Semi Ojeleye Wins American Conference Player of the Year and Scholar-Athlete of the Year

SMU News Originally Posted: March 9, 2017 Psychology major and SMU forward Semi Ojeleye is this year’s breakout star on the men’s basketball team. The transfer from Duke leads the nationally ranked Mustangs in scoring, but his road to Dallas was not an easy one. Watch: Semi Shines at SMU

By | March 9th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Psychology, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Semi Ojeleye Wins American Conference Player of the Year and Scholar-Athlete of the Year

Self-persuasion iPad app spurs low-income parents to protect teens against cancer-causing hpv

Medical Xpress Originally Posted: March 7, 2017 As health officials struggle to boost the number of teens vaccinated against the deadly human papillomavirus, a new study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, found that self-persuasion works to bring parents on board. Currently public health efforts rely on educational messages and doctor recommendations to persuade parents to vaccinate their adolescents. Self-persuasion as a tool for HPV vaccinations has never been researched until now. The SMU study found that low-income parents will decide to have their teens vaccinated against the sexually transmitted cancer-causing virus if the parents persuade themselves of the protective benefits. The study's subjects—almost all moms—were taking their teens and pre-teens to a safety-net pediatric clinic for medical care. It's the first to look at changing [...]

By | March 8th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Self-persuasion iPad app spurs low-income parents to protect teens against cancer-causing hpv

#MustangsGiveBack is TODAY! Support Dedman College!

What will you support at SMU? Make a gift on March 7, 2017, and be a part of Mustangs Give Back, our annual one-day giving challenge. Here are some of the Dedman College projects on the #MustangsGiveBack list: Bring International Film Festival to Campus: SMU's spring international film festival brings the best of foreign cinema to campus. Films from the Arab world, Africa, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Spain, and many other countries and regions are screened at no cost to students or the general public. This helps bring international cinema to a city, whose existing film venues and festivals tend to exclude such films. Dollar Goal:  $5,000 Integrating History and Technology through training on 3D scanner and printer: Students interact with 3D scanned models in real time, deepening their [...]

Request for Proposals for Undergraduate Mayer Fellows, 2017-2018

Each academic year, DCII sponsors six undergraduate Mayer Undergraduate Research Fellows. These students have a double major or a major and minor(s), and at least one of these must be in Dedman College. With two faculty mentors, each Mayer Fellow conducts a research project that combines and integrates the perspectives of his/her major(s)/minor(s). Mayer Fellows have access to funds to use for research travel or for other expenses related to their research project. See website for details. Link for more information: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Programs/Mayer

Corporal punishment viewed as more acceptable and effective when referred to as spanking, study finds

Phys.org Originally Posted: January 4, 2016 Parents and nonparents alike feel better about corporal punishment when it's called 'spanking' rather than 'hitting' or 'beating,' according to a new study by researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Study participants judged identical acts of a child's misbehavior and the corporal punishment that followed it, but rated the discipline as better or worse simply depending on the verb used to describe it. Discipline acts referred to as spank and swat were ranked as more effective and acceptable than those referred to as slap, hit or beat. The findings of the study indicate that people buffer negative views of corporal punishment by calling it by a more culturally acceptable label, said psychologist Alan Brown, psychology professor at SMU and [...]

By | January 4th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Corporal punishment viewed as more acceptable and effective when referred to as spanking, study finds

George Holden, Psychology, Texas anti-paddling activists see little response to education secretary letter

Houston Press Originally Posted: December 13, 2016 It might be easy to imagine that the age of corporal punishment in Texas schools is, at last, at an end. Representative Alma Allen (D-Harris) and Representative Eddie Lucio III (D-Cameron) have both introduced bills this session to ban corporal punishment. Last month, Secretary of Education John B. King sent a letter to officials urging the 19 states that still allow paddling in schools to end it, while more than 80 advocacy groups – including organizations representing women, people of color and disabled people – penned an open letter recommending the same. But advocates for the end of corporal punishment say that while these letters were exciting, they have yet to lead to actual progress in Texas, where nearly [...]

By | December 21st, 2016|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on George Holden, Psychology, Texas anti-paddling activists see little response to education secretary letter

Need a last minute gift? How about a book?

SMU News Originally Posted: Complete your holiday gift list with books published in 2016 by the SMU community, including faculty, staff, alumni, libraries and museum. Need to satisfy a history buff? This list has it covered in genres from art to science to the Southwest. Find selections for readers of poetry, personal and spiritual enrichment, young adult fiction and celebrity memoir. There’s a southern-themed cookbook for foodies, a literary Shakespearean riff in the form of a card game, and an arty crime caper filled with mystery and intrigue to the end. This collection has something for all reading preferences, from light to serious. Some selections are available at the SMU bookstore, but all are available via online booksellers unless otherwise noted. Authors are listed alphabetically. [...]

Determined to live a life of significance

SMU News Originally Posted: December 13, 2016 After surviving two childhood liver transplants, followed by years of related medical complications, SMU senior Libby Arterburn is determined to live a life of significance. She will graduate from SMU Dec. 17 with degrees in health and society, psychology and a minor in biology, which she intends to apply toward a medical career. Arterburn was diagnosed at age six weeks with antitrypsin deficiency disorder, a rare genetic condition in which the body does not make enough of a protein that protects the liver and lungs from damage. By the time she was four, she required a life-saving liver transplant. Complications led to a second transplant two days later. Since then, Arterburn has endured regular liver biopsies, multiple hospitalizations [...]

By | December 16th, 2016|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Psychology|Comments Off on Determined to live a life of significance
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