Celebrating Dedman College Faculty Books

  • View a slideshow of the event photos here.
  • For more information on Dedman College faculty books, click here.

English professor establishes Kimbilio to provide networking, educational and professional advancement opportunities for emerging African-American writers.

Detroit News

Originally Posted: May 10, 2016

Author Desiree Cooper says newcomers to the annual Kimbilio Fiction retreat for African-American writers “talk like they’ve been on a lifeboat and they’re just trying to hold on until they can find that place that keeps them safe.”

David Haynes, a novelist and professor of English at Dallas’ Southern Methodist University, established Kimbilio in 2013 as a means of providing networking, educational and professional advancement opportunities for emerging African-American writers. The organization has since amassed a network of 60 fellows; held three writers’ retreats in Taos, New Mexico, and initiated a nationwide series of reading events featuring its fellows. Kimbilio’s next reading event will be Wednesday at Pages Bookshop, featuring fellows Cooper, Angela Flournoy and Cole Lavalais.

Haynes says the organization’s name was derived from a Swahili word meaning “safe haven.”

“For so many writers of color, traditional retreats or traditional M.F.A. programs or various other support networks have not always been welcoming and safe places,” Haynes says. “That’s been one of the real drivers behind creating spaces where we can grow and learn as a community, and really develop important and necessary mutual support networks.” READ MORE

Congratulations to Codey Marshall, Marine Corps veteran, father and soon-to-be SMU graduate

SMU News
Originally Posted: May 12, 2016

 

DALLAS (SMU) – When Codey Marshall was just a kid from Garland, he enjoyed watching the SMU football team vigorously chasing its opponents across the field at old Ownby Stadium.

He had no idea then the grand journey life held in store, or that it would return him to the Hilltop.

Three decades later, Marshall, 36, is preparing to enter another SMU athletic venue – Moody Coliseum, all decked out for spring commencement. He will be in a cap and gown, celebrating a hard-earned markets and culture degree and a life come full circle after a long, daring, and unconventional story.

“I’m a veteran of the Marine Corps and I’m a father,” says Marshall. He has three children now, and was only 22-years old when he deployed to Iraq in 2002. But he concedes that coming back to school made him nervous.

“You’re scared. You’re trying to figure it out. You wonder, ‘Can I still do this?’” But education was his therapy, Marshall says.

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“It was my reintegration to society. It gave me something and helped me along in my process. I had the most wonderful advisors and professors that anyone could ever ask for at Dedman College and that really made this as smooth a process as it could be.”

Marshal knows where he’s going next. The outgoing vice president of U.S. MilVets of SMU, Marshall recently accepted a position with Veterans Coalition of North Texas, a non-profit organization he described as a “gap-filler” that coordinates the region’s various veteran services to make sure no veteran is forgotten.

“I feel it is my job to give back wherever I can,” says Marshall, who will continue his SMU education in the Cox Executive MBA program this fall. “

Looking back on his time at SMU, he says, “It’s been insane – It’s been fun. But I love the fact that my children can see what I’m doing and appreciate what I’m doing. If you put the time in, it works.” READ MORE

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Congratulations to John Kalkanli, graduating in May with dual degrees in International Studies and Markets and Culture with a minor in human rights

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This week we are sharing some powerful SMU stories from the class of 2016… John Kalkanli has never seen the campus of SMU, but he says he loves it none-the-less. John Kalkanli is blind. Born in Turkey with a disorder that robbed him of his sight from day one, his family brought him to Dallas six times in his first five years of life to attempt surgeries they hoped would make him see. None of the surgeries worked, but eventually he found something else in Dallas – a future home at SMU. After Kalkanli graduates in May with dual degrees in International Studies and Markets and Culture with a minor in human rights, he will enroll in SMU’s Masters of Liberal Studies program with a focus on human rights. After that, he hopes to work for an international human rights organization like Amnesty International or the International Rescue Committee. Congratulations John, we look forward to watching as you change the world. Read more of John’s story at the link in profile. #smugrad

A photo posted by SMU (@smudallas) on May 10, 2016 at 3:21pm PDT

SMU physicists: CERN’s Large Hadron Collider is once again smashing protons, taking data

SMU Research

Originally Posted: May 10, 2016

CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments are back in action, now taking physics data for 2016 to get an improved understanding of fundamental physics.

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Following its annual winter break, the most powerful collider in the world has been switched back on.

Geneva-based CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — an accelerator complex and its experiments — has been fine-tuned using low-intensity beams and pilot proton collisions, and now the LHC and the experiments are ready to take an abundance of data.

The goal is to improve our understanding of fundamental physics, which ultimately in decades to come can drive innovation and inventions by researchers in other fields.

Scientists from SMU’s Department of Physics are among the several thousand physicists worldwide who contribute on the LHC research. READ MORE

Dedman College’s Matthew Wilson and Jeffrey Engel featured in “Third Rail” series

SMU News

Originally Posted: May 9, 2016

SMU “Third Rail” series to take on the topics that others won’t

First debate is May 9

DALLAS (SMU) – Tapping into frustration over political and personal incivility, and the inability to work toward middle ground on contentious topics, SMU’s Center for Presidential History and the Cary Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility are launching The Third Rail Series Monday evening, May 9, to analyze and discuss deliberately touchy issues.

Free and open to the public, the first program will feature SMU scholars Maria Dixon Hall, Matthew Wilson and Jeffrey Engel discussing the unusual anger and extremism revealed in the current presidential campaign. Engel will moderate a debate between Hall and Wilson on the topic, “The 2016 presidential campaign has revealed unusual anger and extremism: Should political discourse be less sensitive to identity politics?”

By definition, a voter is embracing identity politics if any single interest – such as race, gender, or position on a particular social issue – decides their support for or opposition to a candidate regardless of the candidate’s views on other topics.

The “Third Rail” discussion will begin at 7 p.m. in McCord Auditorium in Dallas Hall, preceded by a light coffee service at 6:30 p.m. Parking will be available and free passes will be emailed to registered guests before the event. Seating is limited, and not guaranteed. Register online.

Maria Dixon Hall, associate professor of corporate communication and public affairs, will argue for sensitivity to identity politics in political discourse; Matthew Wilson, associate professor of political science will argue for less sensitivity, and Engel, who is director of the Center for Presidential History at SMU, will guide the discussion and encourage audience participation.

“America faces profoundly difficult issues,” Engel said. “Race, inequality, guns, injustice and war only begin to start the list. But what is most troubling of late is our inability as a nation to discuss problems that plague us without resorting to angry rhetoric or retreating to silence when we would like to say more.

“SMU’s new Third Rail Series is designed to break the silence,” Engel said. “We intend to support our university and our city in discussing the topics others won’t, addressing the issues we’ve become too frightened to debate, using the direct language many have become too fearful to employ.”

In each “Third Rail” session, two members of the SMU faculty will discuss one of the toughest issues of our day, and also engage with the audience, “in a thoughtful and respectful manner befitting a great University,” Engel added.

READ MORE

SMU’s May 14 Commencement celebrates academic achievement

SMU News

Originally Posted: May 3, 2016

SMU will celebrate the academic accomplishments of more than 2,500 students at its 101st annual Commencement ceremony at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 14, in Moody Coliseum.

Guests are urged to arrive early as seating in the coliseum is limited to four guests per student. Additional seating will be available for a simulcast of the event at Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports, Crum Auditorium and McFarlin Auditorium. The ceremony also will be broadcast outside Moody Coliseum on Bolin Plaza, and there will be a live webcast of the ceremony at http://www.smu.edu/live.

READ MORE

Could Texas’ dirty coal power plants be replaced by geothermal systems?

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: April 26, 2016

For Texas electricity customers, geothermal energy is pretty much an afterthought. But some scientists — and even some people in the oil and gas business — say that heat from deep underground may become a significant source of power.

International Symposium on Violence in the U.S.-Mexican Borderlands a Success

April 27, 2016

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Panel: Alfredo Corchado, DMN; Alan Knight, Oxford; Joaquin Rivaya-Martinez, Texas State University; Gerardo Gurza, Instituto Mora; Brandon Morgan, New Mexico Community College

Dallas, TX – SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies, in partnership with the Instituto Mora of Mexico City, hosted a public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border on Saturday, April 16, at the Latino Cultural Center in Dallas.

Bringing together scholars and journalists from Mexico, the United States and Great Britain, the international forum focused on the long evolution of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border, from the role of the state in borderland violence, drugs and smuggling, to refugees, migrants and mob violence. Over 200 people attended the afternoon conference featuring panel discussions centered on the evolution of violence along the border from the 1800s to the modern drug wars.

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Sherry Smith welcomes and introduces symposium

“Because of the modern drug wars, the border today has an enduring reputation as a site of brutal violence,” noted Andrew J. Torget, a professor of history at the University of North Texas and one of the organizers of the event. “But what people tend to forget is that border violence has changed dramatically during the past two centuries, and there is nothing inevitable about today’s situation. This public event will present historical background for the modern situation, as we discuss how border violence has evolved over time.”

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Group photo of presenters on the steps of Dallas Hall

Sponsored by the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at SMU in partnership with Instituto Mora of Mexico City, and with support from SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program and the Latino Cultural Center, a division of the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs.

LEARN MORE: The official program brochure with presenter names and affiliations. HERE

Watch the public forum on the history of violence along the U.S.-Mexico border.

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Part 2: 
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Part 3:
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Leading Lady: Jenny Torres, Interim President of SMU’s Multicultural Greek Council

HC at SMU

Originally Posted: April 23, 2016

SMU is proud to be home to world changers, and it all starts with the moment a student decides to become a leader. We are proud here at Her Campus to present SMU’s Leading Ladies, taking charge and making a difference in the community.

This week, we got to know senior Jenny Torres, a human rights and public policy student who is also the interim president of the Multicultural Greek Council. Recently, she was honored with two Hilltop Excellence Awards: the Emme V. Baine Legacy and A. Kenneth Pye Outstanding Greek Leader Awards. Receiving two honors in one night is fitting for a woman who seems to do everything at once. READ MORE