From Dinosaurs to Data Networks: Texas and the Arctic in the Anthropocene

Medium Originally Posted: November 6, 2016 “Report from the Top of the World!” The flier caught my attention immediately. The U.S. Embassy in Oslo and the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Washington, DC wanted to send graduate journalism students to the Norwegian Arctic as part of a new internshipprogram. I applied because I wanted to gain a global perspective on my research and reporting. Less than a year later, I found myself standing on an empty beach near Bugøynes on the northern coast of Norway, silent except for the call of a distant bird and the lapping of cold water against the shore. Towering overhead were the sharp black rocks and dark islands of the fjords, silhouetted by midnight sun that glowed a soft, radiant white behind a sheet of fog. [...]

By | November 17th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on From Dinosaurs to Data Networks: Texas and the Arctic in the Anthropocene

Tough Turtle: Dino-Killing Asteroid Spared Sea Creature

Live Science Originally Posted: November 8, 2016 Shortly after an asteroid smashed into Earth about 65.5 million years ago, obliterating much of life on Earth,an ancient sea turtle with a triangular-shaped head swam along the relatively arid shores of southern Africa, a new study finds. The creature, a newly identified species, lived about 64 million years ago during the Paleocene, an epoch within the Paleogene period, the researchers said. The animal is closely related to earlier seaturtles that lived before the asteroid struck, an event known as the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary, which marks the mass extinction that killed about 75 percent of all species on Earth, including the nonavian dinosaurs. "If these sea turtles do, in fact, form a tightly knit group, evolutionarily speaking, then the [African] specimen provides proof [...]

By | November 8th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Tough Turtle: Dino-Killing Asteroid Spared Sea Creature

Department of Earth Sciences alumni display SMU pride at Hokkaido University Museum

On the right is Dr. Yoshitsugu Kobayashi, a professor at Hokkaido University, Soporo, Japan.  He received a master’s and Ph.D. In Earth Sciences from SMU.  On the left is Yosuke Nishida, now an editor for Springer based in Tokyo, who received his MS in Earth Sciences from SMU.  The photos were taken in the Hokkaido University Museum.

By | October 18th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Department of Earth Sciences alumni display SMU pride at Hokkaido University Museum

Dale Winkler, Shuler Museum of Paleontology, featured in a series of essays on the Trinity Project, published on Frontburner

D Magazine, Frontburner Originally Posted: October 11, 2016 In addition to Pioneer Cemetery, there’s another quiet space in Dallas that holds the bones of ancestors: the Shuler Museum of Paleontology, located on the SMU campus. The Shuler Museum has no fully assembled skeletons of prehistoric carnivores on premises or other dazzling displays (though the day I visited, there was a stack of giant turtle shells in plaster jackets in the hallway, outside the entrance). For one, the museum is a shoebox of a space located on the basement floor of the Earth Sciences building. There isn’t the room for that sort of thing. Second, the fossils here function as teaching and research collections. A casual visit from a non-expert like me requires an appointment and [...]

By | October 18th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Dale Winkler, Shuler Museum of Paleontology, featured in a series of essays on the Trinity Project, published on Frontburner

Special DPS – SMU Lecture! October 4

Tuesday, Oct 4th, 7:30 PM, 153 Heroy Hall, Southern Methodist University Dr. Barbara Seuss of Friedrich-Alexander University in Erlangen, Germany, will speak on "The Buckhorn Asphalt Quarry - An upper Carboniferous 'Impregnation Lagerstätte' ". In the Arbuckles near Sulphur, Oklahoma, a Pennsylvanian asphalt seep preserved aragonitic shells, tiny larvae and protoconchs, and delicate ornamentation and microstructure of many species. The deposit contains the best preserved Paleozoic molluscs in the world. Dr. Seuss will discuss the geology of the deposit, its facies and fauna, isotopic analyses, and bio-erosion and predation observed in some of the fossils. SMU faculty, students, and DPS members and friends are invited to this free lecture. Parking will be free in the lot just W of Heroy Hall. For more information: Dr. [...]

By | October 2nd, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Special DPS – SMU Lecture! October 4

Drone video footage of Malawi dig site

YouTube Originally Posted: August 22, 2016 American archaeologists of their field areas in Malawi, where Louis Jacobs is now. He is working with Dr. Elizabeth Gomani Chindebvu, former SMU graduate student.  The Mwakasyunguti valley is below the red layer where the archaeologists were digging.  The dinosaur beds are the light colored beds. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YPYHn26Twk&feature=youtu.be

By | August 26th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Drone video footage of Malawi dig site

Oh, the places Dedman College students will go… (after graduation)!

Mustang Minute: Hall of Fame running back Reggie Dupard ’99 leads Garland ISD students on a tour of his alma mater, with stops to meet Head Football Coach Chad Morris and SMU’s dinosaur expert Louis Jacobs

Mustang Minute Originally Posted: August 5, 2016 https://youtu.be/T1YQINaGTfo

By | August 5th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Mustang Minute: Hall of Fame running back Reggie Dupard ’99 leads Garland ISD students on a tour of his alma mater, with stops to meet Head Football Coach Chad Morris and SMU’s dinosaur expert Louis Jacobs

Laser Beats Rock: Armored Dinosaur May Have Relied Most on Sense of Smell

Laser Beats Rock Originally Posted: July 25, 2016 Independent science journalist Sarah Puschmann covered the research of SMU Earth Sciences Professor Louis L. Jacobs in a post on her blog “Armored Dinosaur May Have Relied Most on Sense of Smell.” A professor in Dedman College‘s Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Jacobs is co-author of a new analysis of the Cretaceous Period dinosaur Pawpawsaurus based on the first CT scans ever taken of the dinosaur’s skull. A Texas native from what is now Tarrant County, Pawpawsaurus lived 100 million years ago, making its home along the shores of an inland sea that split North America from Texas northward to the Arctic Sea. READ MORE EXCERPT: By Sarah Puschmann Laser Beats Rock In 1819, the [...]

By | July 27th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Laser Beats Rock: Armored Dinosaur May Have Relied Most on Sense of Smell

Post-Gondwana Africa and the vertebrate history of the Angolan Atlantic Coast

Memoirs of Museum Victoria Originally Posted: July 25, 2016 Authors: Louis L. Jacobs1, MichaelJ. Polcyn1, Octávio Mateus, Anne S. Schulp, António Olímpio Gonçalves and Maria Luísa Morais Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275, United States (jacobs@smu.edu; mpolcyn@smu.edu)  Abstract: The separation of Africa from South America and the growth of the South Atlantic are recorded in rocks exposed along the coast of Angola. Tectonic processes that led to the formation of Africa as a continent also controlled sedimentary basins that preserve fossils. The vertebrate fossil record in Angola extends from the Triassic to the Holocene and includes crocodylomorph, dinosaur, and mammaliamorph footprints, but more extensively, bones of fishes, turtles, plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, crocodiles, and cetaceans. Pterosaurs, dinosaurs, and land mammals are [...]

By | July 25th, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Post-Gondwana Africa and the vertebrate history of the Angolan Atlantic Coast
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