News

Tower Center Forum: Populism in Europe and Germany

Event Date: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
Location: Great Hall, Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall

Dr. Sergey Lagodinsky is currently Head of the EU/North America Department of the Heinrich Böll Foundation based in Berlin. He is an attorney and author, also working as consultant on strategy and leadership. Sergey’s areas of expertise include transatlantic relations, international and constitutional law as well law and politics of diversity and integration. He is a Member of the Assembly of Representatives of the Jewish Community of Berlin and was a founding chairman of the Jewish Working Group in the Social Democratic Party in Germany (SPD). He ran for the German Bundestag for the German Green Party in 2013.

Sergey is a regular guest and contributor to major German and international media outlets. He has appeared among others on Deutschlandfunk, DeutschlandradioKultur, the BBC World Service, Radio Liberty and various other radio stations. For many years he was a regular guest on Deutsche Welle TV and a political host and commentator on the global Russian channel RTVi. His commentaries have been published by the Süddeutsche Zeitung, ZEIT, Handelsblatt, taz and Tagesspiegel, among others. His recent book Contexts of Antisemitism (Metropol Publishing, 2014) explores the relationship between freedom of speech and protection against anti-Semitism in German and international law. Sergey holds a PhD degree in law from the Berlin’s Humboldt University, a law degree from the University of Göttingen and a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard University. From 2008-2009, he was a fellow with the stiftung neue verantwortung in Berlin and in 2010 – a Yale World Fellow in residence at Yale University in New Haven. READ MORE

The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required.

Annual Allman Lecture: Fear and Loathing – Political Neuro-Biology and the 2016 Elections

Jeff Fitlow
Jeff Fitlow

Location: McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall
Date: October 20, 2016
Time: 5:00 p.m. Reception, 5:30 p.m. Lecture

What can burrowing mice and African bonobos tells us about Donald & Ted & Hilary & Bernie? Aristotle famously observed that “man is by nature a political animal” and that “a social instinct is implanted in all men by nature”. A recent twin study concluded that roughly half of the variance in political ideology is attributable to genetic influences. Apparently Aristotle was correct. Join John Alford of Rice University as he delves into the deep ideological divisions that are shaping the 2016 elections.

Link for more information: http://www.smu.edu/dedman/dcii

 

Director’s Visiting Scholar Lecture

McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall
Date: September 22, 2016
Time: 5:30 p.m.

Book Cover

Join Professor Graff of Ohio State University as he presents a special lecture on his book, Undisciplining Knowledge: Interdisciplinarity in the Twentieth Century. Graff presents the first comparative and critical history of interdisciplinary initiatives in the modern university.

Link for more information: http://www.smu.edu/dedman/dcii

 

 

 

Deadline Extended: 2016-2017 Interdisciplinary Fellowship in the Digital Humanities

The fellowship experience will let you explore new ideas and topics, broaden your expertise, enhance your sophistication in interviews, and see how your skills relate to and can be helpful to those in other fields. Students will leave this course with the skills necessary to execute a digital humanities project and engage in top-level conversations across many fields. This will be the 3rd year of the interdisciplinary fellowship, and the 1st year to focus on digital humanities. Deadline to apply is 6/7.

For more information: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Programs/Graduate%20Fellowship%20Program

 

College grads, take heart: You’re entering best job market in years

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: May 24, 2016

On a recent Tuesday afternoon, the denizens of Southern Methodist University’s campus seemed to move at a leisurely pace.

A few cyclists clicked along the pathways and the stately brick buildings, with their bright white colonnades, were quiet. Commencement had taken place a few days earlier.

But for Regina James, the busy season was getting into full swing.

“There are still students who are in transition. They’re either waiting to hear back about offers — there’s a little anxiousness there — or they’re students that maybe just didn’t get around to the search, so they’re starting to reach out and say, ‘I don’t have anything yet,’” she said. “Those students, we’ll be helping throughout the summer.”

James is the associate director for employer relations at SMU’s Hegi career center.

Experts say newly-minted college graduates in the Dallas area are entering one of the best job markets they’ve seen. But James said that’s no excuse to slack off in the hunt.

“We encourage students to have multiple internships for a number of reasons,” she said. “You’ve got to think about it as, not only are you competing against your peers here, you’re competing against peers from other institutions in the area, you’re competing against institutions nationally [whose students] may desire to live in the Dallas area.”

According to a report by the firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas, 1.8 million Americans with four-year degrees are expected to enter the workforce this year, where they’ll be greeted by the best job market for college graduates in several years.

The report cites the fact that the nation has seen almost 70 months of job gains, meaning that 14 million workers have been added to payrolls across the country. Meanwhile, Baby Boomers are retiring.

A National Association of Colleges and Employers survey found that companies are slated to hire 5.2 percent more new graduates than a year ago.

And, the report says, 59 metro areas have unemployment rates below 4.0 percent.

All of those factors add up to a demand for workers who are ready to start their careers.

In Dallas-Fort Worth — one of those metro areas with a low unemployment rate — there’s extra momentum, said Bud Weinstein, an economist and associate director of the Maguire Energy Institute at SMU’s Cox School of Business.

The region’s economy is more diverse than it’s ever been. And more companies are relocating or expanding in North Texas — in part because they’re attracted by the area’s talent pool.

“Dallas-Fort Worth probably has the strongest job market in the nation among large metropolitan areas — maybe not in absolute numbers, but certainly in percentage terms,” Weinstein said. “I think the job market has never looked better, particularly for college graduates.”

Michael Carroll, director of UNT’s Economics Research Group, added that although energy and manufacturing jobs across the state are hurting, “we’re fairly insulated from that” in North Texas.

A flood of migration into the state, Carroll said, has also helped keep wages at a manageable level and competition for workers from scaring off new jobs.

“I think it’s a real positive with all the companies moving in,” he said.

Higher education institutions around the region say they’re bullish on the possibilities for their graduates — whether they’re armed with a bachelor’s degree or trade certification.

“I cannot even tell you — we’re tripping over jobs,” said Dawn Gomez, career services coordinator at the Dallas County Community College District’s Northlake College in Irving.

The hard part, she said, is connecting students with the right employer in an age when job hunters have countless online resources.

“Soft skills, communication, critical thinking, teamwork — employers want those that can pull it all together in a composed, succinct package,” Gomez said.

For Morgan Slottje, who graduated from SMU in December, settling on a career path wasn’t easy.

As an undergraduate, she said with a chuckle, she changed majors “at least 10 times.”

Throughout college, she also test drove various jobs through internships: She worked on Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign, she worked in marketing.

When the time came to focus on the job search, Slottje, 23, applied to “hundreds” of jobs she said sounded interesting, from advertising to financial analysis. She considered getting a master’s degree in statistics.

In the end, Slottje said she went to a Deloitte presentation and felt a strong sense that its values aligned with hers: An emphasis on continuing to learn and grow.

“I picked a company where their values really align with mine,” she said. “That’s important with the job search — I want a career. I want to love what I’m doing.”

And although Slottje said she was open to moving to another city, she preferred to stay in Dallas, close to her parents and where living costs are more manageable than in New York, where she went to school for 2 and a half years before switching to SMU.

“I’d rather be in a city like Dallas when I’m starting a career,” she said. “I’m versed in tech, but when I was interviewing [with a company in the] Bay Area, I was thinking, ‘No matter what I’m getting paid, I’m going to be so poor.’”

She’ll be starting a job here, in business technology consulting at Deloitte in July.

Reggie Davis, a 21-year-old University of North Texas logistics student, won’t graduate until next year.

He said he’s optimistic about his job prospects, particularly in logistics. In D-FW, information technology and other “knowledge” jobs that require college degrees are in high demand, particularly given the breadth of the region’s transportation industry.

His father, too, works in logistics, meaning he’s had exposure to the jobs for years.

Nevertheless, Davis said he’s not cruising to graduation day.

For one thing, UNT’s logistics program requires that students intern before they graduate, so he’ll be working at Schneider Logistics this summer.

Davis is also participating in the school’s professional leadership program, which aims to prep students for business leadership with access to mentors and professional development opportunities.

He said that although he’s been around supply chain and logistics work — it’s what his dad does, too — he sees the internship as both a way to get an edge and to test out which specific type of job he might like best.

“If I end up doing well in the internship and enjoying it, I would be glad to consider a full-time position or transition to being a full-time employee,” he said. “But I don’t want to put all my eggs in one basket.” READ MORE

Tim Cassedy, English, creates Shakespeare-inspired card game Bards Dispense Profanity

Mental Floss

Originally Posted: May 19, 2016

If you’re a recovering English major with a debauched mind, then bawdy, literary-inspired word prompt games are likely more your speed than Apples to Apples. That’s why there’s Bards Dispense Profanity

The Shakespeare-themed group party activity contains 100 “mock-serious” prompts and 375 answers copied word-for-word from Shakespeare’s works. Each player receives seven quote cards, which they use to anonymously finish an open-ended prompt. A “Profanity Judge” chooses the best (read: the dirtiest and/or most hilarious) one. Then the next player serves as arbitrator and the process begins anew. READ MORE

Early armored dino from Texas lacked cousin’s club-tail weapon, but had a nose for danger

SMU Research

Originally Posted: May 23, 2016

Pawpawsaurus’s hearing wasn’t keen, and it lacked the infamous tail club of Ankylosaurus. But first-ever CT scans of Pawpawsaurus’s skull indicate the dino’s saving grace from predators may have been an acute sense of smell.

Well-known armored dinosaur Ankylosaurus is famous for a hard knobby layer of bone across its back and a football-sized club on its tail for wielding against meat-eating enemies.

It’s prehistoric cousin, Pawpawsaurus campbelli, was not so lucky. Pawpawsaurus was an earlier version of armored dinosaurs but not as well equipped to fight off meat-eaters, according to a new study, said vertebrate paleontologist Louis Jacobs, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Jacobs is co-author of a new analysis of Pawpawsaurus based on the first CT scans ever taken of the dinosaur’s skull. READ MORE

Rick Halperin, Embrey Human Rights, Pfizer stops selling drugs used for executions

KFAB Radio

Originally Posted: May 17, 2016

Rick Halperin is an SMU professor who is a specialist and expert on the death penalty. He says that Pfizer’s announcement last week that they will not allow any of their drugs to be used or sold for use in executions will be a major blow to many states who will now have no source of the drugs needed in their execution protocol. This leaves them only a couple options, which he outlines. READ MORE

Political Science professors Cal Jillson and Matthew Wilson comment on Greg Abbot latest book and political future

Star-Telegram

Originally Posted: May 21, 2016

Greg Abbott’s book, bus tour put him in the political fast lane

Gov. Greg Abbott’s bus tour is meant to take him places.

I mean, besides a Half Price Books near Westworth Village.

When Abbott’s Broken But Unbowed tour bus rolls into Fort Worth today, it will be hauling the governor’s political hopes but also his baggage.

Abbott, a 23-year elected official serving his first term as governor, is positioning himself for a possible national political campaign or appointment.

But even arriving by luxury motor coach, Abbott does not make as much noise as former TV sports anchor and radio entertainer Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, a potential political rival.

If Abbott has hope for higher office, he must clearly command state government. But with a divisive Republican presidential campaign ahead, followed by the Legislature in January (bringing more daily Patrick press conferences), this is almost Abbott’s only time to rally attention.

“Abbott is as cautious as Patrick is aggressive,” said Southern Methodist University political science professor Cal Jillson, “so Abbott always keeps an eye on him to be sure Patrick does not get by him on the right.”

Abbott is building his national conservative profile with the book, a memoir of his recovery from a disabling 1984 accident and also an essay on constitutional government. READ MORE