SMU to host early voting Oct. 31, Nov. 1

SMU News

Originally Posted: October 26, 2016

DALLAS (SMU) – Early voting for Dallas County residents will be available on the SMU campus Oct. 31 and Nov. 1.  The polling place at the Hughes-Trigg Student Center, 3140 Dyer St., will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. both days, and free parking will be available in the Binkley and Moody parking garages to accommodate early voters.

“It can be hard for students living on campus to find the time and transportation to get to off-campus polling places on election day, so we’re very pleased the Dallas County Commissioners chose to locate an early-voting site at SMU,” said Brad Cheves, SMU vice president for development and external affairs.  “This encourages our students to participate in our democracy, and it’s exciting that many of them will be voting here for the first time. We also welcome our faculty and staff and other Dallas County voters to vote on campus.”

Participants in early voting must be registered in Dallas County and present one of the following forms of identification. Expired versions are acceptable, so long as they’ve expired within the past four years:

  • Texas driver’s license issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
  • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
  • Texas personal identification card issued by DPS
  • Texas license to carry a handgun issued by DPS
  • United States military identification card containing the person’s photograph
  • United States citizenship certificate containing the person’s photograph
  • United States passport

If the voter does not possess one of the forms of identification listed above, he or she can present one of the supporting forms of ID listed below and sign at the polling place a Reasonable Impediment Declaration, which note’s the voter’s reasonable impediment to obtaining an acceptable form of photo identification:

  • Valid voter registration certificate
  • Certified birth certificate (must be an original)
  • Current utility bill, copy or original
  • Current bank statement, copy or original
  • Government check, copy or original
  • Paycheck, copy or original
  • Government document with your name and an address (original required if it contains a photograph) READ MORE


Numerical analysis of the Galerkin and weak Galerkin method for the Helmholtz equation with high wave number

Event date: Wednesday, November 2, 2016
Location: Clements Hall 126
Time: 3:30–4:30pm

Featured Speaker: Dr. Zhimin ZhangDepartment of Mathematics, Wayne State University and the Beijing Center for Computational Science

Abstract: We study convergence property of the weak Galerkin method of fixed degree p and supercovergence property of the linear finite element method for the Helmholtz problem with large wave number.

  1. Using a modified duality argument, we improve the existing error estimates of the WG method, in particular, the error estimates with explicit dependence on the wave number k are derived, it is shown that if k(kh)p+1 is sufficiently small, then the pollution error in the energy norm is bounded by O(k(kh)2p), which coincides with the phase error of the finite element method obtained by existent dispersion analyses.
  2. For linear finite element method under certain mesh condition, we obtain the H1-error estimate with explicit dependence on the wave number k and show that the error between the finite element solution and the linear interpolation of the exact solution is superconvergent in the H1-seminorm, although the pollution error still exists. We proved a similar result for the recovered gradient by polynomial preserving recovery (PPR) and found that the PPR can only improve the interpolation error and has no effect on the pollution error. Furthermore, we estimated the error between the finite element gradient and recovered gradient and discovered that the pollution error is canceled between these two quantities. Finally, we apply the Richardson extrapolation to the recovered gradient and demonstrate numerically that PPR combined with the Richardson extrapolation can reduce the interpolation and pollution errors simultaneously, and therefore, leads to an asymptotically exact a posteriori error estimator.

All theoretical findings are verified by numerical tests. READ MORE

Department of Mathematics Research Colloquium: Efficient time-domain DG methods for wave propagation

Event Date: October 26, 2016
Location: Clements Hall 126
Time: 3:30–4:30 (Refreshments are served 15 minutes before the talk)

Mathematics Colloquium Talk by Jesse Chan (Rice University)

Link for more information:

Contact: A. J. Meir

Event: Dynamics of Clean Foams, October 19

Event Date: October 19, 2016
Location: Clements Hall 126
Time: 3:30–4:30 (Refreshments are served 15 minutes before the talk)

Dynamics of Clean Foams. A Mathematics Colloquium Talk by Stephen Davis (Northwestern University.) For more information:

Or contact: A. J. Meir

Fondren library closed Saturday, September 17th

Fondren Library will be closed this Saturday, September 17th for Game Day. Regular hours will resume Sunday September 18th at Noon. READ MORE 

SMU climbs to 56 in U.S. News & World Report rankings

SMU News

Originally Posted: September 13, 2016

DALLAS (SMU) – SMU rose to its highest ranking among the nation’s universities in the 2017 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges, released online today.

Among 220 institutions classified as national universities, SMU ranks 56, up from 61 a year ago.

The new ranking again places SMU in the first tier of institutions in the guide’s “best national universities” category. In Texas, only Rice University ranks higher. SMU and the University of Texas-Austin were tied.  Among private national universities, SMU ranks 39.

SMU’s increase was one of the five largest among the top 100 universities. Since 2008, SMU’s 11-point increase is one of the four largest among schools in the top 60.

For the rankings, U.S. News considers measures of academic quality, such as peer assessment scores and ratings by high school counselors, faculty resources, student selectivity, graduation rate performance, financial resources and alumni giving. SMU ranks 24 among all national universities in alumni giving at 25 percent.

In other ranking categories, SMU ranks 32 as one of the best national universities for veterans.

“It is gratifying for SMU to be recognized for its positive movement among the best national universities,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “The ranking is an example of the momentum of the Second Century Campaign and the University’s Centennial Celebration.

“We appreciate external recognition of our progress and believe it’s valid, but we also know that rankings do not portray the whole picture of an institution and its strengths. We encourage parents and students to visit the institutions they are considering for a firsthand look at the academic offerings, the campus environment and the surrounding community to best gauge a university.”

The rankings of 1,374 institutions, including national universities, liberal arts colleges, regional colleges and regional universities, are available now online and on newsstands Sept. 23. Find the “Best Colleges 2017” guidebook in stores Oct. 4. READ MORE


SMU-trained physicist who bolstered Big Bang theory dies at 84

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: August 31, 2016

James Cronin, a Southern Methodist University graduate who shared a Nobel Prize for explaining why the universe survived the Big Bang, died last Thursday in St. Paul, Minn. He was 84.

His death was confirmed by the University of Chicago, where he was a professor emeritus. No cause was given.

In 1964, Cronin and Val Fitch of Princeton University were conducting experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island involving matter and antimatter: particles that have the same mass but hold opposite (though equal) charges, either positive or negative, compelling them to destroy each other on contact.

The researchers found that for all their similarities, the particles obeyed slightly different laws of physics: that there was, as Cronin put it, “a fundamental asymmetry between matter and antimatter.”

This contradicted a bedrock scientific principle known as charge-parity invariance, which had assumed that the same laws of physics would apply if the charges of particles were reversed from positive to negative or vice versa.

The finding, known as the Fitch-Cronin effect, bolstered the Big Bang theory, mainly by explaining why the matter and antimatter produced by the explosion did not annihilate each other, leaving nothing but light instead of a residue that evolved into stars, planets and people.

“We now believe this tiny difference led to us,” Michael S. Turner, an astrophysicist at the University of Chicago, said last year after Fitch died at 91.

James Watson Cronin was born in Chicago on Sept. 29, 1931. His father, also named James, met Cronin’s mother, the former Dorothy Watson, in a Greek class at Northwestern University. The elder James Cronin became a professor of Latin and Greek at SMU.

Cronin’s infatuation with physics began in high school. He graduated in 1951 from SMU, where he majored in physics and mathematics. He received a doctoral degree from the University of Chicago, where he studied under Enrico Fermi, Edward Teller and Murray Gell-Mann. His thesis was on experimental nuclear physics.

Cronin’s first wife, the former Annette Martin, died in 2005. He is survived by their children, Emily Grothe and Daniel Cronin; his second wife, the former Carol Champlin McDonald; and six grandchildren.

After collaborating with Cronin at Brookhaven, Fitch, the son of a Nebraska rancher, recruited him to Princeton. Cronin was lured back to the University of Chicago in 1971, attracted in part by one of the world’s most powerful particle accelerators, which was being built at what is now known as the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, operated by the university in partnership with a consortium of other educational institutions. He was offered a post teaching physics, astronomy and astrophysics.

Cronin and Fitch were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1980. But Cronin acknowledged that they had not completely solved a riddle of the universe.

“We know that improvements in detector technology and quality of accelerators will permit even more sensitive experiments in the coming decades,” he said at the time. “We are hopeful, then, that at some epoch, perhaps distant, this cryptic message from nature will be deciphered.”

Working with Fitch and using instruments they had devised, Cronin conducted his groundbreaking experiments when he was in his early 30s, less than a decade after he had received his doctorate. Why did it take the Nobel Committee 16 years to recognize their achievement?

“I don’t think that people recognized that this had something to do with one of the most fundamental aspects of nature, with the origin of the universe,” Cronin said in the 2006 book Candid Science VI: More Conversations With Famous Scientists, by Istvan Hargittai and Magdolna Hargittai. “I think that it took a while to realize this.”

He added: “For me, this was actually a good thing. I was much too young at that time to deal with such a thing as the Nobel Prize.” READ MORE

Oh, the places Dedman College students will go… (after graduation)!

Dedman College graduate employer list

Welcome to the Class of 2020

SMU News

Originally Posted: August 22, 2016

Following you will find Class of 2020 PhotoMaking the Class of 2020 PhotoOpening Convocation scenesOpening Convocation speechCamp Corral scenes“Discover Dallas” scenes“Discover Dallas” StorifyCorral Kick-OffMove-In video and scenes, and AARO.

SMU Class of 2020 Photo

SMU Class of 2020