SMU alum moves company headquarters to Houston, announce residency at the world’s largest medical complex

PR Log Originally Posted: July 25, 2018 Edward Allegra, co-founder and CEO of BioLum Sciences graduated from SMU in 2014 with degrees in biology and economics. BioLum Sciences Announces Residency at JLABS @ TMC BioLum Sciences is pleased to announce residency at Johnson & Johnson Innovation, JLABS at the Texas Medical Center (JLABS @ TMC) - the world's largest medical complex. As a result, BioLum has relocated its company headquarters from Dallas, TX to Houston, TX. "The TMC ecosystem provides us with numerous opportunities for collaborations and partnerships that will undoubtedly play key roles in the commercialization of our technology," said Edward Allegra, co-founder and CEO of BioLum Sciences. "We couldn't be more excited to be surrounded by other startups and industry leaders who are at [...]

By | 2018-08-02T08:52:11+00:00 July 31st, 2018|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics, Graduate News|Comments Off on SMU alum moves company headquarters to Houston, announce residency at the world’s largest medical complex

Former Clements Fellow Andrew Torget prepares to break a Guinness World Record in teaching the longest lesson

Chronicle of Higher Education Originally Posted: July 26, 2018 On August 24 at 9 a.m., Andrew Torget will take the podium in a University of North Texas auditorium, clad in a suit and armed with 500 pages of notes. Forty-five students will be seated in front of him, notebooks — no laptops! — at the ready. He’ll open his notes, clear his throat, and begin his lecture. If he’s going to successfully teach the longest recorded history class ever, he won’t be able to stop, aside from occasional brief breaks, for the next 30 hours. At least 10 of his students will have to stick it out, too. Torget, an associate professor of history at North Texas, is gunning for an official Guinness World Record — for [...]

By | 2018-07-27T08:27:11+00:00 July 27th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Graduate News, History|Comments Off on Former Clements Fellow Andrew Torget prepares to break a Guinness World Record in teaching the longest lesson

Newsweek: Bodies of 95 Forced Labors Uncovered During Texas School District Construction Project

Newsweek Originally Posted: July 19, 2018 Dr. Catrina Whitley, Gwen Bakke, and Abigail Fisher are working on a historic African American cemetery in Houston. Dr. Whitley is a Dedman College alumna and a former adjunct lecturer in the Department of Anthropology. Gwen Bakke and Abigail Fisher are SMU anthropology Ph.D. students. A school district in Texas unearthed a long-forgotten cemetery, during a construction project, which archaeologists now believe contains the bodies of black forced-labor prisoners. The remains of 95 people were discovered in February in the city Sugar Land, just southwest of Houston. This week, researchers announced the bodies likely belonged to black people who were working in forced-labor camps, at a moment in history, between 1878 and 1910, when slavery had already been abolished. The discovery was made [...]

By | 2018-07-27T07:55:19+00:00 July 27th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Newsweek: Bodies of 95 Forced Labors Uncovered During Texas School District Construction Project

Two SMU Graduate Students Named Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellows

Dedman College News Originally Posted: July 26, 2018 The Dallas-Fort Worth Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (ASF), housed in Dedman College, announced the selection of its fourth cohort of Schweitzer Fellows, and two SMU students have been awarded this prestigious Fellowship and will spend the next year learning to effectively address the social factors that impact health and developing lifelong leadership skills. In doing so, they will follow the example set by famed physician-humanitarian Albert Schweitzer, for whom their Fellowship is named. Vanessa Uzoh The Schweitzer Fellows from SMU bring unique skills and insights to the Fellowship, illustrating the interdisciplinary nature of the program. Vanessa Uzoh, ’13,  currently pursuing an MS in Health Promotion Management, is addressing nutrition and a lack of physical activity. Partnering [...]

By | 2018-07-26T11:07:25+00:00 July 26th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Two SMU Graduate Students Named Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellows

Ancient American farmers supplemented poor diet through fungus infection

COSMOS Originally Posted: July 18, 2018 A mystery concerning how some of North America’s first farmers survived on a diet that appears manifestly inadequate may have been solved. The ancestral Pueblo people who lived in what is now known as the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States shifted from a nomadic to a settled lifestyle centred on crop-growing around 400BCE. The primary crop cultivated was maize (known in the US as corn), which accounted for an estimated 80% of calorific intake. During the ensuing 800 years – a stretch known as the Basketmaker II period – the settlers’ diet contained very little meat. This was perhaps a cultural choice. Basketmaker II people became efficient turkey farmers, but the birds were raised primarily for [...]

By | 2018-07-24T08:24:12+00:00 July 24th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Ancient American farmers supplemented poor diet through fungus infection

Native bison hunters amplified climate impacts on North American prairie fires

Eureka Alert Originally Posted: July 23, 2018 Study shows hunter-gatherers used active burning to improve grazing, drive bison, long before arrival of Columbus DALLAS (SMU) - Native American communities actively managed North American prairies for centuries before Christopher Columbus' arrival in the New World, according to a new study led by Southern Methodist University (SMU) archaeologist Christopher I. Roos. Fire was an important indigenous tool for shaping North American ecosystems, but the relative importance of indigenous burning versus climate on fire patterns remains controversial in scientific communities. The new study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), documents the use of fire to manipulate bison herds in the northern Great Plains. Contrary to popular thinking, burning by indigenous hunters combined with climate variability to [...]

By | 2018-07-23T19:20:53+00:00 July 23rd, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Native bison hunters amplified climate impacts on North American prairie fires

‘Our Trayvon Martin’: Santos Rodriguez documentary tells story of boy murdered by white Dallas cop

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: July 18, 2018 Click here to learn more about the Santos Rodriguez Memorial Endowed Scholarship which promotes Human Rights education for emerging leaders and honors the memory of a young boy whose life ended far too soon. Documentary filmmaker Byron Hunter wants to make sure younger generations know crucial elements of Dallas Latino history. He points to the rise and fall of Little Mexico, the significance of Pike Park and the tragic murder of 12-year-old Santos Rodriguez, who was killed Russian-roulette-style by a white Dallas police officer. Hunter, who grew up in Dallas, said he wants to use the upcoming 45th anniversary of Rodriguez’s death as a teachable moment for the community. His latest documentary, Santos Vive, is set to release next [...]

By | 2018-07-20T08:06:25+00:00 July 20th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Events, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on ‘Our Trayvon Martin’: Santos Rodriguez documentary tells story of boy murdered by white Dallas cop

Bodies exhumed from unmarked cemetery in Texas

CBS News Originally Posted: July 18, 2018 Dr. Catrina Whitley, Gwen Bakke, and Abigail Fisher are working on a historic African American cemetery in Houston. Dr. Whitley is a Dedman College alumna and a former adjunct lecturer in the Department of Anthropology. Gwen Bakke and Abigail Fisher are SMU anthropology Ph.D. students. Ninety-five sets of remains found have been found at a site in Texas. Dr. Catrina Banks Whitley says the remains she studied were all African-American, and it is believed they were prison inmates leased by the state to plantation owners after the emancipation of slaves. KHOU-TV reports from Sugar Land, Texas. WATCH https://youtu.be/jUznbz1YmrI  

By | 2018-07-20T07:35:20+00:00 July 19th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Bodies exhumed from unmarked cemetery in Texas

Remains of Black People Forced Into Labor After Slavery Are Discovered in Texas

New York Times Originally Posted: July 18, 2018 Dr. Catrina Whitley, Gwen Bakke, and Abigail Fisher are working on a historic African American cemetery in Houston. Dr. Whitley is a Dedman College  alumna and a former adjunct lecturer in the Department of Anthropology. Gwen Bakke and Abigail Fisher are SMU anthropology Ph.D. students. Below is an article describing their findings in the July 18th issue of the New York Times. More information about their research can be found in the Washington Post. ------------------------------------------------------------------------- The remains of dozens of people found at a construction site in Texas this year are mostly likely those of African-Americans who were forced to work on a plantation there around the turn of the 20th century, officials said this week. That finding, [...]

By | 2018-07-20T07:36:09+00:00 July 18th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Remains of Black People Forced Into Labor After Slavery Are Discovered in Texas

A Scientist’s Voyage From the Peruvian Amazon to Nordic Iceland

National Geographic Originally Posted: July 13, 2018   Andrés Ruzo is a graduate student in Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Geothermal scientist Andrés Ruzo is a restless spirit whose passion for science and adventure inspire him to always go further, dig deeper, and discover what’s next. In celebration of his thirst for endless exploration, National Geographic and Coors Light launched Ruzo on an epic journey and invited him to share his experiences with other explorers. In the first of four photo essays, follow Ruzo as he prepares for his trip and talks about what sparked his interest in the wild, rugged, and cold land of fire and ice—Iceland. Childhood experiences—like playing on volcanoes and hearing the legend of Peru's Boiling River (above)—sparked Andrés [...]

By | 2018-07-16T08:01:48+00:00 July 16th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on A Scientist’s Voyage From the Peruvian Amazon to Nordic Iceland
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