Maria Richards of SMU takes over Presidency at Geothermal Resources Council

Think GeoEnergy Originally Posted: January 26, 2017   The Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) has welcomed Maria Richards as the 26th President of the global geothermal energy organization, succeeding Paul Brophy. Maria Richards, SMUMaria Richards is the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Geothermal Laboratory Coordinator in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in Dallas, Texas. Her research is on geothermal resources and energy development. Maria’s previous projects include updating the Geothermal Map of North America, developing temperature maps for Google.org, and on?site geothermal exploration in the Peruvian Amazon and the Northern Mariana Islands. Producing geothermal energy from oil and gas fields is one of her research goals, thus works directly with technology companies and the oil and gas industry to find overlapping opportunities. As an [...]

By | January 26th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Maria Richards of SMU takes over Presidency at Geothermal Resources Council

Danila Serra, Economics, Does Corruption Happen Slowly, or All at Once?

The Atlantic Originally Posted: January 26, 2017 If someone’s about to go into a cold swimming pool, they’ll probably use one of two tactics. They might dip a toe in, wade in to the ankles, and slowly, slowly inch their body into the water until they’re completely submerged. Or they’ll just cannonball in, and get it over with. If it’s not a cold swimming pool someone is entering, but rather the icy waters of corruption, which of these two strategies will they choose? Many would say the first; corruption is often characterized as a “slippery slope,” something into which a person or organization slowly descends as more and more small immoral acts add up. But a new study published in Psychological Science argues that people are more likely to [...]

By | January 26th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Danila Serra, Economics, Does Corruption Happen Slowly, or All at Once?

SMU Tower Center & Latino CLD award nine new research grants to help Latino communities, inspire policy change

SMU News Originally Posted: January 24, 2017 The Latino Center for Leadership Development (Latino CLD) and SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies have awarded nine grants to 13 scholars tapped to provide meaningful research geared to promoting a stronger understanding of the Latino community and creating a dialogue about key societal issues. As the Tower Center–Latino CLD partnership’s first class of grant recipients, each research team will provide final reports that include a white paper with context, analysis and policy recommendations. Awards were chosen by research grant advisory board members Miguel Solis, Latino CLD president; James Hollifield, SMU Tower Center academic director; and Alicia Reyes-Barriéntez and Aileen Cardona-Arroyo, SMU Tower Center postdoctoral fellows. “Issuing these grants marks the beginning of a new approach to policy and research related [...]

By | January 25th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Tower Center, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on SMU Tower Center & Latino CLD award nine new research grants to help Latino communities, inspire policy change

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner T.J. Stiles visits SMU

Event date: Tuesday, January 24, 2017 Time: 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm Location: SMU, McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall This event is cosponsored with SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies. Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner T.J. Stiles argues that one of the great turning points in the life of George Armstrong Custer came in Texas in 1865–66. Here he faced the meaning of emancipation and Union victory in the Civil War. It led him to campaign alongside President Andrew Johnson in the historic midterm election of 1866, battling the Fourteenth Amendment, black enfranchisement, and Radical Reconstruction. Politics first made Custer controversial, Stiles argues, even before he joined the wars with the Cheyennes and Lakotas on the Great Plains. The result was a personal crisis amid a Republican [...]

By | January 24th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner T.J. Stiles visits SMU

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Trump’s Inauguration Day: beyond the pageantry, after the boycotts

Christian Science Monitor Originally Posted: January 20, 2017 It’s show time. The bands are tuning up, revelers and protesters alike are ready with their signs and their voices, and Donald Trump – businessman, showman, political maverick – is about to step into the role of a lifetime. At noon on Friday, Mr. Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, the next stage in a journey as improbable as any in American politics. Just as eight years ago, when Barack Obama carried the hopes of millions into office with him, so too does the larger-than-life Trump. But the notes of discord are much louder. Political polarization has only grown deeper, and shows no sign of abating. Trump enters office the [...]

By | January 23rd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Cal Jillson, Political Science, Trump’s Inauguration Day: beyond the pageantry, after the boycotts

Request for Proposals for Annual Fellows Seminar, 2017-2018

The Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute is now soliciting proposals from faculty for an Annual Fellows Seminar for the 2017-2018 Academic Year. For application details, please see: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Programs/AnnualFellowsSeminars. Deadline is March 3rd, 2017.

By | January 18th, 2017|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Request for Proposals for Annual Fellows Seminar, 2017-2018

The danger of Trump’s tweets

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: January 17, 2017 About the Author: Robert J. Howell is Dedman Family Distinguished Professor of Philosophy in SMU's Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.  He earned his Ph.D. in philosophy from Brown University and joined SMU in 2002.  His areas of specialization are philosophy of the mind, epistemology and metaphysics. Howell was featured in a fall 2016 program hosted by SMU's Center for Presidential History titled, "Are We Too Dumb for Democracy?" I don't think we should worry too much about Meryl Streep. Her cred can withstand some silly tweets from our President-elect, and she has chosen to live in the public eye. But this recent episode of twitter abuse is merely the tip of the iceberg and we need to [...]

By | January 17th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Philosophy|Comments Off on The danger of Trump’s tweets

Congratulations to NEH grant recipient Sabri Ates!

SMU News Originally Posted: January 17, 2017 The National Endowment for the Humanities named SMU professors Zachary Wallmark and Sabri Ates as fellowship grant recipients in January – the only two recipients in North Texas for the current funding cycle. Wallmark, assistant professor and chair of music history at SMU Meadows School of the Arts, is using music studies, cognitive sciences and original brain imaging experiments to research the nature of our emotional response to music. “I am deeply honored to receive this recognition,” Wallmark said. “With the support of the NEH, I hope in my work to help people better understand music’s grip on human emotion and imagination.” Ates, associate professor in the Clements Department of History, is drawing on a variety of archival [...]

By | January 17th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Congratulations to NEH grant recipient Sabri Ates!

Joshua Rovner, Tower Center, Here’s Why Trump’s Intel Bashing Matters

Defense One Originally Posted: January 9, 2017 The president-elect’s denigration of the Russian hacking findings will make it harder to make a case against other U.S. adversaries, former officials say. President-elect Donald Trump’s public bashing of the intelligence community could drive some agents and analysts away from their jobs, degrading the community’s overall capabilities, former officials tells Nextgov. The public discord could also drive a wedge between intelligence gatherers and the man who will soon be their consumer in chief, eroding the intelligence community’s typical role as a check on the presumptions and preconceived notions of policymakers, analysts say. “My impression is morale has taken a hit,” said Joel Brenner, a former National Security Agency senior counsel. “When the president of the United States disparages your work, demeans [...]

By | January 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Tower Center|Comments Off on Joshua Rovner, Tower Center, Here’s Why Trump’s Intel Bashing Matters
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