Congratulations Caroline Brettell, Anthropology, Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

American Academy of Arts and Sciences Originally Posted: April 12, 2017 American Academy of Arts and Sciences Elects 228 National and International Scholars, Artists, Philanthropists, and Business Leaders The 237th class of members includes philanthropist and singer-songwriter John Legend, award-winning actress Carol Burnett, chairman of the board of Xerox Corporation Ursula Burns, mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani, immunologist James P. Allison, and writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Press Release CAMBRIDGE, MA | APRIL 12, 2017 — The American Academy of Arts and Sciences today announced the election of 228 new members. They include some of the world’s most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists, as well as civic, business, and philanthropic leaders. The list of the 237th class of new members is available at www.amacad.org/members. Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts [...]

By | 2017-04-12T07:31:34+00:00 April 12th, 2017|Anthropology, DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congratulations Caroline Brettell, Anthropology, Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Aspects of gorgonopsian paleobiology and evolution: insights from the basicranium, occiput, osseous labyrinth, vasculature, and neuroanatomy

PeerJ Originally Posted: April 13, 2017 SMU Earth Science professors issue new paper on "Aspects of gorgonopsian paleobiology and evolution: insights from the basicranium, occiput, osseous labyrinth, vasculature, and neuroanatomy."   Araújo R, Fernandez V, Polcyn MJ, Fröbisch J, Martins RMS. (2017) Aspects of gorgonopsian paleobiology and evolution: insights from the basicranium, occiput, osseous labyrinth, vasculature, and neuroanatomy. PeerJ5:e3119 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.3119

By | 2017-04-13T10:16:15+00:00 April 11th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on Aspects of gorgonopsian paleobiology and evolution: insights from the basicranium, occiput, osseous labyrinth, vasculature, and neuroanatomy

Congratulations Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi recently awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship

Tower Center Blog Originally Posted: April 5, 2017 Three SMU professors Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi were awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship for 2017-2018. The award, designed to increase research and scholarship and to enhance teaching effectiveness, gives SMU faculty members up to $5,000 for their research, which contributes to what President Bush referred to as the New World Order. Sabri Ates, associate professor of history, will use the award to finish writing his book Seyyid Abdulqadir Nehri’s Pursuit of an Independent Kurdistan. With the recent developments in Iraq, Syria and Turkey the question of Kurdish statelessness is becoming more pressing. Ates explores what historical conditions account for how the Kurds became the largest ethnic group without its own nation. His book [...]

By | 2017-04-11T10:02:57+00:00 April 11th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, Political Science|Comments Off on Congratulations Sabri Ates, Michael Lusztig, and Hiroki Takeuchi recently awarded the Colin Powell Global Order and Foreign Policy Fellowship

New SMU study shows just how bad helicopter parenting can be on kids years later

Austin 360 Originally Posted: April 5, 2017 Researchers at Southern Methodist University studied college age kids who were either raised by helicopter parents — those that hover over everything their kids do — as well as parents who just didn’t encourage independence. Years later, all that helicoptering you’ve done could be affecting your college-age kids. What they found was surprising because it fell on gender lines. From the study press release: The researchers found that young women are negatively affected by helicopter parenting, while young men suffer when parents don’t encourage independence. “The sex difference was surprising,” said  family dynamics expert Chrystyna Kouros, an assistant professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and an author on the study.  “In Western culture in particular, boys [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:45:26+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on New SMU study shows just how bad helicopter parenting can be on kids years later

David Millimet, Economics, A Weaker EPA May Not Mean The Environment Goes To Hell But It Could Lead To Greater Disparities Between States

FiveThirtyEight Originally Posted: April 7, 2017 Last week, President Trump signed a broad executive order that’s primarily aimed at promoting the use of coal and curbing Obama-era efforts to reduce America’s greenhouse-gas emissions. The Trump administration sees its new rules as a crucial path to creating coal-industry jobs and making America energy-independent — though economists say it’s unlikely to achieve those goals. Meanwhile, among people concerned about the risks of long-term climate change, the order has been interpreted as an attack, a dismantling of environmental protections, and an example of the president’s particular animosity toward the Environmental Protection Agency. But if Trump really does have an ax to grind with the EPA, he’s not the first world leader to sit down at that whetstone. Politicians [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:37:43+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on David Millimet, Economics, A Weaker EPA May Not Mean The Environment Goes To Hell But It Could Lead To Greater Disparities Between States

Jeffrey A. Engel, Center for Presidential History director, quoted in Boston Globe

Boston Globe Originally Posted: April 7, 2017 Trump gets needed first win with Gorsuch WASHINGTON — After 77 days in office, President Trump finally got his first legislative win on Friday. All it took was upending a Senate tradition that’s been around for two centuries. The Senate confirmed Judge Neil Gorsuch to become the newest associate justice on the Supreme Court by a vote of 54 to 45, after the elimination of the Supreme Court filibuster on Thursday — a rule that has roots in the very first Congress. The vote, installing a conservative justice to fill the vacancy left by the 2016 death of Justice Antonin Scalia, offers a rare ray of light for Trump’s nascent administration, which has gotten off to a tumultuous [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:49:44+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeffrey A. Engel, Center for Presidential History director, quoted in Boston Globe

Archaeologist explains innovation of ‘fluting’ ancient stone weaponry

Phys.org Originally Posted: April 6, 2017 Approximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years. Kent State University's Metin Eren, Ph.D., director of archaeology and assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences, and his colleagues are not only asking these questions but testing their unique new theories. They want to better understand the engineering, techniques and purposes of Clovis weapon technologies. Specifically, they study stone projectile points, such as arrowheads and spear points, [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:20:09+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Archaeologist explains innovation of ‘fluting’ ancient stone weaponry

SMU Mission Foods Texas-Mexico Center Celebrates Official Opening

SMU News Originally Posted: April 6, 2017 Last week marked the official opening of the SMU Mission Foods Texas-Mexico Center, an action-oriented, research policy center looking to understand and explore the dynamic political, cultural, economic and business relationship between Texas and Mexico. The center celebrated its opening with a private dinner April 6 and the center’s first annual symposium Friday, April 7. Geronimo Gutierrez The symposium featured a keynote luncheon address from Geronimo Gutierrez, Mexico’s ambassador to the United States. “The center will help shape important regional and national conversations on topics such as education, trade and energy – topics that impact our communities every day,” said Luisa del Rosal, founding executive director of the center. “As a research policy center, it is a place not of rhetoric, [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:12:26+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, Tower Center|Comments Off on SMU Mission Foods Texas-Mexico Center Celebrates Official Opening

ManeFrame OpenMP Deep Dive

Event Date: April 12, 2017 Location: Caruth Hall 314 Time:1:00 - 3:00 PM The Scientific Computation (CSC) spring workshop series will provide a hands-on experience that will guide researchers from the basics of using SMU’s supercomputing resources to advanced parallelization usage. New users are encouraged to take advantage of the introductory “Introduction to Research Computing” workshop that will be given once monthly during the semester. Link for more information: http://www.smu.edu/csc    

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