News

Congrats to senior Bryson DeChambeau as he advanced to the U.S. Amateur final

New York Times

Originally Posted: August 22, 2015

OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. — SMU senior Bryson DeChambeau advanced to the U.S. Amateur final, putting him a victory away from becoming the fifth player to win the tournament and NCAA individual title in the same year.

DeChambeau, from Clovis, California, beat Southern California sophomore Sean Crocker 4 and 3 in the semifinals Saturday at Olympia Fields. He will face Virginia junior Derek Bard of New Hartford, New York, in the 36-hole final Sunday. Bard topped Japan’s Kenta Konishi 3 and 2.

“It’ll be a fun battle,” DeChambeau said. “If I can stay in the moment, I’ll be all right.”

Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996) and Ryan Moore (2004) are the only players to sweep the NCAA and Amateur titles in a season. READ MORE

George Holden, Psychology, how does it affect parents to spank their own children?

GeekDad

Originally Posted: August 24, 2015

My Kids Don’t Remember Being Spanked, But I Can’t Forget

I grew up in a house that spanked. Such punishment was usually reserved for the strongest of offenses–deliberate disregard for household property, or, more often, when my brother or I used force on each other. I don’t distinctly recall who dished out the punishment, but I do remember that, while my father occasionally threatened “the belt” (though it was never delivered), it was my mother who transformed the wooden spoons into instruments of terror. One favorite family story is how she went to change my bedding one day and found all of the wooden spoons lined up neatly under my mattress; we never figured out what I had done wrong, but I had clearly been worried about being punished for something. READ MORE

Cal Jillson, Political Science, on Hillary Clinton e-mails

Christian Science Monitor

Originally Posted: August 14, 2015

Was former Secretary of State Clinton sending or receiving classified information via unsecured e-mails? (So far, the only classified information found in a handful of Clinton e-mails may have been labeled as such after the fact. And it was information received, not sent.)

Why did she hand her private e-mail server and a thumb drive over to the FBI this week after months of resisting? (Likely because the pressure to do so was never going to end.) READ MORE

Remembering A Texan’s Role In Ending World War II

KERA News

Originally Posted: August 17, 2015

This month marks the 70th anniversary of the bombing of Japan. Two atomic bombs named ‘Little Boy’ and ‘Fat Man’ were dropped on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 in an effort to end World War II. A Texan, Major James Hopkins, piloted one of the planes on the Nagasaki mission.

His son, SMU Professor Emeritus Jim Hopkins, joined KERA’s Justin Martin to talk about his father. LISTEN HERE

Steve Hilts, Philosophy, The Ethical Consumer

KERA, Think

Originally Posted: August 20, 2015

Many of our everyday purchases are made without giving much thought to the businesses we’re supporting. Yet the more we know about how a company operates – and even the political leanings of its C.E.O. – the more those purchases also become ethical decisions. This hour, we’ll talk about how what we know about businesses affects how we spend our money with a panel of business ethics professors. Be sure to check out this recent New York Times story about the dynamics of Amazon, the inspiration for today’s conversation. LISTEN

Jeffrey Engel, Hillary Clinton prods rivals on student debt

New York Times

Originally Posted: August 13, 2015

When Hillary Rodham Clinton unveiled her plan this week to make higher education more affordable, Senator Marco Rubio of Florida promptly dismissed it as “Obamacare for college.” Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor, asserted that she would burden taxpayers by throwing more federal money at the problem.

But despite early criticism from rivals and pointed questions about the political feasibility of her proposal, Mrs. Clinton’s ambitious, expansive $350 billion plan to reduce debt in higher education has opened a new front in the presidential campaign. It has put pressure on her opponents as she has made a centerpiece of her agenda an issue that resonates across classes, party lines and generations. Read More

Dinosaur-hunting: A Famous Fossil Safari

Dallas Zoo

Originally Posted: August 14, 2015

Just east of Matlock Road in Mansfield, Texas, a small, seemingly unremarkable plot of land overlooks a new shopping center. Graded for construction, the upturned earth impregnated with shale and red clay resembles so many other future building sites across the booming Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex.

Yet this spring, this was the epicenter of a remarkable tale: a rare, 96-million-year-old dinosaur discovery by 5-year-old Wylie Brys and his father, Dallas Zoo employee Tim Brys.

Wylie and Tim suddenly found themselves thrust into the international spotlight: “Texas boy discovers dinosaur bones,” “Not Your Typical Sandbox Find!” and “Jurassic Jackpot,” the headlines shouted, with reports running on hundreds of media outlets, including the BBC, Huffington Post, Washington Post, Associated Press, U.S. News & World Report, and Time. More than 6.5 million people across the country watched accounts of the father-and-son team. ABC World News Tonight Anchor David Muir even introduced Wylie as the “Jurassic kid.” READ MORE