The Tail of the Lion: 100 Years of General Relativity, the Scientific Theory of Space and Time

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Listen to Associate Professor of Physics, Stephen Sekula, as he commemorates one of the greatest scientific discoveries of modern times: Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity. This lecture is part of the SMU Godbey Lecture Series sponsored by the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute. For information on future events, visit: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events

Scientific literacy series returns with lecture on 100th anniversary of Einstein’s Theory of Relativity

SMU NEWS

DALLAS (SMU) – The Scientific Literacy Series at SMU kicked off last fall with discussions on why learning about science is important and how scientists can better communicate their findings to the public. This spring, the series returns with a lecture commemorating one of the greatest scientific discoveries of modern times: Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity.

“Without the Theory of General Relativity, GPS devices would be wrong every day by 11 kilometers more than the day before,” says SMU Associate Professor in Physics Stephen Sekula, who will deliver the lecture at 5:15 p.m. on Feb. 4 in the Meadows Museum’s Jones Hall.

“It’s an exciting time today, just as I’m sure it was 100 years ago when the physics of the day failed to explain the world,” Sekula adds. “We’re close to that point again, and that’s exciting.”

Sekula’s lecture is hosted by the Anniversary Series of the Godbey Lectures and the Scientific Literacy Series, which is sponsored by the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute (DCII).

“Having Stephen talk about Einstein seemed like a no-brainer, as Einstein is one of the most well-known scientists in the world,” says Caroline Brettell, SMU Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Ruth Collins Altshuler Director of the DCII. “People should understand how transformative his theory was at the time he discovered it.”

The event is free and open to the public, though space is limited. RSVP’s are requested at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/godbey-lecture-series-spring-2016-tickets-20759982667. READ MORE

Confucianism Then and Now

Event Date: Thursday February 25, 2016
Time: 5:15 p.m. Reception, 5:45 p.m. Lecture
Location: Meadows Museum, Jones Hall

Join SMU Professor and Chair of Religious Studies, Johan Elverskog as he continues the 2016 Spring Godbey Lecture Series. Please RSVP at https://godbey2016.eventbrite.com or 214-768-3527. For more information http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events

Representing the Self: From Literary Discourse to Visual Artifacts

Event Date: Friday, Febuary 12, 2016
Time: 4:30 p.m.
Location: Owen Fine Arts Center 1060

Dancygier photo[1]Join guest lecturer Barbara Dancygier of the University of British Columbia as she lectures on the self. For more information visit http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events.

Academic Publishing in the 21st Century: A Roundtable Discussion

Event date: Tuesday, February 9, 2016
Time: 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. with Refreshments
Location: McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall

Computer

How should you package and disseminate your ideas for widest readership and maximum impact? How are digital platforms and the Internet changing the nature of publishing? Join us for a roundtable discussion on the opportunities and the challenges of academic publishing in the 21st century. Please RSVP at http://publishingin21stcentury.eventbrite.com 214-768-3527. For more information visit http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events

The Tail of the Lion: 100 Years of General Relativity, the Scientific Theory of Space and Time

Event date: Thursday, February 4, 2016
Time: 5:15 p.m. Reception, 5:45 p.m. Lecture
Location: Meadows Museum, Jones Hall

SMU Associate Professor of Physics, Stephen Sekula, as he kicks off the 2016 Spring Godbey Lecture Series. Please RSVP at https://godbey2016.eventbrite.com or 214-768-3527
For more information visit http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events

Request for Proposals | Annual Fellows Seminar 2016-2017

Global Africa Seminar AY14-15The Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute is now soliciting proposals from faculty for an Annual Fellows Seminar for the 2016-2017 Academic Year.

 

For application details, please see link below.

http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Programs/AnnualFellowsSeminars

Deadline for submission is March 4, 2016.

 

Event: Is Forensic Science an Oxymoron?

Event date: December 7, 2015

Event time: 12:15 p.m.

Location: Heroy Hall 153

An Event with Jonathan Koehler, Professor of Law, Northwestern University

koehler_JJ_PicIn recent years, forensic scientists in some areas have been taken to task for over claiming, failing to test their assumptions, and neglecting to explain to judges and jurors how the risk of error affects the value of reported matches. Jurors also have some misconceptions about forensic science evidence and misunderstand the meaning of the statistics they hear in cases involving DNA evidence. Solutions will be explored.

Lunch Provided. RSVP at lawandstatistics.eventbrite.com

Contact for more information: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events

 

Beyond The Two Cultures: a lecture on data and unity

SMU Daily Campus

Originally Posted: November 19, 2015

Tucked away in one of the many lecture rooms inside Heroy Hall, full of professors but lacking in students, was a lecture presented by acclaimed scientist Roger Malina. The lecture was hosted by the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute on Nov. 18 at 4:30 p.m. and centered on the connection between art and science.

Malina, a physicist, astronomer and executive editor of the Leonardo publications at MIT Press, focuses on finding connections between the natural sciences and the arts, design, and humanities. He also has dual appointments as a professor of arts and technology and as a professor of physics at UT Dallas.

The lecture began with this question: Why are human beings so badly designed to understand nature and the universe? In other words, how can we work together to understand each other and the world we live in?

Such questions set the tone for the rest of the presentation, which focused on merging the world of the arts with the world of science. READ MORE