SMU Dedman College alumnus up for 2017 Most Valuable Philanthropist in Sports

All Stars of Giving Originally Posted: June 1, 2017 The New York Jets' (& SMU #DedmanCollege's) Kelvin Beachum Jr. is up for Most Valuable Philanthropist 2017. Help a #Mustang out! Vote through July 1. https://asu.givkwik.com/public?champion=KelvinBeachum Kelvin Beachum supporting... Beachum Charitable Fund Kelvin Beachum is committed to helping young people, especially minority and disadvantaged youth, develop the habits and skills for success. He has a special focus on encouraging minority youth to engage STEM-centric disciplines and STEM careers, especially in robotics, computer programming, automotive, and aviation. In addition to his commitments with the NFL, Beachum is known for his dedication to ending hunger by working directly with hunger advocacy groups like Bread for the World and World Vision, and supporting community food banks across America. He [...]

By | 2017-06-12T08:23:27+00:00 June 12th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics|Comments Off on SMU Dedman College alumnus up for 2017 Most Valuable Philanthropist in Sports

Inspired by refugee parents, SMU grad unites three degrees with community outreach to empower others

SMU News Originally Posted: May 31, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) – As a newly minted SMU graduate with three degrees, Kovan Barzani not only has exceeded his Kurdish-American parents’ expectations, but also reinforced their decision to flee Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s brutal regime for “peace and peace of mind” in the U.S. While weighing three college scholarships during his last year at Liberty High School in Frisco, Kovan recalls his mother’s singular request, delivered with a smile: “Be sure to get at least two degrees – one for you and one for me.” As it happens, Kovan chose SMU precisely because it could offer not two but the three degrees he sought – in economics, public policy and management – while helping him cultivate the three virtues most valued by his family: [...]

By | 2017-06-09T07:55:57+00:00 June 9th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics, Political Science, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Inspired by refugee parents, SMU grad unites three degrees with community outreach to empower others

SMU alumnus Kelvin Beachum connects STEM and football

University Herald Originally Posted: May 30, 2017 New York Jets tackle Kelvin Beachum is aware that not everyone can become a pro football player but anyone can pursue a flourishing career in STEM. This is his mission as he goes around schools to encourage kids as they meet him. Like all other NFL stars, Beachum knows the importance of engaging fans in order to make a connection with them. However, he wants to go beyond the superficial and make a difference in the lives of millions of his fans, especially the students. So when Beachum was not training or playing, people can find him in schools and in classrooms helping students develop a passion for engineering, robotics, coding, and other STEM-related disciplines and activities. READ MORE

By | 2017-05-31T10:59:43+00:00 June 5th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics|Comments Off on SMU alumnus Kelvin Beachum connects STEM and football

Elira Kuka, economics, appointed to prestigious national research organization

SMU Research Originally Posted: May 10, 2017 SMU economics professor wins prestigious appointment to nation’s premier organization for impartial economic research, the National Bureau of Economic Research. The National Bureau of Economic Research, the nation’s leading nonprofit economic research organization, has appointed SMU Assistant Professor Elira Kuka a faculty research fellow. Kuka is in the SMU Department of Economics. She will be a fellow in the NBER’s research program on children, a key policy area. NBER, founded in 1920, is a private, non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to conducting economic research and to disseminating research findings among academics, public policy makers and business professionals. The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) is the most prestigious and active research organization in economic policy and empirical analysis in [...]

By | 2017-05-22T08:36:38+00:00 May 22nd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Elira Kuka, economics, appointed to prestigious national research organization

Dedman College economics experts quoted in Forbes. Move Over, San Francisco: Dallas Tops Our List Of The Best Cities For Jobs 2017

Forbes Originally Posted: May 15, 2017 Dallas is called the Big D for a reason. Bigger, better, best: that’s the Dallas mindset. From the gigantic Cowboys stadium in Arlington to the burgeoning northern suburbs to the posh Arts District downtown, Dallasites are reinventing their metropolis almost daily. The proposed urban park along the Trinity River, my Dallas friends remind me, will be 11 times bigger than New York’s Central Park. Here’s something else for them to boast about: the Dallas-Plano-Irving metropolitan area ranks first this year on our list of the Best Cities For Jobs. It’s a region that in many ways is the polar opposite of the San Francisco and San Jose metropolitan areas, which have dominated our ranking for the last few years. (They still [...]

By | 2017-05-17T14:23:41+00:00 May 17th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Dedman College economics experts quoted in Forbes. Move Over, San Francisco: Dallas Tops Our List Of The Best Cities For Jobs 2017

David Millimet, Economics, A Weaker EPA May Not Mean The Environment Goes To Hell But It Could Lead To Greater Disparities Between States

FiveThirtyEight Originally Posted: April 7, 2017 Last week, President Trump signed a broad executive order that’s primarily aimed at promoting the use of coal and curbing Obama-era efforts to reduce America’s greenhouse-gas emissions. The Trump administration sees its new rules as a crucial path to creating coal-industry jobs and making America energy-independent — though economists say it’s unlikely to achieve those goals. Meanwhile, among people concerned about the risks of long-term climate change, the order has been interpreted as an attack, a dismantling of environmental protections, and an example of the president’s particular animosity toward the Environmental Protection Agency. But if Trump really does have an ax to grind with the EPA, he’s not the first world leader to sit down at that whetstone. Politicians [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:37:43+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on David Millimet, Economics, A Weaker EPA May Not Mean The Environment Goes To Hell But It Could Lead To Greater Disparities Between States

From the middle of The Mob: An insider’s look at SMU’s rowdy, courtside student fan section

SMU News Originally Posted: March 13, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) - The sound of the dribble-smack against wood, sneaker-screech on slick panels and screaming voices all reverberate in Moody Coliseum whenever an opponent challenges the Mustangs on their home court. In the heart of this commotion sits The Mob – that wild rabble of rambunctious student fans – who unlike most mobs, boldly bear their membership across their chests. Whenever the men’s basketball team was in the house this season, so was one of the proudest members of The Mob. Tammy Winter is an SMU senior Economics and Public Policy major who never missed a game – or celebrity appearance - in the last two years she's been cheering for her Mustangs with The Mob. Few [...]

By | 2017-03-17T06:44:46+00:00 March 17th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics, Political Science|Comments Off on From the middle of The Mob: An insider’s look at SMU’s rowdy, courtside student fan section

Dallas’ Most Innovative Health Care Startup: BioLum

Dallas Innovates Originally Posted: March 9, 2017 The Tritex Group is always on the hunt for the latest and greatest talent in Dallas’ startup community. As one out of 10 people in the U.S. suffer from asthma, it did not take long to find a group of three hungry entrepreneurs who are innovating asthma management. New technology has been developed to help parents and patients better manage the chronic illness on a day to day basis. Yes, there is an app for that, thanks to Dallas-based BioLum Sciences. Started by three former Southern Methodist University students, Edward Allegra, Jack Reynolds, and Miguel Quimbar, BioLum Sciences is entering its third year of operation. Their product is a mobile health solution for asthma management. The device analyzes [...]

By | 2017-03-14T18:33:11+00:00 March 14th, 2017|Biology, Dedman College Research, Economics, Graduate News|Comments Off on Dallas’ Most Innovative Health Care Startup: BioLum

Tower Scholar Q&A | My time as a campaign manager

Tower Center Blog Originally Posted: February 2, 2017 Kovan Barzani is a Junior from Plano, Texas triple majoring in Economics, Public Policy and Management with a minor in political science.  Highland Capital Management Tower Scholar Kovan Barzani, class of 2017, managed Jim Burke’s 2016 campaign for the Texas House of Representatives District 114 in Dallas. Barzani started out as a Fellow at the Dallas County Democratic Party, and within a month he was running Burke’s campaign. Barzani is triple majoring in economics, public policy and management. Upon graduation in May he will be working for Capital One in Dallas as a business analyst. The Tower Center sat down with Barzani to hear his story. How did you become Jim Burke’s campaign manager? During my first couple of days as a [...]

By | 2017-02-08T07:29:07+00:00 February 8th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Political Science, Tower Center, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Tower Scholar Q&A | My time as a campaign manager

Danila Serra, Economics, Does Corruption Happen Slowly, or All at Once?

The Atlantic Originally Posted: January 26, 2017 If someone’s about to go into a cold swimming pool, they’ll probably use one of two tactics. They might dip a toe in, wade in to the ankles, and slowly, slowly inch their body into the water until they’re completely submerged. Or they’ll just cannonball in, and get it over with. If it’s not a cold swimming pool someone is entering, but rather the icy waters of corruption, which of these two strategies will they choose? Many would say the first; corruption is often characterized as a “slippery slope,” something into which a person or organization slowly descends as more and more small immoral acts add up. But a new study published in Psychological Science argues that people are more likely to [...]

By | 2017-01-26T08:29:53+00:00 January 26th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Danila Serra, Economics, Does Corruption Happen Slowly, or All at Once?
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