Dale Winkler, Shuler Museum of Paleontology, featured in a series of essays on the Trinity Project, published on Frontburner

D Magazine, Frontburner Originally Posted: October 11, 2016 In addition to Pioneer Cemetery, there’s another quiet space in Dallas that holds the bones of ancestors: the Shuler Museum of Paleontology, located on the SMU campus. The Shuler Museum has no fully assembled skeletons of prehistoric carnivores on premises or other dazzling displays (though the day I visited, there was a stack of giant turtle shells in plaster jackets in the hallway, outside the entrance). For one, the museum is a shoebox of a space located on the basement floor of the Earth Sciences building. There isn’t the room for that sort of thing. Second, the fossils here function as teaching and research collections. A casual visit from a non-expert like me requires an appointment and [...]

By | October 18th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Dale Winkler, Shuler Museum of Paleontology, featured in a series of essays on the Trinity Project, published on Frontburner

Geophysics in Alaska 2016

SMU Adventures Originally Posted: September 27, 2016 Two SMU graduate student researchers, with SMU Professor of Geophysics Matthew Hornbach, traveled to the Beaufort Sea, north of Alaska, to participate in a research project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to chart heat flow and chirp data on the ocean floor. This research project team, which includes two geophysicists from Oregon State University: Dr. Robert Harris and SMU alumnus Dr. Ben Phrampus ’15, is working aboard the Norseman II research vessel. READ MORE

By | September 27th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Geophysics in Alaska 2016

Watch: SMU geophysics professor discusses earthquake

FOX 4 Originally Posted: September 4, 2016 A 5.6 magnitude earthquake hit Oklahoma Saturday morning, prompting officials to shut down dozens of waste water disposal wells within a 500-square-mile area of the quake's epicenter. The earthquake tied the record for the strongest ever recorded in Oklahoma. The earthquake epicenter was about 9 miles northwest of Pawnee. One surveillance video from a public school in North Central Oklahoma shows the moment the tremors started. The Oklahoma Corporation Commission ordered that 35 wells be shut down due to evidence that links earthquakes to the underground disposal of wastewater from oil and gas production. WATCH

By | September 6th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Watch: SMU geophysics professor discusses earthquake

Six Dedman College faculty members recommended for tenure and promotion

Congratulations to the faculty members who are newly tenured or have been promoted to full professorships to begin the 2016-17 academic year. Recommended for tenure and promotion to Full Professor: Heather DeShon, Earth Sciences Scott Norris, Mathematics Rubén Sánchez-Godoy, World Languages and Literatures (Spanish) Hervé Tchumkam, World Languages and Literatures (French) Nicolay Tsarevsky, Chemistry Recommended for promotion to Full Professor: Matthew Hornbach, Earth Sciences For the full SMU faculty list READ MORE

By | August 8th, 2016|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Mathematics, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on Six Dedman College faculty members recommended for tenure and promotion

Scientists offer explanation on how oil and gas activity triggers North Texas earthquakes

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: July 25, 2016 In a long-awaited study, researchers have offered a possible explanation for how oil and gas activity may have triggered earthquakes in Dallas and Irving last year. The disposal of wastewater from oil and gas production and hydraulic fracturing “plausibly” set off the tremors, which shook Dallas, Irving, Highland Park and other cities from April 2014 through January 2016, said Matthew Hornbach, the study’s lead author and professor of geophysics at Southern Methodist University. While the quakes were too small to cause much damage to buildings, they spread alarm through a metro area unaccustomed to feeling the ground shift. The quakes contributed to a tenfold increase in North Texas’ earthquake hazard level, prompted the Federal Emergency Management Agency [...]

By | July 26th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Scientists offer explanation on how oil and gas activity triggers North Texas earthquakes

Meet the Scientist, Paleontology

Originally Posted: June 29, 2016 SMU alumna, Katharina Marino, who used to prepare fossils in the Shuler labs and then worked as an educator at the Perot Museum, is now pursuing a Master's degree in science communication at the University of Otago in New Zealand.  She has started a blog in which she interviews scientists.  Her first interviewee is another SMU alum, Yuri Kimura, who received her Ph.D. at the same time Katharina received her Bachelor's degree.  Please click the link below to read this very nice interview from two of our finest. https://therockrecord.wordpress.com/2016/05/30/meet-dr-yuri-kimura/

New study by geophysicists Zhong Lu, professor, Shuler-Foscue Chair, and Jin-Woo Kim research scientist, Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, finds massive sinkholes are unstable

Science Daily Originally Posted: June 14, 2016 Geohazard: Giant sinkholes near West Texas oil patch towns are growing -- as new ones lurk Satellite radar images reveal ground movement of infamous sinkholes near Wink, Texas; suggest 2 existing holes are expanding, and new ones are forming as nearby subsidence occurs at an alarming rate Two giant sinkholes that sit between two West Texas oil patch towns are growing -- and two new ones appear to be lurking, say geophysicists. Satellite radar images reveal substantial ground movement in and around the infamous sinkholes near Wink, Texas -- suggesting expansion of the two existing holes, with subsidence in two other nearby areas suggesting new ones may surface. READ MORE  

By | June 16th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on New study by geophysicists Zhong Lu, professor, Shuler-Foscue Chair, and Jin-Woo Kim research scientist, Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, finds massive sinkholes are unstable

Geohazard: Giant sinkholes near West Texas oil patch towns are growing — as new ones lurk

SMU Research Originally Posted: June 13, 2016 Residents of Wink and neighboring Kermit have grown accustomed to the two giant sinkholes that sit between their small West Texas towns. But now radar images taken of the sinkholes by an orbiting space satellite reveal big changes may be on the horizon. A new study by geophysicists at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, finds the massive sinkholes are unstable, with the ground around them subsiding, suggesting the holes could pose a bigger hazard sometime in the future. The two sinkholes — about a mile apart — appear to be expanding. Additionally, areas around the existing sinkholes are unstable, with large areas of subsidence detected via satellite radar remote sensing. That leaves the possibility that new sinkholes, or one [...]

By | June 14th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Geohazard: Giant sinkholes near West Texas oil patch towns are growing — as new ones lurk

New research on Alamosaurus

Journal of Systematic Palaeontology Originally Posted: June 6, 2016 Ronald S. Tykoski and Anthony R. Fiorillo recently published new research titled, An articulated cervical series of Alamosaurus sanjuanensis Gilmore, 1922 (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from Texas: new perspective on the relationships of North America's last giant sauropod. READ MORE  

Matthew Siegler, Earth Sciences, What If The Moon Were Bigger?

GeorgiaWorld Originally Posted: May 25, 2016 The questions kids ask about science aren’t always easy to answer. Sometimes, their little brains can lead to big places adults forget to explore. With that in mind, we’ve started a new series called Science Question From a Toddler, which will use kids’ curiosity as a jumping-off point to investigate the scientific wonders that adults don’t even think to ask about. I want the toddlers in your life to be a part of it! Send me their science questions and they may serve as the inspiration for a column. And now, our toddler … Q: How big is the moon? What if it were bigger? — Hagen G., age 5 The first part of your question is easy-peasy. The moon has a circumference of 6,783.5 [...]

By | June 1st, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Matthew Siegler, Earth Sciences, What If The Moon Were Bigger?
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