News

SMU physicist Govinda Dhungana and Dr. Bob Kehoe discuss nearby massive Supernova 2013ej explosion

SMU Research

Originally Posted: April 26, 2016

A giant star that exploded 30 million years ago in a galaxy near Earth had a radius prior to going supernova that was 200 times larger than our sun, according to astrophysicists at Southern Methodist University, Dallas.

The sudden blast hurled material outward from the star at a speed of 10,000 kilometers a second. That’s equivalent to 36 million kilometers an hour or 22.4 million miles an hour, said SMU physicist Govinda Dhungana, lead author on the new analysis. READ MORE

 

International Symposium on Violence in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands a Success

April 27, 2016

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Panel: Alfredo Corchado, DMN; Alan Knight, Oxford; Joaquin Rivaya-Martinez, Texas State University; Gerardo Gurza, Instituto Mora; Brandon Morgan, New Mexico Community College

Dallas, TX – SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies, in partnership with the Instituto Mora of Mexico City, hosted a public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border on Saturday, April 16, at the Latino Cultural Center in Dallas.

Bringing together scholars and journalists from Mexico, the United States and Great Britain, the international forum focused on the long evolution of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border, from the role of the state in borderland violence, drugs and smuggling, to refugees, migrants and mob violence. Over 200 people attended the afternoon conference featuring panel discussions centered on the evolution of violence along the border from the 1800s to the modern drug wars.

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Sherry Smith welcomes and introduces symposium

“Because of the modern drug wars, the border today has an enduring reputation as a site of brutal violence,” noted Andrew J. Torget, a professor of history at the University of North Texas and one of the organizers of the event. “But what people tend to forget is that border violence has changed dramatically during the past two centuries, and there is nothing inevitable about today’s situation. This public event will present historical background for the modern situation, as we discuss how border violence has evolved over time.”

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Group photo of presenters on the steps of Dallas Hall

Sponsored by the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at SMU in partnership with Instituto Mora of Mexico City, and with support from SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program and the Latino Cultural Center, a division of the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs.

LEARN MORE: The official program brochure with presenter names and affiliations. HERE

Watch the public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border.

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Part 2: 
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Part 3:
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Pia Orrenius, Tower Center, Immigration is good for the economy

Texas Standard

Originally Posted: April 25, 2016

It’s hard to talk about the issue of immigration without getting mired into the politics or the rhetoric of the hour. But hard data is often missing from the conversation. Is there a way to understand immigration through the lens of economic data? Perhaps there is.
Pia Orrenius is the Vice President and Senior Economist at the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank, and a fellow at the John Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University. She says there’s no need for alarm, despite the fearmongering – immigration is actually good for the economy.

“We know that when immigrants come into the economy, there’s a lot of good effects that follow from that,” Orrenius says. “It’s a larger labor supply, which means that the economy produces more output.”
That benefit is passed on to consumers, who see cheaper goods and services. READ MORE

Leading Lady: Jenny Torres, Interim President of SMU’s Multicultural Greek Council

HC at SMU

Originally Posted: April 23, 2016

SMU is proud to be home to world changers, and it all starts with the moment a student decides to become a leader. We are proud here at Her Campus to present SMU’s Leading Ladies, taking charge and making a difference in the community.

This week, we got to know senior Jenny Torres, a human rights and public policy student who is also the interim president of the Multicultural Greek Council. Recently, she was honored with two Hilltop Excellence Awards: the Emme V. Baine Legacy and A. Kenneth Pye Outstanding Greek Leader Awards. Receiving two honors in one night is fitting for a woman who seems to do everything at once. READ MORE

Epinephrine, a Positive and Negative Effector of Stress and Stress-Induced Illness

Event date: May 2
Time: 3:30 p.m.

Join Dona Lee Wong, Ph.D. of Harvard Medical School for a special guest lecture on her work. This event is sponsored by the DCII’s Biopsychosocial Research Cluster and the Center for Drug Discovery, Design and Delivery (CD4).

For more information: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events

 

Inaugural Faculty Book Fest!

Event date: May 3, 2016
Time: 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Remarks at 2:30 p.m.
Location: Dallas Hall Rotunda

This is books scramble. Many books to scatter under sky.

Take a break on Reading Day and join us to celebrate all books published by SMU faculty members in 2015. Refreshments and raffle prizes will be provided! RSVP at smubookfest.eventbrite.com or 214-768-3527.

 

Dedman College student Diana Cates shares her inspirational story

Sophomore Diana Cates delivered a heartfelt speech about her road to SMU and desire to serve. She was featured during SMU’s Campaign Finale and Founders’ Day Weekend Celebration.

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SMU ‘Power Plays’ conference April 25-26

SMU NEWS

Originally Posted: April 22, 2016

DALLAS (SMU) – SMU’s renowned Geothermal Lab will host its eighth international energy conference April 25-26 on the Dallas campus, focused on using the oilfield as a base for alternative energy production through the capture of waste heat and fluids.

In addition to oil and gas field geothermal projects, experts will discuss coal plant conversion for geothermal production, the intersection of geothermal energy and desalination, and large-scale direct use of the energy source produced by the internal heat of the earth.

“Power Plays: Geothermal Energy in Oil and Gas Fields” begins with an opening reception and poster session from 5:30 – 8 pm Monday, April 25, followed by a daylong program of speakers and presentations Tuesday, April 26. Conference details are available here. Walk-up registration is available at the conference site, the Collins Center at 3150 Binkley Avenue, Dallas, 75205.

The technology that is the primary focus of the conference takes advantage of an existing resource frequently considered a nuisance – wastewater produced by oil and gas wells during extraction. As a well ages it will typically produce more water and less oil or gas over time, which raises the cost of production. Where the produced wastewater is hot enough, and the water flow rate is sufficient, specially designed turbines can draw geothermal energy from the wastewater.

That “bonus” geothermal energy can be used to either generate electricity to operate the oil field equipment and lower the cost of production, sell the electricity directly to the power grid or – more likely – to nearby industry users seeking a highly secure electrical source. READ MORE

The Department of Economics will host conference April 29 and 30 in honor of Professor Shlomo Weber

 

Shlomo Weber, Dedman Economics Faculty
Shlomo Weber, Dedman Economics Faculty

The Department of Economics will host a conference in honor of Professor Shlomo Weber to recognize his contributions to economics research and to the lives of the many collaborators and colleagues he has worked with throughout his academic career. The one and a half day conference will begin at 1:30pm on Friday, April 29th and concluding at 5pm on Saturday, April 30th.

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During the conference, the 2007 Nobel Laureate, Eric Stark Maskin from Harvard University will speak about “Elections and Strategic Voting: Condorcet and Borda.” Professor Maskin is an American economist recognized with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger Myerson “for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory.” Maskin’s lecture will be on Saturday, April 30 from 10:30-11:30 in Dedman Life Sciences Building, room 131.

In addition to Professor Maskin, the following is the list of distinguished invited speakers for the conference:

  • Michael Alexeev (Indiana University)
  • Alberto Bisin (New York University)
  • Rajat Deb (Southern Methodist University)
  • Klaus Desmet (Southern Methodist University)
  • Paul Dower (Florida International University)
  • Joan Esteban (Institut d’Analisi Economica (CSIC) and Barcelona GSE)
  • Piero Gottardi (University of Venice and European University Institute)
  • Hideo Konishi (Boston College), Eric Maskin (Harvard University)
  • Michel Le Breton (Toulouse School of Economics)
  • Juan D. Moreno-Ternero (Universidad Pablo de Olavide)
  • Ignacio Ortuno-Ortin (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)
  • Hans Wiesmeth (Technische Universität Dresden)
  • Eyal Winter (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Detailed information about this conference can be found on http://faculty.smu.edu/bochen/Conference.htm.

Dedman College alumna Lisa Walters is working for the educational nonprofit Global Citizen Year in Ecuador, where a deadly quake hit

SMU News

Originally Posted: April 20, 2016

SMU Aluma in Ecuador and SMU police officer dad grateful for far-reaching support after quake

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DALLAS (SMU) – Everything Lisa Walters learned from earning recent SMU degrees in human rights and Spanish is being put to the ultimate test in Ecuador. She was about to board a plane back to her home in the South American country Saturday, April 16, when she learned Ecuador had been struck by a devastating 7.8-magnitude earthquake.

Lisa, the daughter of SMU Assistant Chief of Police Jim Walters, moved to Ecuador a week after her May 2014 graduation and now works as a team leader for the educational nonprofit group Global Citizen Year (GCY), a program that provides study abroad opportunities for young men and women in their “gap” or “bridge” year between high school and college. She was changing planes in Houston, on her way back to Quito after escorting a group of GCY students to California, when she learned the quake had killed hundreds, injured thousands, and left some 40,000 people searching for shelter, food and family members.

At the time, her usually unruffled police officer father was, “to be honest, frantic,” he says.

Since he and his daughter are close, they communicate almost daily by email or via the international–calling WhatsApp service. Chief Walters worried about her heading to Quito, which had closed its airport to allow in only flights carrying relief supplies.

After the duo connected during Lisa’s delay in Houston, she checked in as “safe” on Facebook –

much to the relief of her 687 friends on the social media network and her Ecuadorean husband of less than three months. Meanwhile, countless people were contacting Chief Walters to inquire about his and Lisa’s wellbeing.

“It was a pretty amazing feeling to hear from so many people, especially at SMU, who showed just how much they care about us,” he says. “It was heartwarming to say the least.”

As Lisa and her father connected with family members and friends during a multi-hour delay in Houston, her flight was finally cleared to return to Quito. But once there, she would spend nearly another full day trying to get a seat on a bus to take her to her home, three hours away in the Imbabura province that borders hard-hit Esmeraldes. READ MORE