LISTEN: Teens In Low-Income Families Get HPV Vaccine If Parents Persuade Themselves Of Benefits

KERA Originally Posted: April 11, 2017 Guilt, social pressure and even a doctor’s recommendation aren't enough to motivate low-income families to vaccinate their teenagers for Human Papillomavirus (HPV), according to research from Southern Methodist University. But a follow-up study from SMU finds that if parents persuade themselves of the benefits of the vaccinations, more teenagers in low-income families receive protection from the sexually transmitted, cancer-causing virus. LISTEN

By | 2017-04-13T07:56:01+00:00 April 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on LISTEN: Teens In Low-Income Families Get HPV Vaccine If Parents Persuade Themselves Of Benefits

New SMU study shows just how bad helicopter parenting can be on kids years later

Austin 360 Originally Posted: April 5, 2017 Researchers at Southern Methodist University studied college age kids who were either raised by helicopter parents — those that hover over everything their kids do — as well as parents who just didn’t encourage independence. Years later, all that helicoptering you’ve done could be affecting your college-age kids. What they found was surprising because it fell on gender lines. From the study press release: The researchers found that young women are negatively affected by helicopter parenting, while young men suffer when parents don’t encourage independence. “The sex difference was surprising,” said  family dynamics expert Chrystyna Kouros, an assistant professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and an author on the study.  “In Western culture in particular, boys [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:45:26+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on New SMU study shows just how bad helicopter parenting can be on kids years later

Male and female college students react differently to misguided parenting according to a new study

SMU Research Originally Posted: April 4, 2017 Male and female college students react differently to misguided parenting, according to a new study that looked at the impact of helicopter parenting and fostering independence. Measuring both helicopter parenting as well as autonomy support — fostering independence — was important for the researchers to study, said family dynamics expert Chrystyna Kouros, an assistant professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and an author on the study. “Just because mom and dad aren’t helicopter parents, doesn’t necessarily mean they are supporting their young adult in making his or her own choices,” Kouros said. “The parent may be uninvolved, so we also wanted to know if parents are actually encouraging their student to be independent and make their [...]

By | 2017-04-04T08:33:50+00:00 April 4th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Male and female college students react differently to misguided parenting according to a new study

A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind

NPR Originally Posted: March 31, 2017 Take a deep breath in through your nose, and slowly let it out through your mouth. Do you feel calmer? Controlled breathing like this can combat anxiety, panic attacks and depression. It's one reason so many people experience tranquility after meditation or a pranayama yoga class. How exactly the brain associates slow breathing with calmness and quick breathing with nervousness, though, has been a mystery. Now, researchers say they've found the link, at least in mice. The key is a smattering of about 175 neurons in a part of the brain the researchers call the breathing pacemaker, which is a cluster of nearly 3,000 neurons that sit in the brainstem and control autonomic breathing. Through their research is in [...]

By | 2017-04-03T09:14:31+00:00 April 3rd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind

Semi Ojeleye Wins American Conference Player of the Year and Scholar-Athlete of the Year

SMU News Originally Posted: March 9, 2017 Psychology major and SMU forward Semi Ojeleye is this year’s breakout star on the men’s basketball team. The transfer from Duke leads the nationally ranked Mustangs in scoring, but his road to Dallas was not an easy one. Watch: Semi Shines at SMU

By | 2017-03-09T18:26:41+00:00 March 9th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Psychology, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Semi Ojeleye Wins American Conference Player of the Year and Scholar-Athlete of the Year

Self-persuasion iPad app spurs low-income parents to protect teens against cancer-causing hpv

Medical Xpress Originally Posted: March 7, 2017 As health officials struggle to boost the number of teens vaccinated against the deadly human papillomavirus, a new study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, found that self-persuasion works to bring parents on board. Currently public health efforts rely on educational messages and doctor recommendations to persuade parents to vaccinate their adolescents. Self-persuasion as a tool for HPV vaccinations has never been researched until now. The SMU study found that low-income parents will decide to have their teens vaccinated against the sexually transmitted cancer-causing virus if the parents persuade themselves of the protective benefits. The study's subjects—almost all moms—were taking their teens and pre-teens to a safety-net pediatric clinic for medical care. It's the first to look at changing [...]

By | 2017-03-08T07:42:00+00:00 March 8th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Self-persuasion iPad app spurs low-income parents to protect teens against cancer-causing hpv

#MustangsGiveBack is TODAY! Support Dedman College!

What will you support at SMU? Make a gift on March 7, 2017, and be a part of Mustangs Give Back, our annual one-day giving challenge. Here are some of the Dedman College projects on the #MustangsGiveBack list: Bring International Film Festival to Campus: SMU's spring international film festival brings the best of foreign cinema to campus. Films from the Arab world, Africa, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Spain, and many other countries and regions are screened at no cost to students or the general public. This helps bring international cinema to a city, whose existing film venues and festivals tend to exclude such films. Dollar Goal:  $5,000 Integrating History and Technology through training on 3D scanner and printer: Students interact with 3D scanned models in real time, deepening their [...]

Request for Proposals for Undergraduate Mayer Fellows, 2017-2018

Each academic year, DCII sponsors six undergraduate Mayer Undergraduate Research Fellows. These students have a double major or a major and minor(s), and at least one of these must be in Dedman College. With two faculty mentors, each Mayer Fellow conducts a research project that combines and integrates the perspectives of his/her major(s)/minor(s). Mayer Fellows have access to funds to use for research travel or for other expenses related to their research project. See website for details. Link for more information: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Programs/Mayer

Corporal punishment viewed as more acceptable and effective when referred to as spanking, study finds

Phys.org Originally Posted: January 4, 2016 Parents and nonparents alike feel better about corporal punishment when it's called 'spanking' rather than 'hitting' or 'beating,' according to a new study by researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Study participants judged identical acts of a child's misbehavior and the corporal punishment that followed it, but rated the discipline as better or worse simply depending on the verb used to describe it. Discipline acts referred to as spank and swat were ranked as more effective and acceptable than those referred to as slap, hit or beat. The findings of the study indicate that people buffer negative views of corporal punishment by calling it by a more culturally acceptable label, said psychologist Alan Brown, psychology professor at SMU and [...]

By | 2017-01-04T10:31:58+00:00 January 4th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Corporal punishment viewed as more acceptable and effective when referred to as spanking, study finds
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