The SMU Geothermal Laboratory will host their 9th international energy conference and workshop, Power Plays: Drilling Into Geothermal Applications, Jan. 10-11

Event Date: January 10-11, 2018 Location: SMU Dallas Campus The conference will advance the understanding of geothermal resources in conjunction with waste-heat and direct-use applications, providing attendees with strategies for developing clean energy. Go here for more information: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Academics/Programs/GeothermalLab/Conference

By | 2018-01-08T18:01:44+00:00 January 5th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on The SMU Geothermal Laboratory will host their 9th international energy conference and workshop, Power Plays: Drilling Into Geothermal Applications, Jan. 10-11

In the Bones of a Buried Child, Signs of a Massive Human Migration to the Americas

New York Times Originally Posted: January 3, 2018 From SMU Department of Anthropology: David J. Meltzer's latest collaborative research covered by the New York Times. The girl was just six weeks old when she died. Her body was buried on a bed of antler points and red ocher, and she lay undisturbed for 11,500 years. Archaeologists discovered her in an ancient burial pit in Alaska in 2010, and on Wednesday an international team of scientists reported they had retrieved the child’s genome from her remains. The second-oldest human genome ever found in North America, it sheds new light on how people — among them the ancestors of living Native Americans — first arrived in the Western Hemisphere. The analysis, published in the journal Nature, shows [...]

By | 2018-01-04T07:00:57+00:00 January 4th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on In the Bones of a Buried Child, Signs of a Massive Human Migration to the Americas

BioLum Sciences named one of the most innovative startups of 2017 by PM360

Congrats! SMU alums Edward Allegra, Miguel Quimbar and Jack Reynolds, co-founders of BioLum Sciences, honored by PM360 magazine as one of 14 most innovative startups in 2017 For Release on Dec 18, 2017 DALLAS, TX, December 18, 2017 - PM360, a leading trade magazine for marketing decision makers in the pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, and diagnostics industries, has named BioLum Sciences as one of the most innovative Startups of 2017. BioLum Sciences’s device allows asthmatics to monitor the presence and severity of lung stress, ultimately enabling them to personalize treatment plans and reduce costly asthmatic episodes. Patients can analyze their breath with BioLum’s device and receive a reading that indicates the presence and severity of their airway inflammation in less than 2 minutes. BioLum Sciences [...]

By | 2018-01-03T14:24:51+00:00 January 3rd, 2018|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on BioLum Sciences named one of the most innovative startups of 2017 by PM360

Jeffrey Engel, Center for Presidential History, for Trump, a year of reinventing the presidency

NY Times Originally Posted: Jan. 1, 2018 FOR TRUMP, A YEAR OF REINVENTING THE PRESIDENCY In ways that were once unimaginable, President Trump has discarded the conventions and norms established by his predecessors. Will that change the institution permanently? WASHINGTON — When President Trump meets with aides to discuss policy or prepare for a speech, he may ask about the pros and cons of a new proposal. He may inquire about its possible effect. He may explore the best way to frame his case. But there is one thing he almost never does. “He very seldom asks how other presidents did this,” said John F. Kelly, the White House chief of staff. Mr. Trump is the 45th president of the United States, but he has spent much of his first [...]

By | 2018-01-03T11:30:04+00:00 January 3rd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeffrey Engel, Center for Presidential History, for Trump, a year of reinventing the presidency

Lynn Stokes, Statistics, helping the U.S. Department of Commerce count red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico

Dallas Innovates Originally Posted: December 29, 2017 SMU STATISTICIAN AIDS IN RED FISH ABUNDANCE STUDY An SMU statistician is part of a research team assembled by the U.S. Department of Commerce to conduct an independent abundance assessment of red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico, a vital member of the gulf’s fisheries. Lynne Stokes Lynne Stokes is taking part of the expert team of government and university scientists who will determine how abundant the fish is in the gulf. “Red snapper have great economic value to all the gulf states,” Stokes said. “Maintaining the health of the species is vitally important, so it’s necessary to ensure species are fished at the right level.” Stokes is an expert in surveys, polls, and sampling, and SMU said [...]

By | 2018-01-03T11:24:53+00:00 January 3rd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Statistical Science|Comments Off on Lynn Stokes, Statistics, helping the U.S. Department of Commerce count red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico

How a Crystal-Covered Ball Became a Symbol of the New Year

Artsy Originally Posted: December 28, 2017 Certain things happen, like clockwork, at the stroke of midnight every New Year’s Eve. Noisemakers blare; your glitter-coated party hat begins to shed; and an 11,875-pound ball covered in 2,688 Waterford Crystals descends down a flagpole in the middle of New York’s Times Square. While the crystals are a relatively new addition, the ball’s relationship with time goes way back. In 1829, a British Royal Navy captain named Robert Wauchope created “time balls” to help ship captains keep more precise time. Located near harbors, these balls—initially red and made of leather and wood—would be lowered each day at 1 p.m. (or earlier, at noon, in the United States, where the first time ball appeared in 1845). Thus, sailors had [...]

By | 2018-01-03T11:22:16+00:00 January 3rd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on How a Crystal-Covered Ball Became a Symbol of the New Year

Robert Jordan, Political Science, lends expertise on CNBC

CNBC Originally Posted: December 27, 2017 Saudi crown prince's lavish buys: Some see hypocrisy, others say they're no big deal Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has been linked to multimillion-dollar purchases of artwork, real estate and yachts. Some warn the purchases send the wrong signal at a time when the powerful crown prince is spearheading an anti-corruption campaign. Others say the purchases have nothing to do with the crackdown and many Saudis aren't bothered by Crown Prince Mohammed's spending. A series of recent reports have connected Saudi Arabia's powerful crown prince — an avowed anti-corruption crusader — to lavish real estate, art and yacht purchases. To some, the spending is a sign of hypocrisy and a threat to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's legitimacy. [...]

By | 2018-01-02T08:27:23+00:00 January 2nd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science, Tower Center|Comments Off on Robert Jordan, Political Science, lends expertise on CNBC

Investing in a data-empowered future

SMU Magazine Originally Posted: December 5, 2017 SMU is eager to serve and partner with Dallas, just as Northwestern University serves Chicago and Columbia University serves New York. We are ready to leverage SMU’s academic vitality and strong relationships with the Dallas region for expanded community service and impact. Dallas is a city in a hurry, taking its place as a global business and knowledge center. Major corporations like Toyota and (perhaps) Amazon recognize that Dallas has a stake in the tech-driven future. What you need to know is that SMU has skin in that game. We are a 21st century university, data empowered and actively seeking solutions to societal problems through interdisciplinary collaborations between the humanities, the sciences, the arts and the world of [...]

Cities, Suburbs, and the New America event features high profile speakers

SMU Video Originally Posted: November 15, 2017 SMU-Cox Folsom Institute for Real Estate, the SMU Economics Center, and the Center for Opportunity Urbanism presented a lively discussion on Cities, Suburbs, and the New America, and Minorities, Immigrants, and Millennials in America’s Favorite Geography. The event featured presentations from former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Henry Cisneros, author Joel Kotkin, and MIT Professor Alan Berger. WATCH https://youtu.be/F8Jdp0zfjes  

By | 2017-12-06T10:49:26+00:00 December 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Cities, Suburbs, and the New America event features high profile speakers

Top 10 Dedman College Faculty Research Articles

  Sapiens: Can Medical Anthropology Solve the Diabetes Dilemma? As the number of sufferers continues to rise, some researchers are moving in new directions to figure out how culture and lifestyle shape disease outcomes. LiveScience: Newfound dino looks like creepy love child of a turkey and ostrich A new giant bird-like dinosaur discovered in China has been named for SMU paleontologist Louis L. Jacobs, Corythoraptor jacobsi, by the scientists who identified the new oviraptorid. Cosmos: Painting with light in three dimensions A new technique uses photoswitch molecules to create three-dimensional images from pure light. SMU Guildhall and cancer researchers level up to tap human intuition of video gamers in quest to beat cancer Massive computational power of online “Minecraft” gaming community bests supercomputers.  Nation’s electric grid [...]

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