Get to Know U.S. Amateur Champ Bryson DeChambeau: He Majors in Physics at SMU and Applies His Studies to his Golf Game

Golf.com

Originally Posted: August 24, 2015

4 things you need to know about Bryson DeChambeau

Bryson DeChambeau won the U.S. Amateur in stunning fashion. Here are four things you should know about the talented youngster.

OLYMPIA FIELDS, IL - AUGUST 23: Bryson DeChambeau hits out of the sand trap on the seventh hole during the final match of the U.S. Amateur Championship at Olympia Fields Country Club August 23, 2015 in Olympia Fields, Illinois. (Photo by Jeff Haynes/Getty Images)
OLYMPIA FIELDS, IL – AUGUST 23: Bryson DeChambeau hits out of the sand trap on the seventh hole during the final match of the U.S. Amateur Championship at Olympia Fields Country Club August 23, 2015 in Olympia Fields, Illinois. (Photo by Jeff Haynes/Getty Images)

 

1. Bryson DeChambeau is just the fifth player to win both the U.S. Amateur and the NCAA individual title in the same year.

Jack Nicklaus (’61), Phil Mickelson (’90), Tiger Woods (’96) and Ryan Moore (’04) are the only other players to grab both titles in the same season. The 21-year-old will also make an appearance for Team USA at September’s 2015 Walker Cup at Royal Lytham & St. Annes.

2. He majors in physics at SMU and applies his studies to his golf game.

According to Golf Channel, DeChambeau gives new meaning to the term student-athlete. He uses a green-reading system called Vector Putting that factors in a variety of stats, like green speed, green slope and the length of the putt; he cuts all of his irons to the same length (a 6-iron) to create a single-plane swing; and he uses a putter with torque balance to keep his stroke square. READ MORE

Dedman College undergraduate student and champion golfer Bryson DeChambeau feels no pressure to turn pro, wants to complete Physics degree

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: August 26, 2015

UNIVERSITY PARK — Education has been crucial in getting SMU golfer Bryson DeChambeau to where he is today, so he was adamant Wednesday that he will eventually get his degree.

When that might happen, however, is a bit of a question after the 21-year-old senior became only the fifth man in history to win the NCAA tournament and the U.S. Amateur in the same year.

“I plan to stay in college and complete my degree,” DeChambeau said. “Whether I get it done this year, I’m not 100 percent sure.”

DeChambeau said he could finish up his major in the first semester and then fill in with online courses, but he said he will think long and hard before he eventually commits to turning pro. Next up is the Walker Cup, Sept. 12-13 in England. If he doesn’t turn pro, he will receive invitations to next year’s Masters, U.S. Open, British Open and U.S. Amateur. READ MORE

Congrats to senior Bryson DeChambeau as he advanced to the U.S. Amateur final

New York Times

Originally Posted: August 22, 2015

OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. — SMU senior Bryson DeChambeau advanced to the U.S. Amateur final, putting him a victory away from becoming the fifth player to win the tournament and NCAA individual title in the same year.

DeChambeau, from Clovis, California, beat Southern California sophomore Sean Crocker 4 and 3 in the semifinals Saturday at Olympia Fields. He will face Virginia junior Derek Bard of New Hartford, New York, in the 36-hole final Sunday. Bard topped Japan’s Kenta Konishi 3 and 2.

“It’ll be a fun battle,” DeChambeau said. “If I can stay in the moment, I’ll be all right.”

Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996) and Ryan Moore (2004) are the only players to sweep the NCAA and Amateur titles in a season. READ MORE

Physicist Tom Coan is a principal with an international team unraveling the secrets of neutrinos.

SMU

Originally Posted: August 7, 2015

Fermilab experiment observes change in neutrinos from one type to another over 500 miles

Scientists have sorted through millions of cosmic ray strikes and zeroed in on neutrino interactions in their quest to learn more about the abundant yet mysterious particles that flit through ordinary matter as though it isn’t there.

Initial data from a new U.S.–based physics experiment indicates scientists are a step closer to understanding neutrinos, the second most abundant particle in the universe. READ MORE

Cas Milner, Physics, subatomic particles could help detect damaged pipes

Inside Science

Originally posted: June 30, 2015

The subatomic muon could reveal potentially disastrous pipe corrosion.

By: Charles Q. Choi, Contributor
(Inside Science) — Of all the parts of the nation’s infrastructure that one might want least to fail, nuclear power plants might rank the highest. U.S. nuclear power plants are on average more than 30 years old now, and pipes within them can corrode over time with potentially lethal results. Now researchers suggest they could noninvasively scan infrastructure for weak points with the aid of subatomic particles streaking down from the sky.

Water and steam pumped through a pipe in a power plant or industrial refinery can eat away one side of the pipe. In 2004, such corrosion led a pipe to break at Mihama Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, killing five people and injuring six others with super-hot high-pressure steam in Japan’s worst nuclear power accident until Fukushima.

Analyzing the structural integrity of pipes typically involves ultrasound and X-ray scans. READ MORE

Dedman College students receive prestigious national fellowships and awards

Congratulations to the Dedman College students awarded prestigious national fellowships and awards during the 2014-15 academic year, including Fulbright Grants and a fellowship to the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress. These students include:

Fulbright Scholar:

Whitney Goodwin
Michaela Wallerstedt
Kandi Doming

Institute for Responsible Citizenship Scholar:

Garrett Fisher

Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress Presidential Fellow:

Tracy Nelson

National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates

Nicole Hartman

READ MORE