Political Firestorm Between Texas Republicans Over Harvey Relief Aid

CBS DFW Originally Posted: October 12, 2017 A source tells CBS11, Governor Abbott felt let down by Texas Republicans in the House for a lack of leadership and for not fighting hard enough for Harvey relief. Texas Governor Greg Abbott delivers a briefing to the public on Hurricane Harvey at the Texas Department of Public Safety building on September 1, 2017 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images) The Governor told the Houston Chronicle Wednesday that the Texas delegation in the House of Representatives needed a “stiff spine” and that “It appears the Texas delegation will let themselves be rolled by the House of Representatives.” SMU Political Science Professor Matthew Wilson says it’s not just the words, but the man who said them [...]

By | 2017-10-13T10:24:33+00:00 October 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Political Firestorm Between Texas Republicans Over Harvey Relief Aid

A composite window into human history

SMU Research Originally Posted: October 3, 2017 Better integration of ancient DNA studies with archaeology promises deeper insights. DNA testing alone of ancient human remains can’t resolve questions about past societies. It’s time for geneticists and archaeologists to collaborate more fully in the face of ever greater advancements in ancient DNA research, according to SMU archaeologist David J. Meltzer and his colleagues in a recent article in the scientific journal Science. The authors write in “A composite window into human history” that over the past decade, DNA testing of ancient human remains has become a valuable tool for studying and understanding past human population histories. Most notably, for example, is how sequencing of ancient genomes resolved the dispute over our species’ evolutionary relationship with Neanderthals, the authors point [...]

By | 2017-10-12T11:33:50+00:00 October 12th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on A composite window into human history

Congratulations to SMU Anthropologist Caroline Brettell inducted to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on Oct. 7

SMU News Originally Posted: October 6, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) — Noted SMU anthropologist Caroline Brettell will be inducted as a fellow into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences during a ceremony on Saturday, Oct. 7, at the Academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, Mass. Brettell joins 228 new fellows and foreign honorary members — representing the sciences, the humanities and the arts, business, public affairs and the nonprofit sector — as a member of one of the world’s most prestigious honorary societies. “Caroline Brettell is an internationally recognized leader in the field of migration, and one of Dedman College’s most productive scholars,” said Thomas DiPiero, dean of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. “I couldn’t be happier to see her win this well-deserved accolade.” “I am surprised and deeply honored to receive [...]

By | 2017-10-07T09:53:21+00:00 October 7th, 2017|Anthropology, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congratulations to SMU Anthropologist Caroline Brettell inducted to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on Oct. 7

Listen: Neil Foley, History, Racism towards Latinos: Past, present, and future

Ballpark Podcast Originally Posted: September 27, 2017 The current US president is not the first American leader to use inflammatory rhetoric about Latinos and push anti-immigration policies, but Donald Trump’s presidency has certainly brought these issue to the forefront of American politics. This episode we’re diving into the fear, resentment, and history behind racism towards Latinos, and in doing so, we’ll see that this is far from a recent phenomenon. This episode features Neil Foley, Robert and Nancy Dedman Endowed Chair in History at Southern Methodist University. He the author of Quest for Equality: The Failed Promise of Black-Brown Solidarity and Mexicans and the Making of America, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2015. Our discussion includes Susannah Crockford, Research Officer for Inform and [...]

By | 2017-09-27T12:52:06+00:00 September 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Listen: Neil Foley, History, Racism towards Latinos: Past, present, and future

Heather DeShon, Earth Sciences, new study finds that the fault that produced North Texas’ largest quake could produce an even bigger one

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: September 25, 2017 The  town that experienced a 4-magnitude earthquake in May 2015 — the strongest quake ever recorded in North Texas  — sits on a fault with the potential to produce an event 10 times larger,  suggests a new study led by scientists at Southern Methodist University. The report also concluded there was “substantial evidence” that the quake, near the Johnson County town of Venus, was triggered by the underground disposal of wastewater from oil and gas operations. The study was the latest to investigate North Texas’ earthquake surge, which began in 2008 and has generated more than 200 tremors. The most recent widely felt event was a 3.1-magnitude quake that struck near the border of Irving and Dallas on Aug. 25. READ [...]

By | 2017-09-26T08:03:38+00:00 September 26th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Heather DeShon, Earth Sciences, new study finds that the fault that produced North Texas’ largest quake could produce an even bigger one

Researchers ask, how did that leaf get so big?

Dallas Innovates Originally Poster: September 22, 2017 The work of Southern Methodist University paleobotanist Bonnie F. Jacobs to help crack the mystery of leaf size recently got some recognition in Australian Geographic. Jacobs, a professor in SMU’s Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, worked with a team of international researchers from — the United Kingdom, Canada, Argentina, Estonia, Spain, China, and the U.S. — and their work was published earlier this month as a cover story in Science. The team looked at 7,600 plant species over the past 20 years and pooled and analyzed the data with new theory in the field. Their goal is to create equations that can predict the maximum viable leaf size anywhere in the world based on two factors — daytime overheating and night-time freezing. That [...]

By | 2017-09-24T19:19:10+00:00 September 24th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Researchers ask, how did that leaf get so big?

Congrats! Dedman College alumna Katie Logsdon and Dr. Smith-Morris, Anthropology, published in Midwifery Journal

Originally Posted: September 22, 2017 "As an undergraduate at SMU, I knew many opportunities existed for me to conduct research... Dr. Smith-Morris immediately encouraged me in my ideas and refined my research."-Katie Logsdon, #DedmanCollege '17, whose manuscript on her undergraduate research in Amsterdam with the SMU Department of Anthropology's Dr. Smith-Morris was published in the October edition of Midwifery Journal. Congratulations on this accomplishment, Katie! Read her research here: http://ow.ly/FWe030fkshV

By | 2017-09-22T10:53:22+00:00 September 22nd, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congrats! Dedman College alumna Katie Logsdon and Dr. Smith-Morris, Anthropology, published in Midwifery Journal

Pia Orrenius, Tower Center, Effects of E-Verify on Unauthorized Immigrant Employment and Population

Tower Center Blog Originally Posted: September 11, 2017 Tower Center Senior Fellow Pia Orrenius published a new study with the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Digital Enforcement, on the effects of the E-Verify system on the employment of immigrants. The E-Verify system requires employers in some states to electronically verify the immigration status of workers before they can be hired. “E-Verify, when it’s mandatory and all employers have to use it, can have very large deterrent effects on the employment of undocumented immigrants and possibly also on the immigration of undocumented immigrants or illegal immigration,” Orrenius said. READ MORE

By | 2017-09-21T16:51:37+00:00 September 21st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Tower Center|Comments Off on Pia Orrenius, Tower Center, Effects of E-Verify on Unauthorized Immigrant Employment and Population

Human Trafficking: North Texan Shares Her Survivor Story At SMU Conference

CBS News Originally Posted: September 14, 2017 DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Rebekah Charleston survived ten years of being trapped in the world of human trafficking. She shared her life story at the SMU Embrey Human Rights Program’s community workshop aimed at combating the problem. During the seminar, she recalled the time when she escaped her trafficker. “I knew I had 20 months to start my life over before he hunted me down and killed me. When someone beats you so brutally that you have blood dripping out of your mouth from your gums being cut on your teeth, you tend to believe them when they say they’ll kill you.” Charleston says the recent hurricanes, Harvey and Irma, can make women even more vulnerable — and that traffickers [...]

By | 2017-09-15T07:42:20+00:00 September 15th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on Human Trafficking: North Texan Shares Her Survivor Story At SMU Conference
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