New delta Scuti: Rare pulsating star 7,000 light years away is 1 of only 7 in Milky Way

EurekaAlert! Originally Posted: February 14, 2017 Astronomers are reporting a rare star as big -- or bigger -- than the Earth's sun and that is expanding and contracting in a unique pattern in three different directions. The star is one that pulsates and so is characterized by varying brightness over time. It's situated 7,000 light years away from the Earth in the constellation Pegasus, said astronomer Farley Ferrante, a member of the team that made the discovery at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Called a variable star, this particular star is one of only seven known stars of its kind in our Milky Way galaxy. "It was challenging to identify it," Ferrante said. "This is the first time we'd encountered this rare type." The Milky Way [...]

By | February 15th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on New delta Scuti: Rare pulsating star 7,000 light years away is 1 of only 7 in Milky Way

Mexico trade war would put Texas economy, jobs at stake

Dallas News Originally Posted: January 31, 2017 The Texas economy is already pretty great, and Mexico is one of the key reasons. That’s worth remembering when President Donald Trump threatens a trade war over a border wall, as he did last week. Economically, there’s more at stake for Texas than any other state in the country. Mexico is our most important trading partner by far. In 2015, Texas exported over $92 billion in goods to Mexico, which was more than it exported to the next 10 countries combined. Texas imports from Mexico were almost as high and were twice as high as from China, next on the list. Perhaps the most impressive number: Texas exports supported over 1 million jobs in 2015, according to government [...]

By | January 31st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science, Tower Center|Comments Off on Mexico trade war would put Texas economy, jobs at stake

Robert Howell, Philosophy, commentary, the prescription to cure political malpractice

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: January 28, 2017 It's time to ask: What's so great about democracy? I don't mean we should doubt that democracy is the best approach to government. I think we should remind ourselves why it is. Spoiler alert: It's not because it results in the best leaders. Democracy is valuable even if it doesn't always generate the optimal outcome. Governing ought not be done without the consent of the governed; the democratic process is the way we as a people give our consent. If a democratic government often lumbers along, therefore, with policies that are unwise and ill informed, and even when it elects leaders whose popular appeal exceeds their competence, at least it is a government that rules at the [...]

By | January 31st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Philosophy|Comments Off on Robert Howell, Philosophy, commentary, the prescription to cure political malpractice

Jeff Engel, Center for Presidential History, joins Good Day on FOX4 to discuss Trump’s executive orders on immigration and refugees

Fox4 Originally Posted: January 30, 2017 WATCH video of Jeff Engel, Directory of the Center for Presidential History discuss President Trumps recent executive orders regarding immigration and refugees. WASHINGTON (AP) - The White House on Sunday vigorously defended President Donald Trump's immigration restrictions, as protests against the order spread throughout the country. Some Republicans in Congress publicly opposed the changes amid legal challenges to the order banning travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries, though top congressional Republicans remain largely behind the new president. In a background call with reporters, a senior administration official declared the order's implementation "a massive success story," claiming it had been done "seamlessly and with extraordinary professionalism." WATCH

By | January 30th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeff Engel, Center for Presidential History, joins Good Day on FOX4 to discuss Trump’s executive orders on immigration and refugees

Maria Richards of SMU takes over Presidency at Geothermal Resources Council

Think GeoEnergy Originally Posted: January 26, 2017   The Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) has welcomed Maria Richards as the 26th President of the global geothermal energy organization, succeeding Paul Brophy. Maria Richards, SMUMaria Richards is the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Geothermal Laboratory Coordinator in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in Dallas, Texas. Her research is on geothermal resources and energy development. Maria’s previous projects include updating the Geothermal Map of North America, developing temperature maps for Google.org, and on?site geothermal exploration in the Peruvian Amazon and the Northern Mariana Islands. Producing geothermal energy from oil and gas fields is one of her research goals, thus works directly with technology companies and the oil and gas industry to find overlapping opportunities. As an [...]

By | January 26th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Maria Richards of SMU takes over Presidency at Geothermal Resources Council

Danila Serra, Economics, Does Corruption Happen Slowly, or All at Once?

The Atlantic Originally Posted: January 26, 2017 If someone’s about to go into a cold swimming pool, they’ll probably use one of two tactics. They might dip a toe in, wade in to the ankles, and slowly, slowly inch their body into the water until they’re completely submerged. Or they’ll just cannonball in, and get it over with. If it’s not a cold swimming pool someone is entering, but rather the icy waters of corruption, which of these two strategies will they choose? Many would say the first; corruption is often characterized as a “slippery slope,” something into which a person or organization slowly descends as more and more small immoral acts add up. But a new study published in Psychological Science argues that people are more likely to [...]

By | January 26th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Danila Serra, Economics, Does Corruption Happen Slowly, or All at Once?

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Trump’s Inauguration Day: beyond the pageantry, after the boycotts

Christian Science Monitor Originally Posted: January 20, 2017 It’s show time. The bands are tuning up, revelers and protesters alike are ready with their signs and their voices, and Donald Trump – businessman, showman, political maverick – is about to step into the role of a lifetime. At noon on Friday, Mr. Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, the next stage in a journey as improbable as any in American politics. Just as eight years ago, when Barack Obama carried the hopes of millions into office with him, so too does the larger-than-life Trump. But the notes of discord are much louder. Political polarization has only grown deeper, and shows no sign of abating. Trump enters office the [...]

By | January 23rd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Cal Jillson, Political Science, Trump’s Inauguration Day: beyond the pageantry, after the boycotts

Request for Proposals for Annual Fellows Seminar, 2017-2018

The Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute is now soliciting proposals from faculty for an Annual Fellows Seminar for the 2017-2018 Academic Year. For application details, please see: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Programs/AnnualFellowsSeminars. Deadline is March 3rd, 2017.

By | January 18th, 2017|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Request for Proposals for Annual Fellows Seminar, 2017-2018

The danger of Trump’s tweets

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: January 17, 2017 About the Author: Robert J. Howell is Dedman Family Distinguished Professor of Philosophy in SMU's Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.  He earned his Ph.D. in philosophy from Brown University and joined SMU in 2002.  His areas of specialization are philosophy of the mind, epistemology and metaphysics. Howell was featured in a fall 2016 program hosted by SMU's Center for Presidential History titled, "Are We Too Dumb for Democracy?" I don't think we should worry too much about Meryl Streep. Her cred can withstand some silly tweets from our President-elect, and she has chosen to live in the public eye. But this recent episode of twitter abuse is merely the tip of the iceberg and we need to [...]

By | January 17th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Philosophy|Comments Off on The danger of Trump’s tweets
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