Teaching America to Read Was the Perfect Life Mission for Barbara Bush

Fortune Magazine Originally Posted: April 18, 2018 Center For Presidential History Director, Jeff Engel lends expertise to Fortune Magazine on the legacy of Barbara Bush. Barbara Bush, who died Tuesday night at 92, is only the second first lady in American history to have both married and birthed a president. (Abigail Adams was the first.) But while that tidbit will inevitably make its way into the history books, her initiative to promote literacy is the core tenet of her legacy. First ladies often pick areas of policy to champion—and Bush chose literacy. She launched a literacy foundation in her name in 1989, the first year of her husband’s presidency. The goal of the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy is to ensure that every child, [...]

By | 2018-04-24T07:52:29+00:00 April 24th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Teaching America to Read Was the Perfect Life Mission for Barbara Bush

Listen: Jeffrey Engel, CPH, Unpacking The Confusing Signals We’re Getting from the Mueller Probe

WDET Originally Posted: April 11, 2018 We have become accustomed to the weekly news cycle being interrupted by the quarter turn of information about Robert Mueller’s investigation into the 2016 presidential election. But this week saw a blockbuster emerge. FBI agents raided the office and home of Michael Cohen, the personal attorney of President Trump. The federal agents reportedly seized documents related to the president’s alleged affairs with two women, including Stormy Daniels. That raid is awfully close to the president himself, a fact which is reflected in Trump’s response. Trump sent an angry series of tweets practically accusing Mueller of treason. Barbara McQuade is former U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, and current law professor at the University of Michigan. She says though the FBI went to Cohen’s office for files related to alleged affairs [...]

By | 2018-04-17T09:26:56+00:00 April 12th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Listen: Jeffrey Engel, CPH, Unpacking The Confusing Signals We’re Getting from the Mueller Probe

APA Div. 50 Features Dr. Lui

Department of Psychology News Originally Posted: April 12, 2018 Division 50 of the American Psychological Association, the Society of Addiction Psychology, featured Dr. Priscilla Lui as an Early Career Psychologist in their Spring 2018 newsletter. Click here to see the spotlight on Dr. Lui.

By | 2018-04-12T08:56:47+00:00 April 12th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on APA Div. 50 Features Dr. Lui

Political review on border security and the trade dispute

Fox 4 Originally Posted: April 8, 2018 Dr. Victoria Farrar-Myers from SMU takes a look at the topics from Washington D.C. this week and the impact on the 2018 midterm elections. http://www.fox4news.com/good-day/political-review-on-border-security-and-the-trade-dispute  

By | 2018-04-10T09:04:08+00:00 April 10th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science, Tower Center|Comments Off on Political review on border security and the trade dispute

Animations that are true to life

UC Merced UC Merced News highlighted Department of Mathematics visiting assistant professor, Vu Thai Luan's research collaboration. Professor Luan is developing computational tools that will allow animators to produce the next generation of true-to-life simulations. Imagine going to see the latest Pixar movie. You’re sitting in the theater enjoying the film, when you begin to notice the astounding level of detail in the animation. On screen, water is rippling and leaves are flittering with an almost uncanny realism. It’s art imitating life with incredible verisimilitude, and it makes you wonder how the animators are able to pull off such lifelike effects. The answer, at least in part, lies in mathematics. With support from the National Science Foundation, UC Merced professor Mayya Tokman and her collaborators — professor Dominik Michels of [...]

By | 2018-04-10T08:49:46+00:00 April 10th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Mathematics|Comments Off on Animations that are true to life

How DACA Helps Curb Teen Pregnancy

The Atlantic Originally Posted: April 5, 2018 Research shows the program, which protects undocumented young immigrants from deportation, encourages them to stay in school and delay parenthood. Daca, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is the Obama-era policy that allows 1.3 million undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children to stay and work here legally. Those who meet the criteria are protected from deportation for a period of two years, which can be renewed.The Trump administration plunged this program into a state of uncertainty last September. First, it announced the end of daca, saying the program wouldn’t be accepting new applicants and that everyone would be kicked out of the program starting March 5 of this year. However, a series of temporary court rulings earlier this year blocked the [...]

By | 2018-04-06T03:07:44+00:00 April 6th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on How DACA Helps Curb Teen Pregnancy

Moving toward greater security: The effects of repeatedly priming attachment security and anxiety

Journal of Research in Personality Originally Posted: April 3, 2018 New research from SMU psychology professor Nate Hudson shows that healthy attachment within relationships can be improved by having people repeatedly reflect on their close relationships.   Highlights: • Participants were repeatedly primed with attachment security across 4 months. • As compared with a control group, security priming increased security across time. • Priming attachment anxiety repeatedly produced similar results to priming security. Abstract Contemporary models of personality development suggest that state-level changes that are maintained for long periods of time have the potential to coalesce into more enduring trait-level changes. In this research, we explored whether repeatedly increasing participants’ state-level attachment security via priming might educe trait-level changes over the course of four months. Results [...]

By | 2018-04-04T08:52:34+00:00 April 4th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Moving toward greater security: The effects of repeatedly priming attachment security and anxiety

Lawrence Wright Falls Out of Love With Texas

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: April 2018 issue The follow is a review by Andrew R. Graybill, chair of the history department and co-director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. Lawrence Wright had his road-to-Damascus moment in 1979 in Gruene, the quaint Hill Country town halfway between San Antonio and Austin. At the time, he was living in Georgia, writing for a regional magazine and freelancing for various national publications. Although the Oklahoma-born Wright had spent his teenage years in Dallas, where his father was a bank president, he’d escaped the state’s centripetal pull once he graduated from high school, in 1965, leaving first for college in New Orleans and then accepting a teaching position at the American University [...]

By | 2018-03-27T08:16:17+00:00 March 27th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Lawrence Wright Falls Out of Love With Texas

Facebook as an election weapon, from Obama to Trump

Phys.org Originally Posted: March 23, 2018   Victoria Farrar-Myers, quoted below in the March 23 article from Phys.org, is the Director of the Tower Scholars Program.   The use of Facebook data to target voters has triggered global outrage with the Cambridge Analytica scandal. But the concept is nothing new: Barack Obama made extensive use of the social network in 2008 and stepped up "micro-targeting" in his 2012 re-election effort. The unauthorized gathering of data on 50 million Facebook users by a British consulting firm that worked for Donald Trump has sparked intense debate on how politicians and marketers—appropriately or not—use such personal information. But Cambridge Analytica, the firm at the center of the firestorm, has stressed it is far from alone in using data gleaned [...]

By | 2018-03-23T12:09:57+00:00 March 23rd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science, Tower Center|Comments Off on Facebook as an election weapon, from Obama to Trump
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