Better than Star Wars: Chemistry discovery yields 3-D table-top objects crafted from light

Phys.org Originally Posted: July 11, 2017 A scientist's dream of 3-D projections like those he saw years ago in a Star Wars movie has led to new technology for making animated 3-D table-top objects by structuring light. The new technology uses photoswitch molecules to bring to life 3-D light structures that are viewable from 360 degrees, says chemist Alexander Lippert, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, who led the research. The economical method for shaping light into an infinite number of volumetric objects would be useful in a variety of fields, from biomedical imaging, education and engineering, to TV, movies, video games and more. "Our idea was to use chemistry and special photoswitch molecules to make a 3-D display that delivers a 360-degree view," Lippert said. "It's not a [...]

By | 2017-07-11T10:00:56+00:00 July 11th, 2017|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Better than Star Wars: Chemistry discovery yields 3-D table-top objects crafted from light

Alex Lippert’s research uses chemistry to develop affordable, glowing internal imaging techniques

SMU News Originally Posted: June 15, 2017 SMU chemist Alex Lippert has received a prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER Award, expected to total $611,000 over five years, to fund his research into alternative internal imaging techniques. NSF CAREER Awards are given to tenure-track faculty members who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research in American colleges and universities. Lippert, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Science, is an organic chemist and adviser to four doctoral students and five undergraduates who assist in his research. Lippert’s team develops synthetic organic compounds that glow in reaction to certain conditions. For example, when injected into a mouse’s tumor, the [...]

By | 2017-06-28T09:16:24+00:00 June 28th, 2017|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Alex Lippert’s research uses chemistry to develop affordable, glowing internal imaging techniques

SMU chemist wins prestigious NSF Career Award

SMU Research Originally Posted: June 15, 2017 Alex Lippert’s research uses chemistry to develop affordable, glowing internal imaging techniques SMU chemist Alex Lippert has received a prestigious National Science Foundation Career Award, expected to total $611,000 over five years, to fund his research into alternative internal imaging techniques. NSF Career Awards are given to tenure-track faculty members who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research in American colleges and universities. Lippert, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, is an organic chemist and adviser to four doctoral students and five undergraduates who assist in his research. Lippert’s team develops synthetic organic compounds that glow in reaction [...]

By | 2017-06-16T06:39:11+00:00 June 16th, 2017|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU chemist wins prestigious NSF Career Award

Eighteen distinguished faculty members with a combined total of nearly 585 years of SMU service retired with emeritus status in the 2016-17 academic year.

SMU News Originally Posted: June 8, 2017 Eighteen distinguished faculty members with a combined total of nearly 585 years of SMU service retired with emeritus status in the 2016-17 academic year. The professors, and their dates of service: • Thomas E. Barry, Professor Emeritus of Marketing, Cox School of Business, 1970-2017 • Janis Bergman-Carton, Professor Emerita of Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, 1991-2017 • Edward Biehl, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1962-2017 • Gordon Birrell, Professor Emeritus of World Languages and Literatures, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1974-2017 • Dolores M. Etter, Professor Emerita of Electrical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, 2008-2016 • Richard F. Gunst, Professor Emeritus of Statistical Science, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1971-2017 • C. Michael Hawn, University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1992-2017 • Debora Hunter, Professor Emerita of Art, Meadows School of the Arts, [...]

By | 2017-06-15T09:40:41+00:00 June 15th, 2017|Anthropology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, English, History, Philosophy, Statistical Science, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on Eighteen distinguished faculty members with a combined total of nearly 585 years of SMU service retired with emeritus status in the 2016-17 academic year.

Researchers Decoded How Plants Tell Time Based On A Protein

Science Times Originally Posted: May 18, 2017 Clocks could tell time clearly while it isn’t known by the majority how plants tell time. Fortunately, a research team from Southern Methodist University have been studying for a long time already on how the greeneries tell time. According to Gizmodo, the scientists from the Southern Methodist University worked alongside a team from the University of Washington, Ohio State, and Japan. The overall research team then studied everything about a protein called Zeitlupe or ZTL and another protein called FKF1 to figure out how plants tell time. ZTL was then described to change its shape after being exposed to blue light after an hour or two. The published result of the study in the journal eLife was said to be [...]

By | 2017-05-19T08:15:41+00:00 May 19th, 2017|Chemistry, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Researchers Decoded How Plants Tell Time Based On A Protein

Study solves mystery of how plants use sunlight to tell time via cell protein signaling

SMU News Originally Posted: May 16, 2017 Discovery may someday allow farmers to grow crops in climates where they currently won’t grow and allows scientists to make a subtle, targeted mutation to a specific native plant protein Findings of a new study solve a key mystery about the chemistry of how plants tell time so they can flower and metabolize nutrients. The process — a subtle chemical event — takes place in the cells of every plant every second of every day. The new understanding means farmers may someday grow crops under conditions or in climates where they currently can’t grow, said chemist Brian D. Zoltowski, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, who led the study. “We now understand the chemistry allowing plants to maintain a natural 24-hour [...]

By | 2017-05-16T18:08:51+00:00 May 17th, 2017|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Study solves mystery of how plants use sunlight to tell time via cell protein signaling

In Memoriam of Dieter Cremer, Professor of Chemistry

Dieter Cremer, Professor of Chemistry, passed away on Thursday, April 13. Professor Cremer was a highly distinguished researcher in the field of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, where his extensive research ranged from the development of state-of-the-art relativistic methods and computer programs for the investigation of homogeneous and enzyme catalysis, the study of chemical bonding based on vibrational spectroscopy, protein structure and folding, to the analysis of environmental pollutants. Director of CATCO (the Computational and Theoretical Chemistry Group), Professor Cremer was also fundamental in the development of the new PhD program in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry at SMU, which will accept its first students this autumn. In 2012, he brought the international biannual Austin Symposium on Molecular Structure and Dynamics to SMU. Educated at the University [...]

By | 2017-04-19T07:26:17+00:00 April 19th, 2017|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on In Memoriam of Dieter Cremer, Professor of Chemistry

Dedman College senior Patricia Nance featured in SMU Magazine

SMU Magazine Originally Posted: Spring 2017 Dedman College senior Patricia Nance, a chemistry and math major, has been developing a new polymer for breast implants to reduce infections for women who get reconstructive surgery after breast cancer. For Nance, this research is personal and has a purpose: to benefit women like her grandmother. Read more of the Spring 2017 SMU Magazine cover story. READ MORE: http://blog.smu.edu/…/05/SMU-Magazine-Spring-Summer-2017.pdf *Patricia Nance is also a DCII Hamilton Scholar

By | 2017-02-13T09:58:17+00:00 February 13th, 2017|Chemistry, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Mathematics, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Dedman College senior Patricia Nance featured in SMU Magazine

SMU chemist discovers new way to crack the stubborn carbon-hydrogen bond that could allow industry to make petroleum-derived commercial products easier, cheaper and cleaner

Science Daily Originally Posted: January 4, 2017 A new catalyst for breaking the tough molecular bond between carbon and hydrogen holds the promise of a cleaner, easier and cheaper way to derive products from petroleum, says a researcher at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. "Some of the most useful building blocks we have in the world are simple, plentiful hydrocarbons like methane, which we extract from the ground. They can be used as starting materials for complex chemical products such as plastics and pharmaceuticals," said Isaac Garcia-Bosch, Harold A. Jeskey Endowed Chair assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at SMU. "But the first step of the process is very, very difficult -- breaking that carbon-hydrogen bond. The stronger the bond, the more difficult it is [...]

By | 2017-01-05T07:56:20+00:00 January 5th, 2017|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU chemist discovers new way to crack the stubborn carbon-hydrogen bond that could allow industry to make petroleum-derived commercial products easier, cheaper and cleaner

Dedman College alumna Avery Acker ’16 chose SMU for its academic rigor, so she could pursue her dream of becoming a doctor

SMU Avery Acker ’16 was the Academic All-American of the Year for all of Division I volleyball. She chose SMU for its academic rigor, so she could pursue her dream of becoming a doctor. “I grew up in a very small town, and I just loved it. We hunted, we fished and we played every sport imaginable because there was really nothing else to do,”
recalls Acker. At a young age she developed a passion for playing volleyball and an interest in pursuing a career in medicine. She knew SMU was the right school for her when volleyball coach Lisa Seifert showed the same passion and commitment to success on the court and in the classroom. At SMU, Acker discovered the benefits of SMU’s Altshuler Learning [...]

By | 2016-11-17T20:49:33+00:00 November 20th, 2016|Biology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on Dedman College alumna Avery Acker ’16 chose SMU for its academic rigor, so she could pursue her dream of becoming a doctor
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