NASA Scientists Discover 7 New Earth-Sized Planets

Fox4 Originally Posted: February 22, 2017 Dr. Robert Kehoe, Professor of Physics, is a special guest on Fox4 News. The Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these planets are firmly located in an area called the habitable zone, where liquid water is most likely to exist on a rocky planet. Watch

By | February 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on NASA Scientists Discover 7 New Earth-Sized Planets

KERA Think: SMU History Professor Talks About The Russian Revolution

KERA Think Originally Posted: February 22, 2017 One hundred years ago this month, the Russian Empire collapsed with the abdication of Emperor Nicholas II. Daniel Orlovsky, George Bouhe Research Fellow in Russian Studies at SMU, and Boris Kolonitsky, Russian Revolution History Chair at the European University in St Petersburg, Russia, join us to talk about how the Russian Revolution brought about the Soviet Union and eventually the Russia of today. They’ll speak at “The Russian Revolution of 1917: A Centennial View,” a symposium at SMU. READ MORE

By | February 22nd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on KERA Think: SMU History Professor Talks About The Russian Revolution

Dr. Jeff Engel, Director of the Center for Presidential History, appears on Good Day to talk about challenges facing the Trump administration

Fox4 Originally Posted: February 20, 2017 The first 100 days: Trump vs the press. Watch  

By | February 21st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Dr. Jeff Engel, Director of the Center for Presidential History, appears on Good Day to talk about challenges facing the Trump administration

New delta Scuti: Rare pulsating star 7,000 light years away is 1 of only 7 in Milky Way

EurekaAlert! Originally Posted: February 14, 2017 Astronomers are reporting a rare star as big -- or bigger -- than the Earth's sun and that is expanding and contracting in a unique pattern in three different directions. The star is one that pulsates and so is characterized by varying brightness over time. It's situated 7,000 light years away from the Earth in the constellation Pegasus, said astronomer Farley Ferrante, a member of the team that made the discovery at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Called a variable star, this particular star is one of only seven known stars of its kind in our Milky Way galaxy. "It was challenging to identify it," Ferrante said. "This is the first time we'd encountered this rare type." The Milky Way [...]

By | February 15th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on New delta Scuti: Rare pulsating star 7,000 light years away is 1 of only 7 in Milky Way

Watches were once considered a ‘silly a– fad’ — here’s what that could say about their future

Business Insider Originally posted: February 7, 2017 Wristwatches have been commonplace for nearly everyone alive today. It was hard to imagine a world where most people — both men and women — didn't have a watch mounted on their wrist. A future where we learn the time from glancing at our phones and not our wrists was inconceivable. But that certainly seems to be the future we're heading towards. And, historically, it's not an inconceivable one. Watches, when they were first being worn on the wrist in the early 1900s, were not considered to be a serious trend, and were instead worn by jokesters and Vaudeville artists. A 1916 New York Times article even referred to wristwatches as a "silly a-- fad." At the time, both gentlemen [...]

By | February 9th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Watches were once considered a ‘silly a– fad’ — here’s what that could say about their future

Joe Kobylka, Political Science, a tale of two Trump rollouts

US News and World Report Originally Posted: February 2, 2017 President Donald Trump's orderly unveiling of his Supreme Court justice selection was tip-top, combining a dash of suspense with the calm decorum such a momentous occasion merits. It was also a drastic departure from his administration's chaotic implementation of a hastily ordered travel ban applied to seven Muslim-majority countries. Within just a four-day span, Trump's White House team telegraphed what some political observers worry are its biggest weaknesses – insularity, inexperience and obstinacy – before pivoting to exude the most cherished attributes of a tightly run ship: competence, preparation and discretion. The two episodes could be held up as beaming models for how to successfully conquer a rollout versus how to clumsily botch one. The travel ban, pushed [...]

By | February 7th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Joe Kobylka, Political Science, a tale of two Trump rollouts

Matthew Wilson, Political Science, Trump’s immigration action the first stumble with GOP

Washington Examiner Originally Posted: February 1, 2017   President Trump is facing his first serious pushback from congressional Republicans since taking office as outrage swirls over his immigrationexecutive order. It isn't the full-scale retreat Trump endured during several campaign controversies, such as the release of the "Access Hollywood" tape. Most of the criticism from Republicans has been measured, especially compared to the full-throated condemnations from immigrant, human rights and progressive groups who characterize the executive order as a "Muslim ban." The most vocal Republican critics have an anti-Trump track record predating this controversy. Liberal outlets have published lists of the high number of GOP lawmakers who haven't weighed in at all. But the defections sound a rare discordant note as Republicans celebrate the dawn on their unified control of [...]

By | February 5th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Matthew Wilson, Political Science, Trump’s immigration action the first stumble with GOP

Mexico trade war would put Texas economy, jobs at stake

Dallas News Originally Posted: January 31, 2017 The Texas economy is already pretty great, and Mexico is one of the key reasons. That’s worth remembering when President Donald Trump threatens a trade war over a border wall, as he did last week. Economically, there’s more at stake for Texas than any other state in the country. Mexico is our most important trading partner by far. In 2015, Texas exported over $92 billion in goods to Mexico, which was more than it exported to the next 10 countries combined. Texas imports from Mexico were almost as high and were twice as high as from China, next on the list. Perhaps the most impressive number: Texas exports supported over 1 million jobs in 2015, according to government [...]

By | January 31st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science, Tower Center|Comments Off on Mexico trade war would put Texas economy, jobs at stake

Robert Howell, Philosophy, commentary, the prescription to cure political malpractice

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: January 28, 2017 It's time to ask: What's so great about democracy? I don't mean we should doubt that democracy is the best approach to government. I think we should remind ourselves why it is. Spoiler alert: It's not because it results in the best leaders. Democracy is valuable even if it doesn't always generate the optimal outcome. Governing ought not be done without the consent of the governed; the democratic process is the way we as a people give our consent. If a democratic government often lumbers along, therefore, with policies that are unwise and ill informed, and even when it elects leaders whose popular appeal exceeds their competence, at least it is a government that rules at the [...]

By | January 31st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Philosophy|Comments Off on Robert Howell, Philosophy, commentary, the prescription to cure political malpractice

Louis Jacobs and Mike Polcyn, Earth Sciences, set to speak this week on “The Art and Science of Texas Dinosaurs”

Baylor News Release Originally Posted: January 27, 2017 WACO, Texas (Jan. 27, 2017) – The Mayborn Museum Complex is hosting experts who will deliver lectures during a Director’s Forum on “The Art and Science of Texas Dinosaurs” Thursday, Feb. 2, and Friday, Feb. 3. The Director’s Forum is an annual lecture series at the museum intended for an adult audience. This year’s forum will feature talks by three speakers at the Mayborn Museum Complex, 1300 S. University Parks Drive. Louis Jacobs, Ph.D., will lecture on "Lone Star Dinosaurs: An Update on the State" at 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Jacobs is a professor in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences at Southern Methodist University and president of the Institute for the Study of Earth and [...]

By | January 31st, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Louis Jacobs and Mike Polcyn, Earth Sciences, set to speak this week on “The Art and Science of Texas Dinosaurs”
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