Ruth Altshuler‘s legacy will continue through the lives changed by her leadership, kindness and generosity.

SMU News Originally Posted: December 10, 2017 DALLAS (SMU) - Renowned civic and philanthropic leader Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler died Dec. 8, 2017, leaving a legacy of leadership, friendship and generosity focused on institutions dedicated to improving lives. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 14 at Highland Park United Methodist Church, followed by a reception in the Martha Proctor Mack Ballroom in Umphrey Lee Center, 3300 Dyer, on the SMU campus. The family asks that instead of flowers, donations be made in her honor to the Salvation Army. Ruth Altshuler (center) with SMU Vice President Brad E. Cheves (left) and SMU President R. Gerald Turner As a leader she was known for her intelligence, decisiveness, legendary fundraising skills and sense of [...]

By | 2017-12-11T08:32:08+00:00 December 11th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on Ruth Altshuler‘s legacy will continue through the lives changed by her leadership, kindness and generosity.

Various opinions from SMU professors

SMU News Originally Posted: December 7, 2017 Following are links to a sample of opinions written by SMU professors that have appeared recently in various publications. They represent the independent thoughts of their authors and appear in the order in which they were published, the most recent being at the top. READ MORE Trump should try quiet diplomacy By Jeffrey Engel Director of the SMU Center for Presidential History at SMU Twenty-five years ago this week, Americans rejected a far different man than the one in power today. Self-confident where Donald Trump is thin-skinned, well-mannered in a way Trump considers weak, George H.W. Bush is remembered a quarter-century out of office as an elder statesman whose call for a “kinder and gentler” nation appears quaint [...]

By | 2017-12-08T06:22:30+00:00 December 11th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Various opinions from SMU professors

Cullum Clark, Economics, charities hold breath as lawmakers work on tax reform

Fox 4 Originally Posted: December 7, 2017 Charities are holding their breath as lawmakers hammer out details of a massive overhaul to the taxcode Some organizations are fearful the changes could equal a drop in charitable giving. “The last couple of weeks of the year our donations go way up,” said Jonathan Rich, Salvation Army. “In fact the last quarter of each calendar year we see more donations, about 50 percent of our donations come in the last quarter alone.” The most visible fundraiser is the Salvation Army’s Red Kettle Campaign, but they are also reliant on major gifts. “When someone like you or me decides to give a thousand dollars to a charity, that’s a major gift and we get to write it off [...]

By | 2017-12-12T08:23:27+00:00 December 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Cullum Clark, Economics, charities hold breath as lawmakers work on tax reform

Will the Republican tax bill work?

SMUVideo Published on Dec 7, 2017 Professor Jeffrey Engel, director of SMU’s Center for Presidential History, talks about President Trump and the tax reform legislation now making its way through Congress with Fox 4, the local Fox network affiliate. Watch https://youtu.be/Ak-aCsfH8mk  

By | 2017-12-08T06:30:27+00:00 December 8th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, History, Political Science|Comments Off on Will the Republican tax bill work?

Research: SMU-led fossil study finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

SMU Forum Originally Posted: December 7, 2017 Fossil leaves from Africa have resolved a prehistoric climate puzzle — and also confirm the link between carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global warming. Research until now has produced a variety of results and conflicting data that have cast doubt on the link between high carbon dioxide levels and climate change for a time interval about 22 million years ago. But a new study has found the link does indeed exist for that prehistoric time period, say SMU researchers. The finding will help scientists understand how recent and future increases in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide may impact the future of our planet, they add. The discovery comes from new biochemical analyses of fossil leaves from [...]

By | 2017-12-08T06:16:54+00:00 December 8th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Research: SMU-led fossil study finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

Community change agent Kovan Barzani ’17

SMU Magazine Originally Posted: December Issue As the son of refugees, Kovan Barzani ’17 wanted to make the most of his University experience. While a triple major at SMU, he managed a Texas House campaign, started a program to teach refugees job skills and turned a finance internship into a full-time job. “My mother didn’t know how to read,” says Barzani. War kept her from completing elementary school, and eventually Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s brutal regime forced Barzani’s parents to flee for a new life in the United States. In middle school, Barzani helped his mother learn English and pass her U.S. citizenship test. By the time he graduated from high school, he had scholarship offers from three schools. He says, “When I realized there [...]

By | 2017-12-06T08:53:25+00:00 December 6th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Political Science, Tower Center, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Community change agent Kovan Barzani ’17

George Holden, Psychology, spanking children can lead to relationship violence later, according to a recent study

Fox 4 Originally Posted: December 5, 2017 Parents who believe in “spare the rod, spoil the child” might be setting their children up to become violent toward future partners, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of Pediatrics. “We asked 758 kids between 19 and 20 years old how often they had been spanked, slapped or struck with an object as form of punishment when they were younger,” said the study’s lead author, Jeff Temple, an associate professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “Kids who said they had experienced corporal punishment were more likely to have recently committed dating violence.” This result, he said, held up even when contributing factors such as sex, age, parental education, ethnicity and childhood abuse were [...]

By | 2017-12-12T08:19:59+00:00 December 6th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on George Holden, Psychology, spanking children can lead to relationship violence later, according to a recent study

Where Dallas’ Oldest History Goes to Die

D Magazine Originally Posted: December 2017 issue Dr. Sunday Eiselt—a field archaeologist, SMU professor, and former Marine—has a friendly disposition and long hair that falls to her waist. I went to meet her last summer on campus because she’d discovered something that I’d spent weeks searching for, something that had been missing for decades. Inside Heroy Science Hall, I waited for her in the lobby and passed time by looking at various geologic displays and worn, oversize photographs of digs in Egypt. When she arrived, we made introductions and headed downstairs to the basement floor. As we began the descent, she turned and said, “We won’t be looking at any human remains today. I can show you artifacts, but no humans.” She said this cordially [...]

By | 2017-12-05T10:49:55+00:00 December 5th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Where Dallas’ Oldest History Goes to Die

History Professor Op-Ed in New York Times: George McGovern, Vietnam and the Democratic Crackup

New York Times Originally Posted: December: 5, 2017 On Sept. 24, 1963, George McGovern, the junior senator from South Dakota, addressed a full chamber on America’s growing entanglement in Southeast Asia. His words rang like a fire bell in the night. “The current dilemma in Vietnam is a clear demonstration of the limitations of military power,” the 41-year-old Democrat declared, just before the vote on a record-breaking defense appropriation. “There in the jungles of Asia, our mighty nuclear arsenal, our $50 billion arms budget, and our costly ‘special forces’ have proved powerless to cope with a ragged band of illiterate guerrillas fighting with homemade weapons.” Even worse, in Saigon, American resources were being used “to suppress the very liberties we went in to defend,” he [...]

By | 2017-12-05T08:25:36+00:00 December 5th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on History Professor Op-Ed in New York Times: George McGovern, Vietnam and the Democratic Crackup
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