A new senior-level Sociology course focuses on teaching and letting students practice advanced methods of research

Class members visited the Dallas City Archives in March, and city archivist John Slate, in order to learn about available documents for the class study of the availability of food in the West Dallas community.

SOCI Advanced Methods class at City of Dallas Archives, March 2015Pictured are (l to r) front: Mr. John Slate, Nicole Parmenter, Meagan Mulry, Aubrey Richardson, Kathleen Batman, Lily Morey, Ronnell Sims, MJ Padgett, Hannah Beltran. Back: Kris Weeks, Seaver Myers, Kristen Yule, Maddie Lozano, Zac Turner. Professor Nancy Campbell not pictured.

Sociology students learn about West Dallas barrios from Rosemary Hinojosa of DMAHL

Students enrolled in Sociology 4390 Advanced Methods had a unique opportunity to learn about West Dallas barrios from SMU alumni Rosemary Hinojosa. Mrs. Hinojosa currently works with DMAHL, Dallas Mexican-American Historical League, to preserve the rich culture and history of the West Dallas barrios. Dr. Nancy Campbell designed the class to provide students with an opportunity to engage in primary data collection. The class will be offered again Fall 2015.20150325_161851

Aubrey Richardson awarded the Joseph E. Pryor Fellowship

Aubrey Richardson, double major in Sociology and Psychology, was awarded the Joseph E. Pryor Fellowship from Region II of the Alpha Chi National College Honors Society. The Pryor Fellowship is presented to a graduating senior who plans to pursue full time academic work in graduate or professional school the following year. In addition to her excellent academic record, Ms. Richardson is the President of Dedman College Ambassadors and the Mustang Fitness Club.

Congratulations to the 2015 Research Day Award Winners

Congratulations to all the Dedman College students who received 2015 Research Day awards.

The goal of Research Day  is to foster communication between students in different disciplines, give students the opportunity to present their work in a professional setting, and share the outstanding research being conducted at SMU with their peers and industry professionals from the greater Dallas community.

See the full list of Research Day Winners, 2015

YouTube Preview Image

 

Four Sociology majors inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

The Department of Sociology congratulates Marlon Carbajal, Erica Renstrom, Aubrey Richardson, and Kristen Yule for their academic accomplishments over the last four years. All four were inducted into Phi Betta Kappa honor society on March 1, 2015.

Q&A with author who’ll speak at SMU on Armenian genocide

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: March 13, 2015

When Peter Balakian was a small boy, his grandmother filled him with stories seeped in magical realism, with mysterious yet baffling lines.

“A long time ago there was and there wasn’t,” she’d say.

Perhaps his tender grandmother was just nurturing a fellow poet and soon-to-be historian of one of the great epic traumas opening the 20th century. She was a survivor of the Armenian genocide 100 years ago in April 1915.

Her grandson would eventually become her scribe, portraying her in his award-winning memoir, Black Dog of Fate.

Balakian, now a Colgate University professor, has made the genocide a key part of his life’s work as an award-winning writer, poet and genocide expert. He will talk about his work at Southern Methodist University’s Dallas Hall at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at an event sponsored by St. Sarkis Church of Carrollton and SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program.

He recently discussed his writing and more with The Dallas Morning News. READ MORE

SMU scholarship named after Santos Rodriguez, 12-year-old killed in ’73 by Dallas cop

Dallas Morning News, The Scoop Blog

DIANNE SOLÍS
Published: March 11, 2015 3:50 pm

Santoss77

A Southern Methodist University scholarship will offered in the name of Santos Rodriguez, a 12-year-old boy killed in July 1973 by a Dallas police officer in a horrific episode in the city’s history.

The young boy’s death caused fury and protests in Dallas, particularly among Mexican-Americans. The scholarship seeks to dignify his life and the impact on Dallas.

“The Santos Rodriguez Memorial Scholarship will celebrate the life of this young boy by providing other young persons with an opportunity that he never had – the opportunity for a college education,” reads the SMU website on the scholarship announced today. “It will also dignify the memory of July 24, 1973 by perpetually transforming the terrible injustice of that day into a positive force for change.”

One requirement for the scholarship: The student major in human rights at SMU. SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program is one of seven U.S. universities offering such a bachelor’s degree.

The first scholarship will be for $10,000 and available for the 2015-2016 year, SMU officials said.

“Our intention, on behalf of the program, is to revive the historical memory of Santos,” said Roberto Corona, community outreach coordinator for the Embrey Human Rights Program. “We hope new generations know who Santos was and how he was murdered and we also want to create this opportunity that maybe Santos could have had–to go to college and study.”

Rodriguez and his then-13-year-old brother David were taken from their home just north of downtown Dallas in the middle of the night by police officer Darrell Cain. Shoeless and in handcuffs, the boys were questioned in a police car about a theft of change from a soda machine at a nearby gas station. Then the officer placed the trigger of his revolver near the temple of Santos in Russian roulette-style questioning. The trigger was pulled. Santos died instantly.

Later, fingerprints at the robbery scene didn’t match up with the boys.

Cain was indicted–a rare occurrence for a police officer. When the police officer was sentenced to five years, protests again erupted in Dallas. Cain served about half his prison sentence.

Last year, some four decades later, a Dallas County grand jury indicted another Dallas police officer in connection with an on-duty police shooting. READ MORE

Read more about the Santos Rodriguez Memorial Scholarship

Read SMU’s press release announcing the Santos Rodriguez Memorial Scholarship

Students Travel To Selma For 50th Anniversary Of Civil Rights Marches

KERA

Originally Published: March 7, 2015

group_pic

Today, March 7, marks the 50th anniversary of a bloody milestone in the Civil Rights Movement – when marchers in Selma, Alabama were attacked by police on the Edmund Pettus Bridge. On Friday, a busload from SMU began retracing the route a group of students, faculty and staff took a half century ago. LISTEN

 

SMU Students Mark History Milestone With Trip To Selma

CBS DFW

Originally Published: March 6, 2015

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – They are marching back in history to mark a major milestone. Students from Southern Methodist University loaded into buses Friday and set off — bound for Selma, Alabama.

They know it will be an emotional trip and it’s one they’ve planned for more than a year.
There are 36 students and four adults on their way to Selma. The group is largely made up of young people with majors in Human Rights and Anthropology – majors that are a part of part SMU’s political science department.

But the pilgrimage wasn’t by exclusive invitation; it was also offered to all students at SMU.

LaQuencia Dorsey’s grandmother was among the thousands who participated in the march from Selma to Montgomery 50 years ago.

“It’s going to be an emotional roller coaster for me,” she said. “Especially [since], my grandmother was part of it as well. It’s really unique for me to be able to touch the bridge, to actually feel where things happened.”

Facilitator Ray Jordan explained that the American civil rights movement and the experience of events in Selma aren’t mutually exclusive to African Americans. “It’s incredibly important that this becomes American history,” he explained. “Sometimes it’s segregated or sectioned into Black History, but this is the history of our country.”
Unlike those who made the trip from SMU in 1965, those who left on Friday are not afraid for their safety.

It was 50 years ago, on the eve of his bus ride to Montgomery that retired SMU Professor Kenneth Shields says a group of African American janitors came to his door. He recalled, “They said, ‘you don’t realize the dangers you are going into.’”

Shields explained that he and the others who left from SMU 50 years ago were motivated by what happened on Bloody Sunday. “I have always felt an identification and empathy for people who are marginalized.”

Friday Shields was there to help send off the next generation of activists. “I wish very much that I could be going along with you,” he told the group.

On March 25, 1965, Professor Shields says he marched next to a girl who could’ve been more than 14-years-old.

“She was still bandaged from being beaten on Bloody Sunday. And I said, ‘what do you think of the sheriff and the people who beat up on you?’ And she said, ‘I love them.’”
The group traveling then found that advice from janitors proved to have merit. In 1965, the bus company provided box lunches for the marching students’ ride home. When they opened them they found them full of garbage.

The 2015 group will reach Jackson, Mississippi Friday night and will be in Selma by Saturday morning. READ MORE