The generous gifts of alumni, family and friends have established dozens of endowed faculty positions at SMU, enabling the University to attract leading scholars with significant research funds and competitive salaries. Through The Second Century Campaign, SMU aims to increase to 100 the number of endowed academic positions.

Following are two examples of professors whose work is supported by endowments.

David J. Chard 
Leon Simmons Endowed Dean of Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

As dean of Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, David J. Chard is committed to helping build a solid foundation for the new school and ensuring that students receive the necessary to be effective teachers, counselors and experts in other aspects of human development. Chard is a scholar on reading and learning disabilities whose publications include more than 30 research articles, 12 books and 18 technical reports, monographs and training guides. He was drawn to the field of special education while teaching mathematics and chemistry for nearly 10 years in high school classrooms. There he frequently encountered students who struggled with math and science concepts because of difficulties with reading, language and vocabulary development. Chard focused his subsequent scholarship and research on the role of instruction in the development of basic literacy and numbers skills for students with learning disabilities or those at risk for school failure.

As dean of Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, David J. Chard is committed to helping build a solid foundation for the new school and ensuring that students receive the training necessary to be effective teachers, counselors and experts in other aspects of human development. Chard is a scholar on reading and learning disabilities whose publications include more than 30 research articles, 12 books and 18 technical reports, monographs and training guides. He was drawn to the field of special education while teaching mathematics and chemistry for nearly 10 years in high school classrooms. There he frequently encountered students who struggled with math and science concepts because of difficulties with reading, language and vocabulary development. Chard focused his subsequent scholarship and research on the role of instruction in the development of basic literacy and numbers skills for students with learning disabilities or those at risk for school failure.

Chard came to SMU in 2007 from the University of Oregon, where he was associate dean for curriculum and academic programs in the College of Education. He holds a Ph.D. in special education from Oregon and has taught at Boston University, the University of Texas at Austin and in California public schools. He also has served as a Peace Corps educator in Africa.

Brian W. Stump 
Claude C. Albritton, Jr. Chair in the Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in Dedman College

When a series of small earthquakes shook North Texas in recent months, Brian W. Stump, professor of earth sciences in Dedman College, led the SMU team that investigated. The SMU experts set up 10 high-tech seismic instrument stations, loaned by the National Science Foundation, in parts of Tarrant and Johnson counties to get a better reading on the phenomena. While the results are still pending, the research has attracted national media coverage and widespread interest. Although these earthquakes were close to home, seismic disruptions have spurred Stump to travel around the world to understand better the earth’s crust and mantle.

Since 2002 he has taken part in a joint U.S.-China research project north of Beijing sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory. Scientists there deployed a network of seismic stations to record broadband waves from earthquakes and such man-induced events as mining explosions. And for more than a decade, Stump and fellow SMU scientists have been involved with a research project in South Korea sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense that also followed sound waves from explosions and earthquakes through the atmosphere.

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