Scientific literacy series returns with lecture on 100th anniversary of Einstein’s Theory of Relativity

SMU NEWS

DALLAS (SMU) – The Scientific Literacy Series at SMU kicked off last fall with discussions on why learning about science is important and how scientists can better communicate their findings to the public. This spring, the series returns with a lecture commemorating one of the greatest scientific discoveries of modern times: Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity.

“Without the Theory of General Relativity, GPS devices would be wrong every day by 11 kilometers more than the day before,” says SMU Associate Professor in Physics Stephen Sekula, who will deliver the lecture at 5:15 p.m. on Feb. 4 in the Meadows Museum’s Jones Hall.

“It’s an exciting time today, just as I’m sure it was 100 years ago when the physics of the day failed to explain the world,” Sekula adds. “We’re close to that point again, and that’s exciting.”

Sekula’s lecture is hosted by the Anniversary Series of the Godbey Lectures and the Scientific Literacy Series, which is sponsored by the Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute (DCII).

“Having Stephen talk about Einstein seemed like a no-brainer, as Einstein is one of the most well-known scientists in the world,” says Caroline Brettell, SMU Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Ruth Collins Altshuler Director of the DCII. “People should understand how transformative his theory was at the time he discovered it.”

The event is free and open to the public, though space is limited. RSVP’s are requested at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/godbey-lecture-series-spring-2016-tickets-20759982667. READ MORE

Representing the Self: From Literary Discourse to Visual Artifacts

Event Date: Friday, Febuary 12, 2016
Time: 4:30 p.m.
Location: Owen Fine Arts Center 1060

Dancygier photo[1]Join guest lecturer Barbara Dancygier of the University of British Columbia as she lectures on the self. For more information visit http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events.

Academic Publishing in the 21st Century: A Roundtable Discussion

Event date: Tuesday, February 9, 2016
Time: 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. with Refreshments
Location: McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall

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How should you package and disseminate your ideas for widest readership and maximum impact? How are digital platforms and the Internet changing the nature of publishing? Join us for a roundtable discussion on the opportunities and the challenges of academic publishing in the 21st century. Please RSVP at http://publishingin21stcentury.eventbrite.com 214-768-3527. For more information visit http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Events

Health & Society student wins UT Southwestern research competition

Originally Posted: January 25, 2016

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Congratulations to Katie Logsdon

 

Health & Society Major, Winner of the 5th Annual UT Southwestern Office of Global Health Conference Student Research Competition

The conference and competition was held January 22-23 at UTSW, T. Boone Pickens Biomedical Building Auditorium in Dallas, Texas. Students from North Texas presented research in global health to a globally oriented audience and panel of global health experts. Presentations were judged by a panel including UTSW faculty members and featured speakers. Competing against 1st through 4th year medical students, Katie’s presentation on “Perception of Pain in Childbirth Pain in Dutch Women” shared data from her Richter-Funded pilot study in The Netherlands. She returns to The Netherlands Summer 2016 to complete her Distinction research project.

More information on Health and Society.

Anthropology Graduate Student Shay Cannedy and four of her peers to organize SMU’s first Refugee and Forced Migration Symposium

SMU NEWS
Originally Posted: January 20, 2016

DALLAS (SMU)Whether the topic is immigrants from Mexico or refugees from Syria, much of public opinion on these complex issues appears driven by emotion rather than fact. That’s what prompted SMU Anthropology Graduate Student Shay Cannedy and four of her peers to organize SMU’s first Refugee and Forced Migration Symposium, which will feature a renowned refugee expert and a Syrian refugee living in Dallas.

David W Haines

The symposium, “Whose Protection? Interrogating Displacement and the Limits of Humanitarian Welcome,” is open to the public Thursday and Friday, Jan. 28-29, in room 144 of Annette Caldwell Simmons Hall on SMU’s campus.

Delivering the symposium’s keynote address is George Mason University Professor David Haines, a renowned expert on refugee resettlement in the United States. Haines’ lecture, “Remembering refugees,” will be presented at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 28 in Simmons 144, following a 30-minute reception that starts at 5 p.m.

The symposium will continue from 3-5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 29, also in Simmons 144, with remarks from Syrian refugee Ghada Mukdad and presentations from SMU graduate students.

Mukdad, who was stranded in the U.S. when the outbreak of civil war prevented her from returning home in 2012, will speak about the conflict in Syria and her own legal struggles to gain official refugee status. Ghada is the founder of the Zain Foundation, a global human rights advocacy group, and an advisory board member of the Syrian Civil Coalition, which advocates for the victims of Syria’s refugee crisis.

Cannedy and fellow graduate students Katherine Fox, Sara Mosher, Ashvina Patel and Carrie Perkins will each present a lecture based on their own research into refugee issues around the world, ranging from Thailand to San Francisco

“Given current large-scale refugee movements in Europe and the Syrian refugee controversies in Texas, we thought a symposium would be a good way to open discussion on the topic and bring forth something from our own research,” Cannedy says. “A lot of countries are rethinking their migration policies and how we treat asylum seekers, so it’s on the forefront of people’s minds right now.”

Find details on the Jan. 29 portion of the symposium here. RSVPs for both days of the symposium are requested at scannedy@mail.smu.edu.

“Forced migration movements are global,” Cannedy says. “People seeking protection don’t only arrive on the doorstep of the U.S., but are also handled by developing countries.” By examining global trends in how various nations react to migration and refugee challenges, Cannedy believes the United States can develop a strategy that works best for its own concerns and needs.

“Some people view refugees and migrants as more of a security issue than a human rights issue,” Cannedy says. “But the new Canadian administration, for example, emphasizes making a compassionate welcome rather than closing borders, so we’ll be talking about how different migration policies impact the lives of people who come into contact with them.” READ MORE