Congratulations Dedman College Graduates!

SMU’s 102nd annual Commencement Weekend, May 19 and 20, 2017

 Baccalaureate Service :  8:00 p.m. Friday, May 19th Commencement: 9:00 a.m. Saturday, May 20th Watch Online @ smu.edu/live MORE INFO: http://www.smu.edu/EnrollmentServices/Registrar/AcademicCeremonies/MayCommencement  Message from the President and Provost On behalf of the Southern Methodist University community, we invite you to attend SMU's 102nd annual Commencement Weekend, May 19 and 20, 2017. The activities that make up Commencement Weekend showcase some of the University's best traditions and are designed to recognize the pride we all feel in our students' accomplishments. The Baccalaureate Service on Friday evening enables graduating seniors and their guests to worship together. Later, as these seniors march through the Rotunda of Dallas Hall for the tradition known as Rotunda Recessional, they mark the end of their undergraduate years and the beginning of their lifelong association [...]

SMU Dedman College alumnus Stephen Poulin ’12 starts apparel company to help veterans

The Beacon- Wicked Local  Originally Posted: April 26, 2017 With a logo that couples the East India Company symbol during the Revolutionary War with the Navy SEAL trident, Tea Party Rebels is more than a tribute to the patriotic, rebellious Boston colonists in 1773 and their defiant act against British-imposed taxation. The new business weaves the New England rebellious spirit into its clothing-- which benefits today’s patriots though various charity organizations. Spearheading it all is Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Class of 2008 graduate, Stephen Poulin, who has launched Tea Party Rebels LLC, his own apparel company created to benefit veterans, active servicemen and servicewomen and also first responders through a portion of the sales. Tea Party Rebels sells clothing that’s printed by a former Navy SEAL. Poulin, [...]

By | 2017-05-08T14:25:48+00:00 May 8th, 2017|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Psychology|Comments Off on SMU Dedman College alumnus Stephen Poulin ’12 starts apparel company to help veterans

Ernest Jouriles named SMU’s first G. Dale McKissick Endowed Professor of Psychology

SMU News Originally Posted: May 2, 2017 Ernest N. Jouriles, Dedman Family Distinguished Professor in SMU’s Department of Psychology and an internationally recognized expert in the psychology of family and relationship violence, has been named the University’s first G. Dale McKissick Endowed Professor of Psychology. He will begin his new duties on Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017. The professorship was made possible in 2014 through the estate of SMU alumnus McKissick, who graduated with a B.B.A. degree in 1950 and M.B.A. degree in 1954. Jouriles has several programs of research (in collaboration with SMU Professor of Psychology and Dedman College Senior Associate Dean for Research Renee McDonald). One program focuses on violence in adolescent romantic relationships and is dedicated to reaching a better understanding of risk factors for sexual and relationship violence among adolescents, [...]

By | 2017-05-03T11:09:17+00:00 May 3rd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Ernest Jouriles named SMU’s first G. Dale McKissick Endowed Professor of Psychology

Research on Exercise and Wellness Colloquium Series Features Psychology Assistant Professor, Dr. Austin Baldwin

Talk Abstract: Regular exercise affords many positive effects on health, longevity, and well-being. Despite its many benefits, the majority of adults in the United States do not engage in sufficient levels of regular exercise, and most people who initiate a routine of regular exercise fail to maintain it over time. One intriguing explanation for the widespread lack of regular exercise is that many people experience exercise to be affectively unpleasant, and as a result are less likely to engage in it regularly. In this talk, I will discuss findings across various studies we have conducted that focus on understanding the affective factors that are relevant to exercise and how they might be targeted for intervention. I will also discuss the implications of these findings for [...]

By | 2017-04-27T08:19:35+00:00 April 27th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Research on Exercise and Wellness Colloquium Series Features Psychology Assistant Professor, Dr. Austin Baldwin

LISTEN: Teens In Low-Income Families Get HPV Vaccine If Parents Persuade Themselves Of Benefits

KERA Originally Posted: April 11, 2017 Guilt, social pressure and even a doctor’s recommendation aren't enough to motivate low-income families to vaccinate their teenagers for Human Papillomavirus (HPV), according to research from Southern Methodist University. But a follow-up study from SMU finds that if parents persuade themselves of the benefits of the vaccinations, more teenagers in low-income families receive protection from the sexually transmitted, cancer-causing virus. LISTEN

By | 2017-04-13T07:56:01+00:00 April 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on LISTEN: Teens In Low-Income Families Get HPV Vaccine If Parents Persuade Themselves Of Benefits

New SMU study shows just how bad helicopter parenting can be on kids years later

Austin 360 Originally Posted: April 5, 2017 Researchers at Southern Methodist University studied college age kids who were either raised by helicopter parents — those that hover over everything their kids do — as well as parents who just didn’t encourage independence. Years later, all that helicoptering you’ve done could be affecting your college-age kids. What they found was surprising because it fell on gender lines. From the study press release: The researchers found that young women are negatively affected by helicopter parenting, while young men suffer when parents don’t encourage independence. “The sex difference was surprising,” said  family dynamics expert Chrystyna Kouros, an assistant professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and an author on the study.  “In Western culture in particular, boys [...]

By | 2017-04-10T08:45:26+00:00 April 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on New SMU study shows just how bad helicopter parenting can be on kids years later

Male and female college students react differently to misguided parenting according to a new study

SMU Research Originally Posted: April 4, 2017 Male and female college students react differently to misguided parenting, according to a new study that looked at the impact of helicopter parenting and fostering independence. Measuring both helicopter parenting as well as autonomy support — fostering independence — was important for the researchers to study, said family dynamics expert Chrystyna Kouros, an assistant professor of psychology at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and an author on the study. “Just because mom and dad aren’t helicopter parents, doesn’t necessarily mean they are supporting their young adult in making his or her own choices,” Kouros said. “The parent may be uninvolved, so we also wanted to know if parents are actually encouraging their student to be independent and make their [...]

By | 2017-04-04T08:33:50+00:00 April 4th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Male and female college students react differently to misguided parenting according to a new study

A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind

NPR Originally Posted: March 31, 2017 Take a deep breath in through your nose, and slowly let it out through your mouth. Do you feel calmer? Controlled breathing like this can combat anxiety, panic attacks and depression. It's one reason so many people experience tranquility after meditation or a pranayama yoga class. How exactly the brain associates slow breathing with calmness and quick breathing with nervousness, though, has been a mystery. Now, researchers say they've found the link, at least in mice. The key is a smattering of about 175 neurons in a part of the brain the researchers call the breathing pacemaker, which is a cluster of nearly 3,000 neurons that sit in the brainstem and control autonomic breathing. Through their research is in [...]

By | 2017-04-03T09:14:31+00:00 April 3rd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind
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