The Dallas Man Who Inspired Yellow Submarine’s Jeremy Hillary Boob Has Died

Dallas Observer

Originally Posted: May 4, 2016

Jeremy DuQuesnay Adams didn’t live a life in music, but for the world at large it will be the thing he’ll always be remembered for. Adams, a longtime professor at SMU, was a brilliant scholar who dedicate his life to education and writing. But in 1968, he became a part of music history when he was immortalized as the inspiration for a major character in the Beatles’ animated film, Yellow Submarine. READ MORE

SMU Mourns Loss of Professor Jeremy duQuesnay Adams

SMU NEWS

Originally Posted: May 4, 2016

Distinguished SMU Professor of History Jeremy duQuesnay Adams, beloved by generations of students, honored by colleagues worldwide and the inspiration for a character in the Beatles’ Yellow Submarine, died May 2, 2016 at the age of 82.

A memorial service is scheduled for Friday, May 6, at 11:00 a.m. in Perkins Chapel at SMU.

More than 40 years ago, Adams and his wife, Bonnie Wheeler of SMU’s Department of English, came to SMU, where they invented SMU’s interdisciplinary Medieval Studies Program with colleagues across the University and the Dallas area. Through the years, Adams’ courses on medieval history played a central role in the expansion and growing reputation of this program, which now offers a popular undergraduate minor and major and a master’s degree. Adams also taught at and directed SMU study-abroad programs in France and Spain and, most frequently, in the SMU-in-Oxford program in England. READ MORE

Dedman College’s Matthew Wilson and Jeffrey Engel featured in “Third Rail” series

SMU News

Originally Posted: May 9, 2016

SMU “Third Rail” series to take on the topics that others won’t

First debate is May 9

DALLAS (SMU) – Tapping into frustration over political and personal incivility, and the inability to work toward middle ground on contentious topics, SMU’s Center for Presidential History and the Cary Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility are launching The Third Rail Series Monday evening, May 9, to analyze and discuss deliberately touchy issues.

Free and open to the public, the first program will feature SMU scholars Maria Dixon Hall, Matthew Wilson and Jeffrey Engel discussing the unusual anger and extremism revealed in the current presidential campaign. Engel will moderate a debate between Hall and Wilson on the topic, “The 2016 presidential campaign has revealed unusual anger and extremism: Should political discourse be less sensitive to identity politics?”

By definition, a voter is embracing identity politics if any single interest – such as race, gender, or position on a particular social issue – decides their support for or opposition to a candidate regardless of the candidate’s views on other topics.

The “Third Rail” discussion will begin at 7 p.m. in McCord Auditorium in Dallas Hall, preceded by a light coffee service at 6:30 p.m. Parking will be available and free passes will be emailed to registered guests before the event. Seating is limited, and not guaranteed. Register online.

Maria Dixon Hall, associate professor of corporate communication and public affairs, will argue for sensitivity to identity politics in political discourse; Matthew Wilson, associate professor of political science will argue for less sensitivity, and Engel, who is director of the Center for Presidential History at SMU, will guide the discussion and encourage audience participation.

“America faces profoundly difficult issues,” Engel said. “Race, inequality, guns, injustice and war only begin to start the list. But what is most troubling of late is our inability as a nation to discuss problems that plague us without resorting to angry rhetoric or retreating to silence when we would like to say more.

“SMU’s new Third Rail Series is designed to break the silence,” Engel said. “We intend to support our university and our city in discussing the topics others won’t, addressing the issues we’ve become too frightened to debate, using the direct language many have become too fearful to employ.”

In each “Third Rail” session, two members of the SMU faculty will discuss one of the toughest issues of our day, and also engage with the audience, “in a thoughtful and respectful manner befitting a great University,” Engel added.

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SMU’s May 14 Commencement celebrates academic achievement

SMU News

Originally Posted: May 3, 2016

SMU will celebrate the academic accomplishments of more than 2,500 students at its 101st annual Commencement ceremony at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 14, in Moody Coliseum.

Guests are urged to arrive early as seating in the coliseum is limited to four guests per student. Additional seating will be available for a simulcast of the event at Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports, Crum Auditorium and McFarlin Auditorium. The ceremony also will be broadcast outside Moody Coliseum on Bolin Plaza, and there will be a live webcast of the ceremony at http://www.smu.edu/live.

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In Memoriam — Jeremy DuQuesnay Adams, Professor of History and Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor

Adams2Dedman College is deeply saddened by the loss of Jeremy DuQuesnay Adams, Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor of History. Professor Adams passed away on May 2, 2016. A highly regarded scholar of medieval history, Professor Adams was a beloved teacher who influenced generations of students.

Professor Adams’ faculty profile lists his scholarly achievements; a recent article in the Dallas Observer highlights a lesser known aspect of his life.

He will be deeply missed.

Jeffrey Engel, Center for Presidential History, Is Sounding Presidential Important?

Presidential Historian Jeffrey Engel looks at the outcomes of Tuesday’s (April 26) primaries and notes the differences in the tones of victory speeches by Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump.

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International Symposium on Violence in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands a Success

April 27, 2016

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Panel: Alfredo Corchado, DMN; Alan Knight, Oxford; Joaquin Rivaya-Martinez, Texas State University; Gerardo Gurza, Instituto Mora; Brandon Morgan, New Mexico Community College

Dallas, TX – SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies, in partnership with the Instituto Mora of Mexico City, hosted a public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border on Saturday, April 16, at the Latino Cultural Center in Dallas.

Bringing together scholars and journalists from Mexico, the United States and Great Britain, the international forum focused on the long evolution of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border, from the role of the state in borderland violence, drugs and smuggling, to refugees, migrants and mob violence. Over 200 people attended the afternoon conference featuring panel discussions centered on the evolution of violence along the border from the 1800s to the modern drug wars.

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Sherry Smith welcomes and introduces symposium

“Because of the modern drug wars, the border today has an enduring reputation as a site of brutal violence,” noted Andrew J. Torget, a professor of history at the University of North Texas and one of the organizers of the event. “But what people tend to forget is that border violence has changed dramatically during the past two centuries, and there is nothing inevitable about today’s situation. This public event will present historical background for the modern situation, as we discuss how border violence has evolved over time.”

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Group photo of presenters on the steps of Dallas Hall

Sponsored by the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at SMU in partnership with Instituto Mora of Mexico City, and with support from SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program and the Latino Cultural Center, a division of the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs.

LEARN MORE: The official program brochure with presenter names and affiliations. HERE

Watch the public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border.

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Part 2: 
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Part 3:
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The Center for Presidential History has become a hub for current, in depth and innovative research.

SMU NEWS

Originally Posted: April 19, 2016

DALLAS (SMU) – When SMU’s Center for Presidential History (CPH) arrived on campus in 2012, Founding Director Jeffrey Engel had great expectations for bringing to life – and to Dallas – the detailed history of America’s chief executives.

In less than four years, CPH has become a hub for current, in depth and innovative research in presidential history. Through postdoctoral fellowships, on-campus writing fellowships, community engagement, a unique Collective Memory Project and publishing volumes based on its own work, the center provides a unique understanding of both history and public affairs. READ MORE