Author Archives: Meghan Ryan

About Meghan Ryan

AA-Law(Faculty)

Finding Ways for Students to Discover Their Passion

In a poor part of Matamoros, Mexico, one elementary school teacher—Sergio Juarez Correa—is changing the way he approaches teaching. He is convinced that by allowing his students to direct their own education, he can in some sense level the playing … Continue reading

Posted in Active Learning, Course Design, Inspiration, Pedagogical Theory, Teaching Methods | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Teaching and Tenure

As the high cost of university education has come under scrutiny in our fragile economic climate, significant attention has been devoted to the value of tenure. In my small corner of academia, the American Bar Association—the accrediting body for law … Continue reading

Posted in Course Design, Pedagogical Theory, Teaching Evaluations, Teaching Methods | 1 Comment

Is the Tide Turning on MOOCs (and Other Online Courses)?

Is the tide turning on MOOCs (massive open online courses)? An April 29th Chronicle of Higher Education article explains how, earlier this month, Amherst College turned down an ordinarily coveted invitation to join edX: Amherst’s rejection of edX, decided by … Continue reading

Posted in Course Design, Large Classes, Technology | Leave a comment

Higher Ed Faculty: Teachers, Mentors, Advisors, Parents, or Friends?

A recent inquiry by one of my colleagues regarding faculty members’ student attendance policies in class has prompted me to revisit a handful of related questions that I am often asking myself and others: What is the scope of my … Continue reading

Posted in Students, Technology, Writing | Leave a comment

Reflections of a First-Time Classroom Blogger

This semester, for the first time, I experimented with blogging in one of my seminar courses. I asked the students to post at least one blog entry every other week and to feel free to post additional entries and/or comment … Continue reading

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Training Independent, and Diverse, Thinkers

Last month, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin—the big affirmative action case. The Supreme Court last tackled the issue nine years ago. Basically, the plaintiff in Fisher is arguing that UT should … Continue reading

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