Monthly Archives: November 2013

Robots in My Classroom

Two to three times a week, talking robots, cartoon animals, and humorous drawings of celebrity figures make appearances in my Problems in the Philosophy of Religion classroom. In full color, but with oddly stilted voices, they discuss evil, Anselm’s proof … Continue reading

Posted in Active Learning, Critical Thinking, Students, Technology | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Craigslist learning

This week I have some curmudgeonly (that is actually a word that my spell checker ok’d) thoughts to share. My faculty colleague found this CragislistAd [BT update: I’ve posted this link to the ad text, because the original has been … Continue reading

Posted in Students | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Twitter for Academics

Let’s face it:  among many academics, Twitter has a bad rap.  Maybe it’s because we first became aware of it through celebrity overexposure (Lady Gaga has over 40 million followers) or the trivial oversharing of its contributors (“eggs over easy … Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Technology | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Finding Ways for Students to Discover Their Passion

In a poor part of Matamoros, Mexico, one elementary school teacher—Sergio Juarez Correa—is changing the way he approaches teaching. He is convinced that by allowing his students to direct their own education, he can in some sense level the playing … Continue reading

Posted in Active Learning, Course Design, Inspiration, Pedagogical Theory, Teaching Methods | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Why don’t students ask for help? What can you do?

It is that time in the semester when grades become more real and students can see the end of the semester and finals approaching. Around this time, I have several students who are proactive and seek out appointments with me … Continue reading

Posted in Students, Teaching Methods | Tagged | 3 Comments