SMU Tower Scholar is knee-deep in the business of politics as election season heats up

SMU News Originally Posted: February 22, 2018 Junior Zach Miller says he owes Dedman dean, SMU network for important connections SMU junior Zach Miller’s interest in politics played out like it does for many college students his first couple years at SMU – he volunteered for political campaigns and pursued internships. But then, in the months following Donald Trump’s presidential victory, Miller decided he wanted to kick his involvement up a notch, and earn some compensation at the same time. As the 2018 election season gains momentum, Miller is working as finance director for a Texas Senate hopeful and has launched his own political consulting firm: Atlas Consulting LLC. Miller, an economics major, is benefitting from a unique immersion experience in public policymaking for SMU [...]

By | 2018-02-22T19:25:13+00:00 February 22nd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Graduate News, Political Science, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on SMU Tower Scholar is knee-deep in the business of politics as election season heats up

Mark Cuban says studying philosophy may soon be worth more than computer science—here’s why

CNBC Make it Originally Posted: February 21, 2018 According to billionaire technology entrepreneur Mark Cuban, earning a college degree in computer science might not be the safe investment you think it is. Today, students who study computer science have a high likelihood of scoring a lucrative job: Glassdoor determined computer science and engineering to be the number one highest-paying major to study in 2017. Meanwhile, students of liberal arts subjects often make far less. But Cuban, also an investor on ABC's "Shark Tank," expects that to change. "I'm going to make a prediction," Cuban told AOL in 2017. "In 10 years, a liberal arts degree in philosophy will be worth more than a traditional programming degree." That's because Cuban expects artificial intelligence technology to vastly [...]

By | 2018-02-22T11:22:43+00:00 February 22nd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Philosophy|Comments Off on Mark Cuban says studying philosophy may soon be worth more than computer science—here’s why

Watch: Are You Ready for Mustangs Give Back on March 8?

SMU Video https://youtu.be/hNUdVQF8yIQ March 8th is Mustangs Give Back, SMU's one day giving challenge. You choose what to support! It's easy, just go to smu.edu/mgb on March 8 and choose a project to support. There are matching gifts and challenges that will double your impact! Circle March 8 on your calendar. Choose, give, then share. Pony up! WATCH

HillTopics: Robots are Coming for Our Jobs. Thank God.

HillTopics Originally Posted: February 21, 2018 I’m a Junior in Dedman College, so people are already asking me those pesky, stereotypical end-of-college questions like “Where do you see yourself in ten years?” and “What are you going to do with an English degree?” and, essentially, “How are you going to get a job and support yourself and not be homeless and starving in 3 months?” Often, if my questioner is older I get, “Aren’t you afraid the robots are going to take all the jobs?” I’ve started responding “God, I hope so.” I should explain: I truly love my work. Law is a beautiful thing to me, and I would be perfectly happy to work in it until the day I die. Additionally, my wish [...]

By | 2018-02-22T10:10:49+00:00 February 22nd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, English, Philosophy, Political Science, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on HillTopics: Robots are Coming for Our Jobs. Thank God.

LISTEN: What Pandemics Of The Past Can Teach Us About This Year’s Flu Outbreak

KERA Originally Posted: February 21, 2018 This flu season is making regular headlines, especially in North Texas, where more than 100 people have died. It doesn't compare to the flu crisis the world endured a century ago, but we can still learn from it. Some experts estimate about one-third of the world's population came down with the flu in 1918, and from 50 to 100 million people died. Carolyn Smith-Morris, a medical anthropologist at Southern Methodist University, said people were living in fear and panic during this time. "What we saw then is, in my work, something that we're likely to see [again] should we have a pandemic today," she said. "There are many differences from 1918, but the similarities are in the social reactions — [...]

By | 2018-02-21T08:36:58+00:00 February 21st, 2018|Anthropology, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on LISTEN: What Pandemics Of The Past Can Teach Us About This Year’s Flu Outbreak

Study: DACA Increased Educational Attainment

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: Feb. 13, 2018 A new working paper released by the National Bureau of Economic Research argues that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program had a “significant impact” on the educational and life decisions of undocumented immigrant youth, resulting in a 45 percent decrease in teen birth rates, a 15 percent increase in high school graduation rates and a 20 percent increase in college enrollment rates. The researchers found differential effects by gender, with most of the gains in college enrollment concentrated among women. For men alone, the effect of DACA on college enrollment was not statistically significant. DACA, which was established by former president Obama in 2012, gave certain undocumented immigrant students who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children temporary protection [...]

By | 2018-02-20T08:57:00+00:00 February 20th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Study: DACA Increased Educational Attainment

Solving the dark energy mystery: A new sky survey assignment for a 45-year-old telescope

SMU Research Originally Posted: Feb. 19, 2018 SMU and other members of a scientific consortium prepare for installation of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument to survey the night sky from a mile-high mountain peak in Arizona As part of a large scientific consortium studying dark energy, SMU physicists are on course to help create the largest 3-D map of the universe ever made. The map will emerge from data gathered by the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) being installed on the Nicholas U. Mayall Telescope atop a mountain in Arizona. The map could help solve the mystery of dark energy, which is driving the accelerating expansion of the universe. DESI will capture about 10 times more data than a predecessor survey of space using an array of 5,000 swiveling [...]

By | 2018-02-19T09:55:54+00:00 February 19th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on Solving the dark energy mystery: A new sky survey assignment for a 45-year-old telescope

Watch: Senior Aleena Taufiq found her passion at SMU as a math and mechanical engineering major

SMU YouTube Originally Posted: Watch: Senior Aleena Taufiq is passing on her love for engineering to low-income middle school students through an afterschool program called "Geared Up." https://youtu.be/ON8TsqBUcJw  

By | 2018-02-19T09:52:03+00:00 February 19th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Mathematics, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Watch: Senior Aleena Taufiq found her passion at SMU as a math and mechanical engineering major

Do Human Capital Decisions Respond to the Returns to Education? Evidence from DACA

The National Bureau of Economic Research Originally Posted: Feb. 15, 2018 Highlights: How did DACA impact the educational performances of those who enrolled in it? Significantly, says SMU economics coauthor Elira Kuka. -High school graduation rates increased by 15% -Teenage births declined by 45% -College attendance increased by 25% among women READ MORE

By | 2018-02-16T11:07:12+00:00 February 16th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Do Human Capital Decisions Respond to the Returns to Education? Evidence from DACA

Sign Up to Judge at Dallas Regional Science and Engineering Fair

Calling all SMU Science faculty, staff and graduate students!  Do you remember competing in Science Fair when you were at school?  Now is your chance to sign up to judge at the 2018 Beal Bank Dallas Regional Science and Engineering Fair, Saturday February 24, 2018 at Fair Park in Dallas.  SMU is organizing this event for middle and high school students in Collin, Dallas, Ellis, Fannin, Grayson, Hunt, Kaufman, and Rockwall counties.  The eligibility requirements for judging are a Bachelor’s degree or beyond in the category you judge. Family members, teachers and mentors of participating students are not eligible to judge. Sign up to judge at www.drsef.org.  Questions? Email DRSEFJudge@smu.edu.

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