Eighteen distinguished faculty members with a combined total of nearly 585 years of SMU service retired with emeritus status in the 2016-17 academic year.

SMU News Originally Posted: June 8, 2017 Eighteen distinguished faculty members with a combined total of nearly 585 years of SMU service retired with emeritus status in the 2016-17 academic year. The professors, and their dates of service: • Thomas E. Barry, Professor Emeritus of Marketing, Cox School of Business, 1970-2017 • Janis Bergman-Carton, Professor Emerita of Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, 1991-2017 • Edward Biehl, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1962-2017 • Gordon Birrell, Professor Emeritus of World Languages and Literatures, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1974-2017 • Dolores M. Etter, Professor Emerita of Electrical Engineering, Lyle School of Engineering, 2008-2016 • Richard F. Gunst, Professor Emeritus of Statistical Science, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1971-2017 • C. Michael Hawn, University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, 1992-2017 • Debora Hunter, Professor Emerita of Art, Meadows School of the Arts, [...]

By | 2017-06-15T09:40:41+00:00 June 15th, 2017|Anthropology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, English, History, Philosophy, Statistical Science, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on Eighteen distinguished faculty members with a combined total of nearly 585 years of SMU service retired with emeritus status in the 2016-17 academic year.

Ron Wetherington, Anthropology, Texas education board to consider compromise on evolution standards

Texas Tribune Originally Posted: April 17 This week's State Board of Education debate about high school biology standards and governing how to teach students about the theory of evolution could come down to a single word: evaluate. At a February meeting, board members took a preliminary vote to modify those curriculum standards, keeping in language that would require students to challenge evolutionary science. Republican board member Barbara Cargill, who led the charge to keep in the controversial language, has said requiring students to "evaluate" certain biological processes is necessary for thorough biology instruction. Critics say keeping the word "evaluate" in those standards casts doubt on evolution in a way that could open the door to teaching creationism. The board is set to hold that debate Tuesday and will take another [...]

By | 2017-04-25T07:06:49+00:00 April 25th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Ron Wetherington, Anthropology, Texas education board to consider compromise on evolution standards

Anthropologist Caroline Brettell elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

SMU News Originally Posted: April 18, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) — Noted SMU anthropologist Caroline Brettell joins actress Carol Burnett, musician John Legend, playwright Lynn Nottage, immunologist James Allison and other renowned leaders in various fields as a newly elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The class of 2017 will be inducted at a ceremony on Saturday, Oct. 7 at the Academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Brettell joins 228 new fellows and foreign honorary members — representing the sciences, the humanities and the arts, business, public affairs and the nonprofit sector — as a member of one of the world’s most prestigious honorary societies. “Caroline Brettell is an internationally recognized leader in the field of migration, and one of Dedman College’s most productive scholars,” said Thomas DiPiero, dean of SMU’s Dedman [...]

By | 2017-04-18T11:53:07+00:00 April 18th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Anthropologist Caroline Brettell elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Congratulations Caroline Brettell, Anthropology, Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

American Academy of Arts and Sciences Originally Posted: April 12, 2017 American Academy of Arts and Sciences Elects 228 National and International Scholars, Artists, Philanthropists, and Business Leaders The 237th class of members includes philanthropist and singer-songwriter John Legend, award-winning actress Carol Burnett, chairman of the board of Xerox Corporation Ursula Burns, mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani, immunologist James P. Allison, and writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Press Release CAMBRIDGE, MA | APRIL 12, 2017 — The American Academy of Arts and Sciences today announced the election of 228 new members. They include some of the world’s most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists, as well as civic, business, and philanthropic leaders. The list of the 237th class of new members is available at www.amacad.org/members. Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts [...]

By | 2017-04-12T07:31:34+00:00 April 12th, 2017|Anthropology, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congratulations Caroline Brettell, Anthropology, Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Archaeologist explains innovation of ‘fluting’ ancient stone weaponry

Phys.org Originally Posted: April 6, 2017 Approximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years. Kent State University's Metin Eren, Ph.D., director of archaeology and assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences, and his colleagues are not only asking these questions but testing their unique new theories. They want to better understand the engineering, techniques and purposes of Clovis weapon technologies. Specifically, they study stone projectile points, such as arrowheads and spear points, [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:20:09+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Archaeologist explains innovation of ‘fluting’ ancient stone weaponry

Meet the 10 People Protecting Dallas’ Natural Gifts

DMagazine Originally Posted: March, 2017 These conservationists are on the front lines of a battle to save the Trinity River landscape. Tim Dalbey An archaeologist and paleontologist, Dalbey has studied the Great Trinity Forest for more than two decades. Of particular interest is the area around Big Spring. Dalbey, who earned his doctorate from SMU, is known as the man to talk to when it comes to the Native American tribes (the Caddo, among them) that settled there as early as 11,000 years ago. Bill Holston Holston, the executive director of the Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, is probably better recognized for his hobby: hiking across North Texas on weekend mornings, usually with a group of fellow master naturalists often on the banks of [...]

By | 2017-02-24T09:38:27+00:00 February 24th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Meet the 10 People Protecting Dallas’ Natural Gifts

Determined to live a life of significance

SMU News Originally Posted: December 13, 2016 After surviving two childhood liver transplants, followed by years of related medical complications, SMU senior Libby Arterburn is determined to live a life of significance. She will graduate from SMU Dec. 17 with degrees in health and society, psychology and a minor in biology, which she intends to apply toward a medical career. Arterburn was diagnosed at age six weeks with antitrypsin deficiency disorder, a rare genetic condition in which the body does not make enough of a protein that protects the liver and lungs from damage. By the time she was four, she required a life-saving liver transplant. Complications led to a second transplant two days later. Since then, Arterburn has endured regular liver biopsies, multiple hospitalizations [...]

By | 2016-12-14T13:25:04+00:00 December 16th, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Psychology|Comments Off on Determined to live a life of significance

Archaeologist Mark McCoy: Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

SMU Research Originally Posted: October 18, 2016 New analysis of chief’s tomb suggests island’s monumental structures are earliest evidence of chiefdom in Pacific — yielding new keys to how societies emerge and evolve New dating on the stone buildings of Nan Madol suggests the ancient coral reef capital in the Pacific Ocean was the earliest among the islands to be ruled by a single chief. The discovery makes Nan Madol a key locale for studying how ancient human societies evolved from simple societies to more complex societies, said archaeologist Mark D. McCoy, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. McCoy led the discovery team. The finding was uncovered as part of a National Geographic expedition to study the monumental tomb said to belong to the first chief of the [...]

By | 2016-10-18T10:17:23+00:00 October 18th, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Archaeologist Mark McCoy: Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

“Gender Migration” by Dr. Caroline Brettell, Ruth Collins Altshuler Prof of Anthropology, director of the Interdisciplinary Institute

SMU Research Originally Posted: October 13, 2016 Gender roles, relations, and ideologies are major aspects of migration. In a timely book on the subject, SMU anthropologist Caroline B. Brettell argues that understanding gender relations is vital to a full and more nuanced explanation of both the causes and the consequences of migration, in the past and at present. Gender and Migration (Polity, 2016) explores gendered labor markets, laws and policies, and the transnational model of migration. With that, Brettell tackles a variety of issues such as how gender shapes the roles that men and women play in the construction of immigrant family and community life, debates concerning transnational motherhood, and how gender structures the immigrant experience for men and women more broadly. “I have been [...]

By | 2016-10-17T10:26:58+00:00 October 17th, 2016|Anthropology, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on “Gender Migration” by Dr. Caroline Brettell, Ruth Collins Altshuler Prof of Anthropology, director of the Interdisciplinary Institute

Archaeologist Meltzer Discusses First People in New World

Hamilton College News Originally Posted: October 5, 2016 Students and faculty nearly filled the Kennedy Auditorium to hear Southern Methodist  University  anthropology professor and archaeologist David J. Meltzer give a talk titled, “The Pleistocene Peopling of the Americas: What We Know, Don’t Know and Argue About Endlessly.”  Morris, the Morris Fellow Visiting Speaker lectured on Oct. 4. With insight, clarity and even some humor, Meltzer discussed issues surrounding the people of the Americas, drawing on both archaeological and genetic data to guide the audience through competing theories meant to answer persistent ruminations about Pleistocene people. Early in the lecture, he posed a few questions, including but not limited to: “Who were the first Americans?” and “Where did they come from?” Initially, archaeologists were skeptical that [...]

By | 2016-10-10T11:55:41+00:00 October 10th, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Archaeologist Meltzer Discusses First People in New World
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