D., director of archaeology and assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences, and his colleagues are not only asking these questions but testing their unique new theories. They want to better understand the engineering, techniques and purposes of Clovis weapon technologies. Specifically, they study stone projectile points, such as arrowheads and spear points, [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:20:09+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Archaeologist explains innovation of ‘fluting’ ancient stone weaponry

Congratulations to Dr. Mark Chancey, 2017 Guggenheim Fellow

READ MORE Mark A. Chancey is a Professor of Religious Studies in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. Chancey will use his Guggenheim Fellowship to continue work on his next monograph, The Good Book as Textbook: Teaching about the Bible in American Public Schools. Chancey will explore the legal, political, and academic issues raised by K-12 Bible courses while tracing their evolution from the early twentieth century to the present. With topics ranging from curricula and court cases to Vidalia onion fundraisers, Chuck Norris videos, and death threats, the project provides opportunities to reflect on the civic functions of religious literacy, the purposes of public education, the contested nature of American identity in times of changing religious and ethnic demographics, [...]

By | 2017-04-07T10:50:25+00:00 April 7th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on Congratulations to Dr. Mark Chancey, 2017 Guggenheim Fellow
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