Department of Psychology congratulates new Phi Beta Kappa members

The Department of Psychology congratulates 3 of its undergraduate majors for being chosen for membership in Phi Beta Kappa. The 3 students are:

Jiani Zhu
Ashley Schneider
Emaan Rangoonwala

This is an outstanding achievement and the highest academic honor one can receive as an undergraduate.

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Jewish Studies and The John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies present Dan Arbell: The US- Turkey-Israel Triangle

Dan Arbell, a scholar-in-residence at the Center for Israeli Studies at American University, is a 25 year veteran of the Israeli Foreign Service, serving in senior posts overseas in the UN, the US and Japan, and holding senior positions at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Headquarters in Jerusalem. Most recently he was Deputy Chief of Mission at the Embassy of Israel in Washington D.C. In the 1990’s he served as Chief of Staff to Israeli Ambassador Itamar Rabinovich. From 2005-2009 he was Acting Head of the North America division at the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jerusalem. Prior to that he was Deputy Chief of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in Tokyo, Japan. Arbell holds a Master’s degree (MA) from Hebrew University in Jerusalem in Political Science and a Bache-lor’s degree (BA) from Hebrew University in World History and Political Science.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 11:15-12:30 KARCHER AUDITORIUM, STOREY HALL

FOR RSVP INFORMATION CLICK HERE

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Junior Bryson Dechambeau finds symmetry in physics, college golf

GolfWeek

By Andy Zunz

Bryson-Dechambeau-SMU-NCAA-Division-1-0933_t640

Bryson Dechambeau could barely turn his neck to see the PowerPoint slides as he elaborated on the finer points of proton decay.

That’s right, proton decay. Just three days after the SMU junior smoked it 348 yards off the tee to win the Western Refining College All-America Golf Classic long drive contest, he delivered a speech that he prepared for more than a month to 12 students in a particle physics classroom.

Dechambeau, you see, isn’t just majoring in golf. He picked physics in order to more intimately learn the mechanics of the golf swing. It’s pretty heady stuff for one of college golf’s top players but that’s the life he leads – a life that includes minors in economics and math too – and it’s beginning to catch up to him. A day after his moonshot, Dechambeau ended up withdrawing from the Western Refining College All-America Golf Classic with a strained trapezius muscle. READ MORE

 

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Neil Foley, History, changing face of America

KERA, Think

Originally aired: Nov. 3, 2014

By 2050, nearly a third of all U.S. residents will be Latino. This hour, we’ll talk about how this growing segment of the population is affecting everything from politics to cultural identity with Neil Foley, the Robert H. and Nancy Dedman Chair in History at SMU. His new book is Mexicans in the Making of America. Listen Here

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Matthew Wilson on the Midterm Elections

KDFW Fox4

Originally aired Nov. 4 2014

Texas voters turned the state an even deeper shade of red if that’s possible. SMU political science professor Matthew Wilson talks about what it means. Watch video

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Joshua Rovner: Nevermind ISIS and Putin — Asia matters more to U.S. strategy

Dallas Morning News

Originally posted: Nov. 4, 2014

The grisly war with the Islamic State and the crisis with Russia continue to dominate the news — and capture the attention of U.S. leaders. Despite all this turmoil, the long-term focus of American foreign policy will not be on the Middle East or Europe. Instead, Washington will be drawn irresistibly to Asia.

No other region is as important for America’s long-term economic well-being. The U.S. trades twice as much with Asia as with Europe, and it is the largest market for U.S. exports outside of North America. Growing Asian economies demand an increasing share of the world’s energy resources, and China is also close to becoming the world’s biggest oil importer.

The military landscape also is changing. For a long time, the regional balance was clear: China was the dominant land power while the United States ruled the waves. As long as neither side could seriously challenge the other, there was little chance of a major regional war. READ MORE

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Cal Jillson, Political Science, can Democrats ever win in Texas?

The New York Times

Originally posted: Nov. 5, 2014

Texas Democrats Ponder How They Will Ever Win
By MANNY FERNANDEZ

……“Democratic leaders are trying to sound upbeat, but their collective heart, having been torn out and stomped on, is clearly not in it,” said Calvin Jillson, a political science professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. “Democrats will not be competitive again in Texas until they grow their share of the Anglo vote from its recent 25 to 30 percent toward 40 percent. That will be hard work, but it is work that simply must be done for Democrats to be more than an afterthought in statewide elections.” READ MORE

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‘William Wells Brown,’ by Ezra Greenspan

New York Times
By NELL IRVIN PAINTER

Originally posted: NOV. 14, 2014

If the publishing industry reflects the American zeitgeist, things have changed when it comes to black American historical figures. As a graduate student at Harvard decades ago, I came across William Wells Brown, the fugitive slave, abolitionist, lecturer, travelogue writer, novelist and performer whose wide-ranging intelligence turned a gaze on white people (for a change). Back then he was to be found in only one full-length biography, William Edward Farrison’s “William Wells Brown: Author and Reformer” (1969). Published by the University of Chicago Press in the twilight of the “second Reconstruction” and at the dawning of African-American studies, it depicted Brown as a representative black American. In the absence of the biographical scholarship coming after 1969, Brown’s colleagues remained ill defined. Farrison’s biography was reviewed only in publishing trade papers and a couple of history journals. What was the problem? READ MORE

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Paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs is receiving worldwide coverage for discovery of the first dinosaur tracks in Angola

The research of an international team co-led by SMU paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs is receiving worldwide coverage for discovery of the first dinosaur tracks discovered in Angola, including those of a mysterious mammal from 118 million years ago.

Reporter Hannah Osborne wrote about the discovery Nov. 5 for The International Business Times in the article “Angola: Huge Mystery Mammal Tracks from Early Cretaceous Period Discovered in Catoca Diamond Mine.”

The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology announced the discovery in a press release Nov. 5, “African diamond mine reveals dinosaur and large mammal tracks.”

The discovery was made by a Octávio Mateus, a member of Projecto PaleoAngola.

Jacobs, a professor of earth sciences at SMU, is a former president of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. His research focus is the interrelationships of biotic and abiotic events through time.

SMU paleontologist Michael J. Polcyn is also a member of the Projecto PaleoAngola team.

The PaleoAngola researchers have described Angola as a “museum in the ground” for the abundance of fossils there.

A professor in Dedman College’s Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Jacobs joined SMU’s faculty in 1983.

In the laboratory, Jacobs’ research utilizes advanced imaging and stable isotope techniques to investigate paleoenvironmental, biogeographic and phylogenetic issues of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras.

Polcyn is director of the Visualization Laboratory in SMU’s Department of Earth Sciences and an SMU research associate.

A world-recognized expert on the extinct marine reptile named Mosasaur, Polcyn’s research interests include the early evolution of Mosasauroidea and adaptations in secondarily aquatic tetrapods. Polcyn’s research also includes application of technology to problems in paleontology.

READ MORE

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The Makings of Jane Austen

Professor Devoney Looser, Arizona State University, will present her research on the reception of Jane Austen from the late nineteenth century forward in a Gilbert Lecture on November 13, 2014 in McCord Auditorium. Receptions begins at 6:00 PM.

For more information: Gilbert Lectures

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