Where Dallas’ Oldest History Goes to Die

D Magazine Originally Posted: December 2017 issue Dr. Sunday Eiselt—a field archaeologist, SMU professor, and former Marine—has a friendly disposition and long hair that falls to her waist. I went to meet her last summer on campus because she’d discovered something that I’d spent weeks searching for, something that had been missing for decades. Inside Heroy Science Hall, I waited for her in the lobby and passed time by looking at various geologic displays and worn, oversize photographs of digs in Egypt. When she arrived, we made introductions and headed downstairs to the basement floor. As we began the descent, she turned and said, “We won’t be looking at any human remains today. I can show you artifacts, but no humans.” She said this cordially [...]

By | 2017-12-05T10:49:55+00:00 December 5th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Where Dallas’ Oldest History Goes to Die

SMU senior Benjamin H. Chi named Schwarzman Scholar

SMU News Originally Posted: December 4, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) — SMU senior Benjamin H. Chi was named a 2019 Schwarzman Scholar, one of 140 students selected globally to receive the honor. Schwarzman Scholars are selected based on their academic aptitude, intellectual ability, leadership potential, entrepreneurial spirit, ability to anticipate and act on emerging trends and opportunities, exemplary character, and desire to understand other cultures, perspectives and positions. A biochemistry, health and society major, Chi has conducted several research projects during his time at SMU. He conducted stem cell research to treat age-related macular degeneration, designed and conducted an independent research project on the healthcare literacy and access of at-risk Nong Zhuan Fei migrants, and studied cell lines’ growth rates to determine the link between genetics [...]

By | 2017-12-08T06:53:22+00:00 December 4th, 2017|Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, UHP|Comments Off on SMU senior Benjamin H. Chi named Schwarzman Scholar

Congratulations to Anthropology Ph.D. Candidate Rachel Burger, Recently Awarded a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Award

Department of Anthropology Facebook Page Originally Posted: November 15, 2017 "Rachel’s research examines the affects of population aggregation on food acquisition behavior. Food security, the availability of and access to safe and healthy food, is a key question in global social theory and a primary concern for developing nations. As the world's population increases, longitudinal data is necessary to understand how best to measure food insecurity in modern communities and to predict, prepare for, and respond to future trends in food availability and access as the environment changes. Archaeology is perfectly poised to examine how communities in the past collectively managed crucial animal protein resources and how such practices can lead to food sovereignty (the democratic production and distribution of food) and enduring traditions over time. [...]

By | 2017-11-15T18:15:54+00:00 November 15th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Congratulations to Anthropology Ph.D. Candidate Rachel Burger, Recently Awarded a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Award

Prestigious Academy welcomes SMU anthropologist

SMU Magazine Originally Posted: November 1, 2017 SMU anthropologist Caroline Brettell celebrated her election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences during a ceremony at the Academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts on October 7. The 228 new fellows and foreign honorary members — representing the sciences, the humanities and the arts, business, public affairs and the nonprofit sector — were announced in April as members of one of the world’s most prestigious honorary societies. In addition to Brettell, the class of 2017 includes actress Carol Burnett, musician John Legend, playwright Lynn Nottage, immunologist James Allison and many others. Brettell is the fourth SMU faculty member to be elected to the Academy. She joins David Meltzer, Henderson-Morrison Professor of Prehistory in Dedman College (class of 2013), Scurlock University Professor of Human Values Charles Curran (class of 2010), [...]

By | 2017-11-10T10:50:20+00:00 November 14th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Prestigious Academy welcomes SMU anthropologist

An ancient city has been discovered in the middle of the ocean

MSN News Originally Posted: October 31, 2017 Ancient ruins in the middle of the Pacific ocean could be the remenants of a legendary race or dare we say....Atlantis.  Clips from the Science Channel series What on Earth? reveal images of a mysterious location just off the coast of the tiny nation of Micronesia. The remote island of Pohnpei is home to the archaeological site of Nan Madol, yet very little is known about the area and the ruins that reside there. The city appears to be sit on top of a lagoon and consists of a series of canals and large stone walls. Studies published by Research Gate show that the complex could date back to the first or second century AD but little has still yet [...]

By | 2017-11-06T17:46:58+00:00 November 6th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on An ancient city has been discovered in the middle of the ocean

Ancient Hunter Gatherers Created Networks to Minimize Inbreeding

Dallas Innovates Originally Posted: October 26, 2017 At least 34,000 years ago, human hunter-gatherer groups minimized inbreeding by developing sophisticated social and mating networks. David Meltzer That’s according to a new study conducted by an international team of academics that included Southern Methodist University archaeologist David Meltzer. The team was led by the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. Meltzer’s expertise includes the First People in the Americas, according to SMU. He is Henderson-Morrison Professor of Prehistory in SMU’s Department of Anthropology in Dedman College. The study sequenced the genomes of individuals found at an ancient burial site in Russia. The team discovered that individuals were, at most, first cousins, which showed that they had developed sexual partnerships [...]

By | 2017-10-30T08:33:57+00:00 October 27th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Ancient Hunter Gatherers Created Networks to Minimize Inbreeding

A composite window into human history

SMU Research Originally Posted: October 3, 2017 Better integration of ancient DNA studies with archaeology promises deeper insights. DNA testing alone of ancient human remains can’t resolve questions about past societies. It’s time for geneticists and archaeologists to collaborate more fully in the face of ever greater advancements in ancient DNA research, according to SMU archaeologist David J. Meltzer and his colleagues in a recent article in the scientific journal Science. The authors write in “A composite window into human history” that over the past decade, DNA testing of ancient human remains has become a valuable tool for studying and understanding past human population histories. Most notably, for example, is how sequencing of ancient genomes resolved the dispute over our species’ evolutionary relationship with Neanderthals, the authors point [...]

By | 2017-10-12T11:33:50+00:00 October 12th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on A composite window into human history

Prehistoric humans formed complex mating networks to avoid inbreeding

SMU Research Originally Posted: October 10, 2017 A new study has sequenced the genomes of individuals from an ancient burial site in Russia and discovered that they were, at most, first cousins, indicating that they had developed sexual partnerships beyond their immediate social and family group. A new study has identified when humans transitioned from simple systems designed to minimize inbreeding to more complex ones suitable for hunter-gatherer societies. The study findings are reported in the journal Science and demonstrate that, by at least 34,000 years ago, human hunter-gatherer groups had developed sophisticated social and mating networks that minimized inbreeding. The study examined genetic information from the remains of modern humans who lived during the early part of the Upper Palaeolithic, a period when modern humans from [...]

By | 2017-10-11T07:50:16+00:00 October 11th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Prehistoric humans formed complex mating networks to avoid inbreeding

Congratulations to SMU Anthropologist Caroline Brettell inducted to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on Oct. 7

SMU News Originally Posted: October 6, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) — Noted SMU anthropologist Caroline Brettell will be inducted as a fellow into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences during a ceremony on Saturday, Oct. 7, at the Academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, Mass. Brettell joins 228 new fellows and foreign honorary members — representing the sciences, the humanities and the arts, business, public affairs and the nonprofit sector — as a member of one of the world’s most prestigious honorary societies. “Caroline Brettell is an internationally recognized leader in the field of migration, and one of Dedman College’s most productive scholars,” said Thomas DiPiero, dean of SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. “I couldn’t be happier to see her win this well-deserved accolade.” “I am surprised and deeply honored to receive [...]

By | 2017-10-07T09:53:21+00:00 October 7th, 2017|Anthropology, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congratulations to SMU Anthropologist Caroline Brettell inducted to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on Oct. 7

Congrats! Dedman College alumna Katie Logsdon and Dr. Smith-Morris, Anthropology, published in Midwifery Journal

Originally Posted: September 22, 2017 "As an undergraduate at SMU, I knew many opportunities existed for me to conduct research... Dr. Smith-Morris immediately encouraged me in my ideas and refined my research."-Katie Logsdon, #DedmanCollege '17, whose manuscript on her undergraduate research in Amsterdam with the SMU Department of Anthropology's Dr. Smith-Morris was published in the October edition of Midwifery Journal. Congratulations on this accomplishment, Katie! Read her research here: http://ow.ly/FWe030fkshV

By | 2017-09-22T10:53:22+00:00 September 22nd, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congrats! Dedman College alumna Katie Logsdon and Dr. Smith-Morris, Anthropology, published in Midwifery Journal
Load More Posts