SMU students in Paris report they are safe; SMU monitoring situation

SMU News

Originally Posted: November 14, 2015

SMU has heard from all 11 of its students studying in Paris that they are safe. The SMU Travel Oversight Committee is closely monitoring the situation and is receiving updates from the U.S. State Department and International SOS.

SMU community members abroad are asked to be aware that France has declared a national state of emergency and has tightened its borders. On Saturday, November 14, the U.S. Embassy in France issued a security message regarding the terrorist attacks: “Further incidents are possible. We strongly urge U.S. citizens to maintain a high level of vigilance, be aware of local events, and take the appropriate steps to bolster their personal security, including limiting their movements to essential activity. U.S. citizens are encouraged to monitor media and local information sources and factor updated information into personal travel plans and activities.” While airports and train stations remain open, travelers may expect delays due to heightened security measures.
All SMU Abroad students are covered by emergency travel assistance through I-SOS and may use the services of I-SOS worldwide during their term of study abroad. During SMU Abroad orientation, students received laminated cards with emergency phone numbers for I-SOS. I-SOS contact information also is available online at In addition, every SMU-approved study abroad program has its own emergency preparedness plan and protocols.

Students with concerns or questions are asked to contact the SMU Abroad Director, Dr. Cathy Winnie, at (214-768-4904) or SMU Assistant Chief of Police Jim Walters at (214-768-1586). Student safety is the highest priority of SMU and our partner study abroad programs. READ MORE

Meet Dedman College Faculty during Family Weekend

2:00PM 3:00PM

Dedman College, the heart of SMU houses the vital disciplines the underlie great accomplishment. Denman College offers 85 exciting majors and minors in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Their award winning faculty will be available to discuss their teaching and research interests. READ MORE

Event: Scientific Research and Public Responses: A Faculty Panel Discussion

Date: November 5th

Time: 5:00 p.m. Reception, 5:30 p.m. Panel

Location: McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall

science 3Why have we moved from, “I don’t fully understand the science, but I trust the scientists.” to, “I don’t fully understand the science and I don’t trust the scientists to be honest about it.”? Join us for a panel discussion with Louis Jacobs, David Meltzer, Randall Scalise, and John Wise, moderated by Lee Cullum of KERA News. Contact for more information

Robert Kehoe, Physics, New precise particle measurement improves subatomic tool for probing mysteries of universe

Originally Posted: September 29, 2015

Physicists at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, have achieved a new precise measurement of a key subatomic particle, opening the door to better understanding some of the deepest mysteries of our universe.

The researchers calculated the new measurement for a critical characteristic—mass—of the top quark.
Quarks make up the protons and neutrons that comprise almost all visible matter. Physicists have known the top quark’s mass was large, but encountered great difficulty trying to clearly determine it.
The newly calculated measurement of the top quark will help guide physicists in formulating new theories, said Robert Kehoe, a professor in SMU’s Department of Physics. Kehoe leads the SMU group that performed the measurement.
Top quark’s mass matters ultimately because the particle is a highly sensitive probe and key tool to evaluate competing theories about the nature of matter and the fate of the universe. READ MORE
Read more at:

DeChambeau Uses Physics and Irons for Rare Dual Titles

New York Times (AP)

Posted: September 10, 2015

Bryson DeChambeau is a physics major with a unique approach to golf, and a set of irons all cut to the same length.

There is also the Ben Hogan-style cap the SMU senior wears when he plays, and the rare distinction that added him to a group of elite golfers: Jack Nicklaus, Phil Mickelson, Tiger Woods and Ryan Moore. READ MORE

Get to Know U.S. Amateur Champ Bryson DeChambeau: He Majors in Physics at SMU and Applies His Studies to his Golf Game

Originally Posted: August 24, 2015

4 things you need to know about Bryson DeChambeau

Bryson DeChambeau won the U.S. Amateur in stunning fashion. Here are four things you should know about the talented youngster.

OLYMPIA FIELDS, IL - AUGUST 23: Bryson DeChambeau hits out of the sand trap on the seventh hole during the final match of the U.S. Amateur Championship at Olympia Fields Country Club August 23, 2015 in Olympia Fields, Illinois. (Photo by Jeff Haynes/Getty Images)
OLYMPIA FIELDS, IL – AUGUST 23: Bryson DeChambeau hits out of the sand trap on the seventh hole during the final match of the U.S. Amateur Championship at Olympia Fields Country Club August 23, 2015 in Olympia Fields, Illinois. (Photo by Jeff Haynes/Getty Images)


1. Bryson DeChambeau is just the fifth player to win both the U.S. Amateur and the NCAA individual title in the same year.

Jack Nicklaus (’61), Phil Mickelson (’90), Tiger Woods (’96) and Ryan Moore (’04) are the only other players to grab both titles in the same season. The 21-year-old will also make an appearance for Team USA at September’s 2015 Walker Cup at Royal Lytham & St. Annes.

2. He majors in physics at SMU and applies his studies to his golf game.

According to Golf Channel, DeChambeau gives new meaning to the term student-athlete. He uses a green-reading system called Vector Putting that factors in a variety of stats, like green speed, green slope and the length of the putt; he cuts all of his irons to the same length (a 6-iron) to create a single-plane swing; and he uses a putter with torque balance to keep his stroke square. READ MORE

Dedman College undergraduate student and champion golfer Bryson DeChambeau feels no pressure to turn pro, wants to complete Physics degree

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: August 26, 2015

UNIVERSITY PARK — Education has been crucial in getting SMU golfer Bryson DeChambeau to where he is today, so he was adamant Wednesday that he will eventually get his degree.

When that might happen, however, is a bit of a question after the 21-year-old senior became only the fifth man in history to win the NCAA tournament and the U.S. Amateur in the same year.

“I plan to stay in college and complete my degree,” DeChambeau said. “Whether I get it done this year, I’m not 100 percent sure.”

DeChambeau said he could finish up his major in the first semester and then fill in with online courses, but he said he will think long and hard before he eventually commits to turning pro. Next up is the Walker Cup, Sept. 12-13 in England. If he doesn’t turn pro, he will receive invitations to next year’s Masters, U.S. Open, British Open and U.S. Amateur. READ MORE

Congrats to senior Bryson DeChambeau as he advanced to the U.S. Amateur final

New York Times

Originally Posted: August 22, 2015

OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. — SMU senior Bryson DeChambeau advanced to the U.S. Amateur final, putting him a victory away from becoming the fifth player to win the tournament and NCAA individual title in the same year.

DeChambeau, from Clovis, California, beat Southern California sophomore Sean Crocker 4 and 3 in the semifinals Saturday at Olympia Fields. He will face Virginia junior Derek Bard of New Hartford, New York, in the 36-hole final Sunday. Bard topped Japan’s Kenta Konishi 3 and 2.

“It’ll be a fun battle,” DeChambeau said. “If I can stay in the moment, I’ll be all right.”

Jack Nicklaus (1961), Phil Mickelson (1990), Tiger Woods (1996) and Ryan Moore (2004) are the only players to sweep the NCAA and Amateur titles in a season. READ MORE

Physicist Tom Coan is a principal with an international team unraveling the secrets of neutrinos.


Originally Posted: August 7, 2015

Fermilab experiment observes change in neutrinos from one type to another over 500 miles

Scientists have sorted through millions of cosmic ray strikes and zeroed in on neutrino interactions in their quest to learn more about the abundant yet mysterious particles that flit through ordinary matter as though it isn’t there.

Initial data from a new U.S.–based physics experiment indicates scientists are a step closer to understanding neutrinos, the second most abundant particle in the universe. READ MORE